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The Florida House has passed a bill that creates the “Right to Try Act.”  The legislation gives dying patients a chance to try treatments that have undergone clinical trials but haven’t been approved by the Food and Drug Administration.  

Patients who’ve been diagnosed as having less than a year to live would be eligible for the experimental treatments.

Marijuana Rule Hit with Two More Challenges

Mar 31, 2015

A Central Florida nursery and a trade association this week filed legal challenges to a state Department of Health proposal to carry out a new law allowing limited types of medical marijuana.

This comes as lawmakers have expressed impatience with the delays in carrying out the 2014 law allowing the types of medical marijuana. It spurred the Senate Regulated Industries Committee this week to approve a bill (SB 7066) aimed at jump-starting the process.

The divide between Republicans and Democrats on pot politics is narrowing, President Barack Obama said in an interview Monday.

  Delays continue for the rules on the state's legalized low-THC marijuana extract known as "Charlotte's Web," the Orlando Sentine

Florida is getting closer to allowing doctors to prescribe medical marijuana.

But first, rules for how to grow the non-euphoric strain of the drug have to be hashed out — and that’s what a committee will be discussing over the next two days in Tallahassee.

There's a new push to legalize medical marijuana in Florida, and a Republican lawmaker is leading the charge.

Though a constitutional amendment to legalize medical marijuana failed in November, Republican lawmaker state Sen. Jeff Brandes has filed a bill to make medical marijuana legal for Florida residents.

"Amendment Two really was kind of a take-it-or-leave-it offer," said Brandes, R-St. Petersburg. 

Proponents of medical marijuana began an encore campaign for legalization Friday, filing a rewritten ballot measure just two months after one narrowly failed to pass.

Backers of the initial constitutional amendment appeared to have a wave of support on their side, but fell short of the 60 percent threshold needed as a surge of ads emerged claiming the measure's language was riddled with holes.

The state government and the marijuana industry in Colorado are working to educate people about how to use pot safely. But in the high Rockies, one community is taking matters into its own hands.

The local sheriff in Aspen is leading an education effort that targets skiers and snowboarders flocking to the winter resort. And the sheriff isn't waiting until visitors hit the slopes — their education starts at the airport with pamphlets on marijuana.

In the midterm elections earlier this month in Florida, the constitutional amendment to allow for the distribution of medical marijuana needed 60 percent of the vote to pass.

Amendment Two received 57.6 percent.

Supporters of medical marijuana may have lost their fight at the ballot box, but they're promising to take it back to the statehouse.

A day after Amendment 2 narrowly failed in Florida, the chairman and chief financier of the initiative said Wednesday that if lawmakers didn't successfully pursue the issue, it would be back before voters in 2016.

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