Miami Beach

Emily Michot emichot@miamiherald.com

Miami Beach won't be elevating new roads anytime soon, after fierce opposition from residents who alternatively insisted their neighborhood didn't flood and therefore didn't need higher streets, or who worried higher streets would send floodwater into their homes.

Neighbors in the city's latest stop on its internationally lauded $500 million plan to pump, pipe and elevate itself away from rising seas fought back from what they say is an unnecessary project — one they say will ruin their property values.

J. Wakefield Brewing

The City of Miami Beach has proven vulnerable to sea level rise and increasingly powerful hurricanes. The roads are equally burdened with taking on millions of tourists each year. The City's new Director of Public Works, Roy Coley, is tasked with overseeing these challenges. He joined the program to speak on the measures the City is taking to improve its infrastructure and resiliency.

Danny Hwang / WLRN News

Miami Beach celebrated pride in its 10th annual Gay Pride Festival this past week. Events began last Monday with a rainbow flag-raising ceremony at City Hall.

On Sunday, the event culminated with a parade. Ocean Drive was shut down for the duration of the main parade, which ran from Fifth to 15th streets.

Paul Thomas is on the board of Miami Beach Gay Pride. He said 83 groups would draw a crowd of more than 135,000 people.

“Lots of creativity, lots of fun as everybody marches down Ocean Drive celebrating who they are,” he said.

Miami Herald file

Guests for Sundial on Wednesday, March 28, 2018:

The city of Miami Beach has been accommodating mass amounts of people for decades. However, this year's St. Patrick's Day celebrations coupled with hordes of spring breakers who saturated the streets to the point that eastbound traffic on the MacArthur Causeway was shut down to prevent people from entering the city. 

Leslie Ovalle / WLRN

The first of more than 800 March For Our Lives events in Washington, D.C., the U.S. and around the world took place early on Saturday on the island of Pohnpei in the Pacific nation of Micronesia.

Here in South Florida, things kicked off, fittingly, in Parkland - which was the site of the February 14 mass shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School that killed 17 people and ignited the student-led #NeverAgain movement for stricter gun control and school safety. Marches were also held in Miami Beach, Boca Raton and Key West.

How Spring Break Crowds Closed Causeway To South Beach

Mar 20, 2018
Discoizzy / Wikimedia Commons

Despite the perfect weather last weekend, another kind of perfect storm landed on South Beach.

Hector Gabino / El Nuevo Herald

Guests on Sundial for Tuesday, March 6:

Gubernatorial candidates from across the state are preparing for the primary elections that are taking place in August. Miami Beach's former mayor, Philip Levine, has tossed his hat in the ring to run to be Florida's next governor.  He spoke about his plans leading up to the primary elections and what he hopes to accomplish should he become Florida's next governor.

Hip-hop has had a steady presence in mainstream media. Successful Hip-Hop movies like "Boyz In The Hood" and more recently "Straight Outta Compton" validate the appeal the genre has on different audiences. Lately, Hip-Hop has gravitated to the playhouse. The meteoric success of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s "Hamilton" is a testament that Hip-Hop may have a place in the theater.

Say it ain’t so.

Miami Herald File

For two years, the rabbinic search committee at Temple Beth Sholom in Miami Beach looked nationally to find the right person to be the new senior rabbi at the 75-year-old synagogue. To no one’s surprise, the new senior rabbi is actually a rabbi who has served Temple Beth Sholom since 1994 — Rabbi Gayle Pomerantz. Her new duties will begin on June 1.

Pomerantz will be the first female rabbi in the history of the synagogue. She succeeds Rabbi Gary Glickstein, who has served as senior rabbi since 1985.

Today on Sundial: Miami Beach’s new mayor, Dan Gelber, joins us in the studio to talk about the future challenges the city faces.

Miami Beach residents can expect a low-key  style from Gelber, who understands the intricacies of policymaking and knows the influence the mayor can have in the city. Gelber has a very different style than his predecessor, Phillip Levine, who has officially launched his run for governor.

AP

Deerfield Beach is following Miami Beach's lead in prohibiting plastic foam containers, like Styrofoam, on the sand.

Deerfield Beach officials banned polystyrene containers, like coffee cups and coolers, from all city events starting October 1. Even vendors can’t use the material, which isn’t biodegradable and often ends up in the ocean.

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

Seymour Gelber stood in front of a packed chamber at Miami Beach City Hall where he once presided as mayor. Now 98, with a dose of pride and humor, he swore his son Dan into the office he once held, commending him for his record of public service.

Seymour Gelber pointed out that even though Dan Gelber, 56, has held weighty positions in public life — federal prosecutor and a top lawmaker in Tallahassee — he’s never taken himself too seriously.

The Holocaust Museum Miami Beach held a special event in remembrance of Kristallnacht, also known as the Night of Broken Glass, on Nov. 9, the anniversary of the event.

Herbert Karliner, Miami-Beach resident and Holocaust survivor, was 13 when his family’s grocery store was destroyed during Kristallnacht. He was set to speak at the event, joined by Yad Vashem scholar Sheryl Ochayon.

Mr. Karliner and Ms. Ochayon joined us on Wednesday’s edition of Sundial.

Wilson Sayre

The effort to put emergency money for food into the pockets and bank accounts of South Florida meant waiting in  lines and in court this week.

D-SNAP is the government program for disaster food assistance. The federal government program returned to the region for three days this week after overwhelming demand last month led to long lines and police shutting down some distribution sites over public safety concerns. 

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