Katie Lepri / WLRN

Obamacare’s namesake came to Miami-Dade County Thursday afternoon to talk about the Affordable Care Act, just a few weeks before the program’s fourth open enrollment period starts.

President Barack Obama, before heading to a Hillary Clinton campaign rally in Miami Gardens, spoke to a large crowd of mostly students at Miami Dade College Wolfson Campus.

Privately insured people with cancer were diagnosed earlier and lived longer than those who were uninsured or were covered by Medicaid, according to two recent studies.

Gina Jordan/WLRN

House minority leader Mark Pafford, D-West Palm Beach, is finishing up his last regular legislative session.

He's leaving because of term limits. "This process is better when you have new minds and fresh ideas," Pafford says. For the record, he doesn't like term limits and calls his departure an "involuntary constitutional resignation." 

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Right now, almost a million people in Florida don’t qualify for Medicaid because they make too much money or don’t have any dependents. But they also make too little money to get help buying health insurance through the Affordable Care Act. The resulting space between the two programs is often called the Medicaid coverage gap.

Medicaid Spending Soars — Mostly In Expansion States

Oct 21, 2015

Medicaid spending soared nearly 14 percent last year—its biggest annual increase in at least two decades—as a result of millions of newly eligible low-income enrollees signing up under the Affordable Care Act, according to a report released Thursday by the Kaiser Family Foundation.

Children who get health insurance through Medicaid go to the dentist about half as often as children in Florida who have private insurance, according to a new study out from the American Dental Association and the Health Policy Institute.

Eleonora Edreva / WLRN

Medicare and Medicaid were established 50 years ago on July 30.

To celebrate the occasion, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) had an event at Florida International University to reflect on the impact of the programs during the past half century, as well as look forward at how they can keep expanding and improving.

The event was themed as a birthday party, with a performance by a group of dancers from Little Havana and cake for everyone once the speakers were done.

Tim Padgett / WLRN

How will Florida keep paying healthcare costs for its poor and uninsured? That issue has brought the state legislative session to a halt. But it’s getting public hearings this week. On Thursday, the Florida Agency for Healthcare Administration brought the discussion to Doral - and South Floridians are especially anxious.

Florida’s $2 billion low-income pool – or LIP – is a joint federal-state program that reimburses hospitals for treating uninsured patients. The feds want the state to end LIP and instead expand access to Medicaid for some 850,000 Floridians under Obamacare.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

This is the fourth and final part of our series, Falling Into The Gap, in collaboration with the Miami Herald. Read more about the coverage gap and find affordable care on

Cynthia Louis is a big fan of President Obama. A collage of pictures of the president is propped up against the living room wall along with pictures of her children and a certificate of appreciation from her church.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Gov. Rick Scott To Sue Feds Over Hospital Funding, Medicaid Expansion

Apr 16, 2015
Flickr/Creative Commons

Republican Gov. Rick Scott plans to sue the federal government for allegedly coercing Florida to expand Medicaid, his office said Thursday.

"It is appalling that President Obama would cut off federal healthcare dollars to Florida in an effort to force our state further into Obamacare," Scott said in a statement.

The announcement is but the latest round in an ongoing spat between Scott and the feds.

'Young Invincibles' Demand Medicaid

Apr 16, 2015
401(K) 2012 / Flickr/Creative Commons

  The "Young Invincibles" is an ironic demographic designation for young people who think they will never get sick, will never buy health insurance and will therefore bring down Obamacare.

But Cristina Calvillo-Rivera, representing the actual Young Invincibles organization, says Florida's 300,000 people of ages 18 through 34 do want care, are less likely to get it, and more likely to have medical debt.

Florida Roundup: U.S. And Cuba At The Summit

Apr 10, 2015

  On the Florida Roundup, we discuss the week's top news with area journalists. 

Summit of the Americas

The State Department recommended this week removing Cuba from the U.S. list of countries that sponsor terrorism - a move that could speed up normalizing relations with the island. Though no formal announcement has been made yet to remove Cuba from the list, Obama said a decision on it would be soon. The two leaders will be together at the Summit of the Americas for the first time.

Presidential Aspirations