mass shooting

The creator of a school shooting video game that was protested by parents of slain children says it's up and running again after being removed by a website host.

Matthew Peddie / WMFE

In the wake of the shooting at Pulse, the community responded in different ways. Some gave blood, some left memorial items and others chose to honor the victims with tattoos. 

At a tattoo studio in downtown Orlando recently, survivor Yvens Carrenard got a tattoo of a woman’s face with a leopard head-dress.

“It’s always going to remind me to be strong, you know, remind to keep fighting, remind me to make my life something, because there were people that were taken away from us for no reason,” said Carrenard.

An upcoming computer video game that would allow players to re-create school shootings by stalking school hallways and racking up kills has been condemned as insensitive and inappropriate by the parents of students who were shot to death during the massacre at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School.

One of the parents to address the investigating commission was Fred Guttenberg, shown here speaking at an event on April 9, who lost his daughter Jaime during the Feb. 14 shooting at Stoneman Douglas High.
Associated Press

The families of two students who were killed in the Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School shooting in Parkland have filed a lawsuit in Florida against American Outdoor Brands and Sunrise Tactical Supply, the manufacturer and vendor of the firearm that killed their children.

The suit is being brought by the families of Jamie Guttenburg, 14, and Alex Schachter, 14, who both died in the tragedy.

Editor's Note: This post contains graphic descriptions.

"At first we thought it was fireworks."

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

On the afternoon of Feb. 14, Fawn Patterson got a call from her daughter telling her to come to the hospital.

Miami Herald

Broward Schools Superintendent Robert Runcie is facing questions about honesty and transparency – so much so that he opened a community forum Monday by stating that he was not a liar.

Miami Herald File

A military veteran charged with killing five people and wounding six others at the Fort Lauderdale airport last year will plead guilty in exchange for not facing the death penalty, prosecutors said Tuesday.

Prosecutors disclosed their decision after U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions weighed in on the death penalty question in the murder trial of 27-year-old Esteban Santiago. Sessions, who had final say, received input from prosecutors and defense attorneys in South Florida as well as a panel of experts at the Justice Department in Washington, D.C.

Updated at 10:05 p.m.

Nashville Police are warning residents to keep their doors locked and their eyes open for a partially nude man following a shooting early Sunday morning that left four people dead.

There is reason to believe, police say, that the suspect at large is carrying at least one weapon that was not found during a search of the gunman's home.

"One of his guns, a pistol, remains unaccounted for," Metro Nashville Police tweeted Sunday evening.

Parents of two children killed in the Sandy Hook Elementary School attacks filed defamation lawsuits on Monday against right-wing conspiracy theorist and radio show host Alex Jones, who has questioned the authenticity of the 2012 shooting that left 26 dead, including 20 children.

Leonard Pozner and his former wife, Veronique De La Rosa, parents of Noah Pozner, and Neil Heslin, the father of Jesse Lewis, are seeking more than $1 million in damages in separate lawsuits.

Updated at 7:20 p.m. ET

Police questioned Nasim Aghdam in her car just hours before she opened fire on YouTube headquarters on Tuesday, wounding three people and apparently killing herself, the Associated Press reported.

Updated at 3:40 a.m. ET on Wednesday

A woman with an apparent grudge against YouTube for what she claimed was censoring and de-monetizing her videos, opened fire at the video-sharing service's San Bruno, Calif., headquarters, wounding several people before fatally shooting herself, according to police.

Catherine Welch / WMFE

A federal judge dismissed a lawsuit filed against Facebook, Google and Twitter by families of patrons killed in the 2016 Orlando, Florida, nightclub massacre.

In his ruling, U.S. District Judge David Lawson found no legal merit for the case filed in December 2016 in Detroit by the families of Tevin Crosby, Juan Ramon Guerrero Jr., Javier Jorge-Reyes and others. They claimed gunman Omar Mateen was radicalized by propaganda found through social media.

In Florida, only the state is allowed to regulate firearms. Local government officials who ignore that law — posting signs prohibiting guns in city parks, for example — face stiff penalties. They include removal from office, a $5,000 fine officials must pay from their personal funds, and lawsuits from any person or group affected.

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