Mexico

Felipe Dana / AP via Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

When the Bahamas issued a travel advisory last weekend about visiting the U.S. – citing police brutality against black people – my first reaction was:

The Bahamas is warning Bahamians about cop cruelty against blacks in America? How about warning Bahamians about cop cruelty against blacks in the Bahamas?

Donald Trump Faces The Mexican F-Bomb. As In, Fox.

Jun 7, 2016
Eduardo Verdugo / AP via Miami Herald

The bad blood between Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump and Mexico continues – and lately it has involved Miami.

Last week Trump took offense when the PGA moved a major pro golf tournament from his Trump National Doral Miami resort to Mexico City.

“You vote for Donald Trump as President,” he told supporters, “this stuff is all gonna stop.”

And even before the PGA announcement, Trump made yet another disparaging remark about Mexicans – calling out the Mexican ancestry of Gonzalo Curiel, a U.S. federal judge he’s feuding with.

Fox Vs. Trump: Former Mexican President On The Donald's Doral Golf Grief

Jun 1, 2016
Spencer Parts / WLRN.org

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump got bad news today: The PGA announced it’s moving a major pro golf tournament from the Trump National resort here in Doral to Mexico.

That country's been the target of some of Trump's  harshest campaign rhetoric – he's called Mexican immigrants "drug traffickers" and "rapists" and has pledged to make Mexico pay for a border wall – and the PGA tournament is relocating to Mexico City in large part because it got a better deal to move south of the border to the Chapultepec Golf Club.

Memegen

COMMENTARY

Venezuela’s economic disintegration has wrought severe shortages. Food, medicine, electricity. And now – ¡cónchale, chamo! – even Polar beer.

But there might be one scarcity above all others keeping President Nicolás Maduro awake and sweaty at night.

It’s a shortage of scapegoats. Especially U.S. scapegoats.

Courtesy Rolling Stone via Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

I’d like to take acclaimed film actor and ridiculed crime writer Sean Penn to San Pedro Sula, Honduras, which until recently suffered the highest homicide rate of any city on the planet.

I’d like him to meet the families of the thousands of victims murdered by the maras, or narco-mafias, that are tied to Mexico’s powerful Sinaloa drug cartel.

David von Blohn/AP

The lake is the Nezahualcoyotl reservoir, created when the local Grijalva River was dammed back in 1966. The church ended up submerged under water.

But now it's visible again, as the reservoir's waters have receded. The reservoir's level has dropped by more than 80 feet because of a long drought.

Eight months ago, Mexico's first lady, Angélica Rivera, known for her fondness of designer clothes and European vacations, made a public promise to sell a multimillion-dollar mansion bought under controversial circumstances. She purchased the home, at below market rates, from a contractor with lucrative connections to her husband.

The scandal has been one of the biggest to rock President Enrique Peña Nieto's administration. Months later, many questions remain regarding the purchase — and Rivera has yet to sell the house.

Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement.

In June's midterm elections in Mexico, voter turnout was higher than expected. Surveys showed that voters were voicing frustrations with drug cartel violence and corruption. But an increasing number of Mexicans cannot wait for electoral changes to improve their situation. They see leaving as the only option.

One asylum-seeker, Constantino Morales, fled Mexico and settled in Iowa. But once in the US, he was met by a host of new challenges that Mexicans face when it comes to obtaining asylum.

Jeff Bottari / AP

Commentary

Like most attention-craving clowns, Donald Trump has to turn up his asinine rhetoric on a regular basis.

Last week, while announcing his presidential run, he hurled uber-asinine insults at Mexico – calling migrants from our southern neighbor “drug dealers, rapists and murderers.”

We should of course condemn the Comb-Over King for that kind of anti-Latino bigotry.

But I gotta admit: Part of me also wonders if The Donald might be doing Mexico and Latin America a strange but welcome favor.

As far as I’m concerned, one of the year’s most important Latin American stories happened this week in China.

Yep, communist China. On Monday the government’s Internet watchdragon, known as the Great Firewall, pulled the plug on Gmail because it's a subversive instrument of free speech and dissent.

In the process, Beijing affirmed President Obama’s historic decision this month to pursue a policy of engagement with communist Cuba.

Edward Garza / Mexican-American Council

South Florida’s best known Christmas traditions involve food. La caja china. Hallacas. But one of the richest customs involves street theater – plus a really cool donkey named Paco – and it reflects the increasingly important role Mexicans play in this region today.

Pedro Portal / El Nuevo Herald

When I met Mexican telecom tycoon Carlos Slim six years ago, he was the world’s richest man.

Slim, however, wasn’t the world’s most generous giver. He was called the Latin American Scrooge because he’d steered such a relatively small share of his then $65 billion fortune to philanthropic causes. In our interview at his Mexico City office, he said he was correcting that – and he read a passage from “The Prophet” by the Christian philosopher Kahlil Gibran:

“Give now, that the season of giving may be yours and not your inheritors’.”

Day Donaldson and Edgar Alberto Domínguez Cataño / Flickr

Coincidence or communiqué?

When President Obama issued his executive action on immigration last week, including his decision to halt the deportations of millions of undocumented immigrants, some of his foes noted the date: Nov. 20.

Nov. 20 commemorates the start of the Mexican Revolution 104 years ago. So Americans for Legal Immigration PAC wondered if the president purposely chose that day as a way of “comparing his new immigration orders to the violent Mexican revolution and civil war.”

Edgar Alberto Dominguez Cataño / Flickr

After weeks of angry protests in Mexico, President Enrique Peña Nieto will reportedly announce major changes to the country’s police and justice systems on Thursday. U.S. and Florida politicians are also worried about the Mexican crisis, as is the nation's representative in Miami. 

Mexicans in Miami Show Solidarity With Protests in Mexico

Nov 21, 2014
Constanza Gallardo / WLRN

Since 43 college students went missing in Ayotzinapa, Mexico, back in September, hundreds of protests have filled the streets throughout that country. The students are presumed by many to have been murdered.

From Mexico City to Miami, protesters gathered in front of Mexican government offices and consulates Thursday, voicing their frustration in the case of the missing students. 

Protesters in Miami were wearing black and holding candles and signs with messages against their country’s government.

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