Little Havana

Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

Days before ABC canceled Roseanne Barr’s sitcom this week because of her racist slur on Twitter, a Little Havana theater had to cancel a racist slur onstage.

Fidel Castro is dead and brother Raúl is no longer president of Cuba. But communism can still move the needle in Miami campaigns.

Decades after the Cuban revolution spawned an exodus that reshaped South Florida culture and U.S. politics in the Caribbean, political exiles are declining in number in Miami and leftist angst is fading. But it's far from gone. And under the right conditions and in the right neighborhoods, evoking the tyranny of dictators can still be an effective tactic in manipulating votes and undercutting opponents.

Holly Pretsky / WLRN

Despite some scheduling issues, the third annual Gay8 festival is still on. 

Organizers threatened to cancel the event altogether and boycott city of Miami events after they realized a January date they wanted for the festival had been given to the Three Kings Parade. 

Little Havana Businesses Prepare For MLB All-Star Game Celebrations

Jul 7, 2017
Adrianne Gonzalez / WLRN News

In the Little Havana neighborhood around Marlins Park, handymen are fixing lighting fixtures and shopkeepers are cleaning corners — all in hopes of attracting some of the 110,000 people expected to attend the 2017 Major League Baseball All-Star Game.

David Lopez, an employee at New York Pizza across the street from Marlins Park, says that the business will be open longer hours with more employees at hand. He helps run the small pizza joint at the front of the house and in the kitchen. 

Allison Light / WLRN

Residents of Little Havana pulled together to raise money and collected much-needed items Venezuela on Thursday. The oil-rich South American country is suffering from a severe economic collapse and a chronic shortage of food and medicine.

"Everything is needed. It's unbelievable," said Venezuelan Alfredo Rodriguez. He is one of the owners of El Jaleo de la Ocho, a Cuban restaurant on Southwest Eighth Street that hosted the fundraiser. He splits his time between his hometown of Caracas, the capital of Venezuela, and Miami.

Sebastian Ballestas / Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

President Trump's speech in Little Havana last Friday wasn’t about remaking America’s Cuba policy. It was about reliving the Cuban-American past.

It was an exile Woodstock reunion, a nostalgic return to a time when Miami Cubans (and their impressive voter turnout) convinced Washington to isolate communist Cuba. Back to the years when they tightened the economic and diplomatic screws until the head slots stripped – certain it would drive the Castro dictatorship from their mother island.

Courtsey HistoryMiami Museum/Barlington Group

Earlier this year the National Trust for Historic Preservation designated Miami’s Little Havana neighborhood a national treasure. Now Little Havana is getting its own museum, on – where else? – Calle Ocho.

Courtesy National Trust for Historic Preservation

The National Trust for Historic Preservation added Miami’s Little Havana Neighborhood to its list of “National Treasures,"  which contains more than 75 buildings, neighborhoods and natural landscapes threatened by development or neglect.

The only other treasure from Florida is another Miami landmark, the Miami Marine Stadium.

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

News of Fidel Castro’s death sent Cuban exiles old and young into the streets of Little Havana early this morning. Both generations recall Castro with a sense of betrayal - and his demise with a sense of hope.

80-year-old Ana Celia watched fellow Cuban exiles dance a conga line in front of the Versailles restaurant in Little Havana - some of them holding signs that read, "Go to Hell Fidel."

Kyle Holsten / WLRN

Some South Florida voters took to social media to complain that there weren't enough Spanish speakers working at the polls in neighborhoods that needed them the most.

Roger Lords was voting at Precinct 669 in  Little Havana at  Miami Central Seventh Day Adventist Church when he noticed that older voters were asking  poll workers questions in Spanish and the questions were not being answered adequately. He posted to social media about it and WLRN received the tip through ProPublica's ElectionLand Project

Calle Ocho Receives A Million-Dollar Makeover

Mar 17, 2016
John Power / WLRN

The mayor of Miami, Tomas Regalado, announced Thursday a new $1 million project to enhance Calle Ocho.

The project will consist of extending the plaza where the iconic Domino Park is located on Southwest 15th Avenue to the north side of Eighth Street. Also, the mayor has plans for building new sidewalks, planting trees along the sidewalk to provide shade for pedestrians and a new innovative trash can.  Yes, trash can.

The trash can displays local artists’ art on its side and is immune to graffiti—the first of its kind.

PlusUrbia / Courtesy

Change may be coming to Calle Ocho.

In the 1960s, the street running through the heart of Little Havana was transformed from a small neighborhood road to a one-way, three-lane highway intended to alleviate traffic flowing downtown. 

As a result, cars have reigned supreme, taking away the pedestrian-friendly atmosphere the street used have.

Daniel Ducassi

An earlier version of this story incorrectly identified the owner of Cantelop Property Investment, Inc., as Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Cantera. The property owner is the lieutenant governor's father, Carlos C. Lopez-Cantera Sr. Friday, Feb. 27, 4:01 p.m.

A zoning proposal meant to spur redevelopment in Little Havana would benefit some well-heeled, well-connected men.

Jessica Meszaros / WLRN

Several hundred protesters gathered at Jose Marti Park in Little Havana Saturday. They wanted President Obama to know that they do not support the U.S.'s new policy towards Cuba.

Protesters waving Cuban flags and hand-written signs surrounded the stage at the park. They calmly listened to personal stories and opinions from whoever grabbed the microphone.

Elaine Chen

When I got an email from my daughter’s preschool, titled "Snow Day!" I was confused. In the Northeast, where I grew up, snow days mean the school is closed. 

On the other hand in South Florida, a somewhat common winter tradition is for schools to pay to haul in snow. What kid doesn't like snow? Well, it wasn't a big hit among these 1 year-olds at a preschool in Little Havana. 

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