Marco Rubio

South Carolina Seen As Crucial For Bush

Feb 18, 2016
NADA / Flickr

  The presidential campaign of former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush has pulled out all stops in South Carolina. It’s been a family affair with the  matriarch, Barbara Bush, hitting the trail and former President George W. Bush coming out of retirement to stump for his brother.

  That has Bush supporters, like South Florida Congressman Mario Diaz-Balart, saying calls for him to exit the race are premature. 

Rubio's Take On Social Security And Medicare

Feb 9, 2016
Amika Osumi

 

 

The first in the nation New Hampshire primary is Tuesday.  

 

During this week’s home stretch, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio gave roughly the same remarks at all his events.

 

However, at his rally in Derry, New Hampshire Rubio cracked a joke about his home state to bring up an issue.

 

“You might not know this, this is not well known,” he said. “In Florida there are a lot of people on Social Security and Medicare.”

 

The crowd laughed at his reference to his home state.

 

MOLLY RILEY (Rubio), CHARLES KRUPA (Bush) / Miami Herald

Tuesday is the New Hampshire primary. Among Democrats, Sen. Bernie Sanders holds a significant lead over former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. On the other side, Donald Trump holds a double-digit lead, followed by Marco Rubio and Ted Cruz. What do New Hampshire voters want and consider their top issues? How different are they from Florida voters or Iowa voters? Patricia Mazzei, political reporter for the Miami Herald, has been following the Rubio and Jeb Bush campaigns. 

The issue of Iranian hostages was back in the news recently - the hostages from way back in 1980. U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Florida, brought up Ronald Reagan's role in their release. WUSF's Steve Newborn talks about that and Jeb Bush's claim that he reduced the number of teens using heroin with Amy Hollyfield of PolitiFact Florida.

Relations with Iran have been in the headlines recently, with the relaxation of sanctions in light of the deal to curb the development of nuclear weapons in the rogue nation.

Andrew Harnik / Associated Press

Before ringing in the New Year, we take a look back at 2015 national politics and politics in the Sunshine State.

 

It was a critical year for Democrats and Republicans running in the presidential race. From spring through summer, more than 20 major party candidates started campaigning as presidential hopefuls. Four of them have personal connections to Florida: Jeb Bush, Donald Trump, Marco Rubio and Ben Carson.

 

As Marco Rubio campaigns for the Republican presidential nomination, he's pledging to bring generational change to Washington. Yet Rubio's policy toward Cuba hinges on reinstating a half-century-old diplomatic freeze that failed to unseat the communist government on the island where his parents were born.

The Florida senator sees no contradiction between his pledge to usher in new ideas and his call to restore an old, punitive relationship with Cuba.

In his race for the White House, Former Governor Bush has hit many bumps in the road, so he’s tossing some new tires on the campaign bus. Under the new anthem of “Jeb Can Fix It,” Bush is trying to shake off some of the criticisms that have left him down in the polls. South Florida Republican Carlos Curbelo says he has no regrets about supporting Bush so early.

“No not at all look I supported the candidate that I think is best prepared to be president of the United States and he’s now retooling his campaign. He’s going to relaunch it and looking forward to that,” Curbelo says.

Sen. Marco Rubio clarified his view on the 11 million immigrants, who are in the United States illegally. The day after a presidential debate, which exposed a continuing divide in the Republican Party on immigration, Rubio told NPR on Wednesday that he favors a path to citizenship for some, though the prospect would be very distant.

Former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush will be feeling the heat again in Tuesday evening's debate as he tries to rebound from a disappointing performance last month that renewed questions about his viability.

"I think there's going to be a lot of pressure on Jeb," predicted Katie Packer Gage, who was Mitt Romney's deputy campaign manager in 2012. "He put some pressure on himself by telling people he's going to get better and work on his debate performance. I think this is kind of a make-or-break moment for him to really step up what he's been able to do in previous debates."

Anyone who has watched any of the presidential debates knows the claims have been flying around fast and furious. So we're going to take on some of those claims from the recent debate in Boulder, Colorado, from the Florida-based candidates in a bit of a lightning round with Josh Gillen of PolitiFact Florida.

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