medical marijuana

House, Senate Down To Wire On Medical Marijuana

May 5, 2017

With just one day left to pass a bill, House and Senate Republican leaders are still struggling to strike a deal on the rollout of a voter-approved constitutional amendment legalizing marijuana for patients with debilitating conditions.

House Approves Medical Marijuana Measure

May 3, 2017

The state would have more than a dozen pot operators — with unlimited retail locations — under a proposal overwhelmingly approved by the Florida House on Tuesday.

As legislators work out the details of implementing medical marijuana, pharmacists at the University of South Florida (USF) are determining how to deliver it as medication.

The problem is, not a lot of clinical research has been done on the topic.

Dr. Kevin Sneed, dean of the USF College of Pharmacy, hopes to fix that. He wants to make the school the medical marijuana research hub in Florida.

During a symposium on the subject, Sneed and others discussed how research is needed to determine the appropriate dosage and the best methods for delivery of the drug.

Medical Marijuana Bill Headed To Full House

Apr 25, 2017

A House medical-marijuana plan sponsored by Majority Leader Ray Rodrigues is ready for a floor vote after a key committee approved the proposal (HB 1397) late Monday afternoon.

Senate Looks To Add Medical Marijuana Licenses

Apr 4, 2017

With the bill sponsor saying it "faithfully" carries out a constitutional amendment that voters passed in November, a Senate committee Monday approved a bill that would revamp Florida's medical-marijuana laws.

House Panel Pushes Forward On Medical Marijuana

Mar 29, 2017

Pledging that it is only a start, a Florida House panel gave a thumbs-up Tuesday to a medical-marijuana proposal castigated by supporters of a constitutional amendment that legalized cannabis for a broad swath of patients with debilitating conditions.

Senate Set To Put Together Marijuana Plan

Mar 23, 2017

More growers, access to treatment for snowbirds and greater flexibility in the relationship between patients and doctors are among the items likely to be included in a Senate proposal to carry out a constitutional amendment approved by voters in November to broadly legalize medical marijuana.

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Florida senators will begin hashing out possible medical marijuana laws this week.

Florida health officials who oversee the medical marijuana program have started processing identification card applications for patients and caregivers.


Three months after Florida voters overwhelmingly approved a constitutional amendment on medical marijuana, state health officials and prospective pot-seeking patients are at odds over proposed rules that would spell out who could get marijuana.

The Department of Health is spending the week on the road—taking comment on new rules for the medical cannabis industry.

One of the most contentious elements in Florida’s medical cannabis industry is who gets to grow and sell the drug.  Lawmakers approved a limited number of companies to ensure security, but now some see the state’s seven growers as a cartel.

New Medical Marijuana Rules Criticized

Jan 18, 2017

Authors of Florida's voter-approved constitutional amendment that broadly legalized medical marijuana are blasting proposed rules to regulate the cannabis industry.

So far, more than half of all U.S. states have legalized marijuana for medical use, and eight (plus the District of Columbia) have legalized the drug for recreational use. Varieties of cannabis available today are more potent than ever and come in many forms, including oils and leaves that can be vaped, and lots of edibles, from brownies and cookies to candies — even cannabis gummy bears.

Patients who qualify for medical marijuana under a voter-approved constitutional amendment can start purchasing cannabis treatments in as little as 90 days, according to the state's top pot cop.

Whether patients would be able to start buying medical marijuana before the Department of Health approves rules to carry out the amendment — a process that could take at least six months --- has been a source of confusion for many doctors, patients and businesses.

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