Melania Trump

The White House announced today that President Trump's youngest son, 11-year-old Barron, will attend the private St. Andrew's Episcopal School in Potomac, Md., this fall.

Barron and his mother, Melania Trump, have been living at Trump Tower in New York throughout Trump's presidency. The announcement ends speculation that they would remain in New York during the entire presidency; Barron will be the first presidential son to live at the White House since John F. Kennedy, Jr.

It is perhaps no surprise that first lady Melania Trump's first official portrait is a glamour shot. The former model's bio page on the White House website goes into great detail about her career in the field.

The White House released the photo on Monday, with a simple press release stating that the photo was taken in the residence at the White House.

"I am honored to serve in the role of First Lady, and look forward to working on behalf of the American people over the coming years," Trump says in the announcement.

Charles Trainor Jr. / Miami Herald

Out-of-towners flock to Palm Beach in the winter. The gentle sounds of the sea lapping the shore, the lush green golf courses, the shopping, and the winter temperatures in the 70s and higher attract snowbirds from all over the country.

It's a little icky all around.

First lady Melania Trump is seeking $150 million from the Daily Mail newspaper, charging in a lawsuit filed Monday in New York state commercial court that the outlet published damaging and unfounded allegations that she once worked as an "elite escort" in the "sex business."

From head to toe, a first lady's look is heavily scrutinized, and Melania Trump will be no exception. But Trump is no stranger to the spotlight: In 2005, she was on the cover of Vogue in her Dior wedding dress, and she's modeled for Harper's Bazaar and posed nude for GQ. She also once sold her own line of costume jewelry and watches on QVC.

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Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

There is a small undocumented workforce that's almost exclusively white. And they're far from the shadows — they're plastered atop billboards, spread across magazine covers and strutting down the catwalks.

It is, by all appearances, a glamorous industry. But many of the international models fueling a $385.7 billion fashion industry in the US are working without papers. They come from the Netherlands, Russia, Brazil, Australia, Canada and Europe.

In a photo for GQ earlier this year, Melania Trump sat in a white dress at a white table posed with a fork and spoon, twirling a thick platinum rope necklace in a bowl like a piece of bucatini.