Local News

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Lannis Waters / The Palm Beach Post

More than two dozen Palm Beach County public schools will be offering free meals to children and their families on Thursday and Friday to ensure access to nutritious meals as schools work to reopen after Hurricane Irma.

The 27 campuses will serve breakfast and lunch to anyone under 18, along with their adult caretakers, the school district said. Breakfasts will be served from 7:30 to 9 a.m. and lunch will be served from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

Hurricane Irma evacuees trying to return home can breathe a little easier.

The Florida Department of Transportation said Thursday the state will not have to close a portion of Interstate 75 in Alachua County, as Santa Fe River flooding has started to recede.

“As of this morning, FDOT engineers and state meteorologists do not believe that the Santa Fe River will reach a level to make the interstate unsafe,” a news release from the Department of Transportation and the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles said.

David Santiago / El Nuevo Herald

Miami Dade County Public Schools will hand out thousands of free meals to families on Thursday.

“In the wake of Hurricane Irma, many in our community are struggling to meet basic needs,” the district wrote in a press release.

Nursing Home Where 8 Died In Sweltering Heat Had Poor Record With State Regulators

Sep 14, 2017
Emily Michot / Miami Herald

A Hollywood nursing home with a troubled history became a sweltering death trap Wednesday when a portable air cooler malfunctioned. Before the day was over, eight residents lay dead.

Memorial Regional Hospital’s emergency room was directly across the street.

Hollywood police have begun a criminal investigation into the deaths at Rehabilitation Center of Hollywood Hills. The Agency for Health Care Administration and the Department of Children & Families have begun their own investigations.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Days after Hurricane Irma battered South Florida, Rufus James walked through his Liberty City neighborhood in Miami looking for paid work to chop down trees and clean up yards.

Like many Floridians, James, 57, was going on day four with no electricity. At home, he had three grandchildren to feed. They’re eating “cornflakes and whatever we can come up with. I’m looking for some food,” he said.

Before the storm, James said he worked odd jobs — helping elderly neighbors mow their lawns or move heavy items. Post storm, no one was paying for help yet.

Peter Haden / WLRN News

The city of Clewiston sits on the south shore of Lake Okeechobee. It’s one of the best places in the country to snag a largemouth bass.

But in the days after Irma, people are flooding Clewiston to fish for something else: gas.

C.M. GUERRERO. / Miami Herald

As hundreds of thousands of people in South Florida remain without power in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, many people are figuring out how to proceed. Here are answers to some of the questions you’ve been asking, including ones about where to get ice, where to dispose of debris and how long your refrigerator can stay cool. 

In the wake of Hurricane Irma, many Floridians are turning to Waffle House, as one of the few places to get a cup of coffee or a cell phone charge. But as the state begins rebuilding, the restaurant is taking on an even greater significance.

Rain and power outages from Hurricane Irma led to sewage spills across Florida, according to the Department of Environmental Protection.

Alexandra Clough / Palm Beach Post

The city of Boca Raton suffered “several million dollars” worth of damage to its beaches from Hurricane Irma, Mayor Susan Haynie said Wednesday.

 

“The dunes got crushed,” said Chrissy Gibson, city spokeswoman. 

In addition, 49 percent of the city remained without power as of noon on Wednesday, Gibson said.

 

The city, like the rest of county, is slated to have its power restored by Sunday, Gibson said. In the interim, the county’s midnight to 6 a.m. curfew will be enforced in the city.

 

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The Internal Revenue Service is extending deadlines for taxpayers in 21 Florida counties affected by Hurricane Irma, including Palm Beach County.

Taxpayers now have until Jan. 31 to file some individual and business tax returns and to make certain payments, the IRS said.

 

For instance, the IRS is giving taxpayers extra time to make quarterly estimated payments for 2017 normally due Sept. 15 and Jan. 16.  

Meanwhile, taxpayers who filed extensions until Sept. 15 or Oct. 16 have until Jan. 31 to file their 2016 returns.

Tom Urban/News Service of Florida

As homebound evacuees clog interstates, Gov. Rick Scott says food, water and fuel are also heading to South Florida.

Scott told reporters Tuesday afternoon at the state Emergency Operations Center in Tallahassee that the biggest push underway is to get the power on.

 

“I know we have over 30,000 linemen here and people that’ll clean up debris for them, along with the people that already work at our companies," Scott said.

The state also needs the ports fully operational in order to deliver fuel. 

C.M. Guerrero / Miami Herald

Florida Power & Light officials say it could be more than 10 days before power is restored to all customers who are in the dark due to Hurricane Irma.

FP&L spokesperson Rob Gould said restoration to nearly all customers in the eastern half of the state should be completed by Sunday night.

The company expects power to be restored to western Florida — more heavily damaged by the storm — by Sept. 22.

8 Dead, Others Evacuated At Hollywood Nursing Home Without Power After Irma

Sep 13, 2017
CAITLIN OSTROFF / Miami Herald

Eight Hollywood nursing home residents died Wednesday morning in a building left without air conditioning after Irma blasted South Florida, according to authorities at the scene.


Florida fruit growers and farmers have just barely begun to assess the damage Hurricane Irma wrought on the state's citrus, sugar cane and vegetable crops — but they expect it will be significant.

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