Little Havana

Kyle Holsten / WLRN

Some South Florida voters took to social media to complain that there weren't enough Spanish speakers working at the polls in neighborhoods that needed them the most.

Roger Lords was voting at Precinct 669 in  Little Havana at  Miami Central Seventh Day Adventist Church when he noticed that older voters were asking  poll workers questions in Spanish and the questions were not being answered adequately. He posted to social media about it and WLRN received the tip through ProPublica's ElectionLand Project

Calle Ocho Receives A Million-Dollar Makeover

Mar 17, 2016
John Power / WLRN

The mayor of Miami, Tomas Regalado, announced Thursday a new $1 million project to enhance Calle Ocho.

The project will consist of extending the plaza where the iconic Domino Park is located on Southwest 15th Avenue to the north side of Eighth Street. Also, the mayor has plans for building new sidewalks, planting trees along the sidewalk to provide shade for pedestrians and a new innovative trash can.  Yes, trash can.

The trash can displays local artists’ art on its side and is immune to graffiti—the first of its kind.

PlusUrbia / Courtesy

Change may be coming to Calle Ocho.

In the 1960s, the street running through the heart of Little Havana was transformed from a small neighborhood road to a one-way, three-lane highway intended to alleviate traffic flowing downtown. 

As a result, cars have reigned supreme, taking away the pedestrian-friendly atmosphere the street used have.

Daniel Ducassi

An earlier version of this story incorrectly identified the owner of Cantelop Property Investment, Inc., as Lt. Gov. Carlos Lopez-Cantera. The property owner is the lieutenant governor's father, Carlos C. Lopez-Cantera Sr. Friday, Feb. 27, 4:01 p.m.

A zoning proposal meant to spur redevelopment in Little Havana would benefit some well-heeled, well-connected men.

Jessica Meszaros / WLRN

Several hundred protesters gathered at Jose Marti Park in Little Havana Saturday. They wanted President Obama to know that they do not support the U.S.'s new policy towards Cuba.

Protesters waving Cuban flags and hand-written signs surrounded the stage at the park. They calmly listened to personal stories and opinions from whoever grabbed the microphone.

Elaine Chen

When I got an email from my daughter’s preschool, titled "Snow Day!" I was confused. In the Northeast, where I grew up, snow days mean the school is closed. 

On the other hand in South Florida, a somewhat common winter tradition is for schools to pay to haul in snow. What kid doesn't like snow? Well, it wasn't a big hit among these 1 year-olds at a preschool in Little Havana. 

Enrique Torres / WLRN

In Hialeah’s Power Food Supermarket, a lottery cashier named Isabel takes a pause between customers.

In nine years working at the store, she has seen many hopeful people play the different Florida lottery games. The 1 in 10,000 chances of winning big with a Play 4 ticket might seem disheartening, but Isabel knows about a Cuban lottery superstition that ignores the statistics.

“I used to live in the apartments on 49th Street and a white dove stood by my window all night,” she recalls. “Because I knew about the dove, I played 0024 on Play 4 that day and I won $10,000.”

Little Havana Serves As Backdrop For 'UltraVox' Opera

Jul 25, 2013

Opera doesn’t always happen in an opera house. Sometimes it happens on Calle Ocho. “UltraVox,” conceived, directed and performed by tenor Santo Martin Cordero and soprano Eloisa M. Ferrer, runs August 2-3 at the intimate SIR Studio on Calle Ocho in Miami’s Little Havana.

“The artist is an inventive and daring individual who upsets and disturbs, enlightens and seeks a better understanding of the self and the world,” said Cordero. “We weave song, movement and spoken word during this interdisciplinary performance.”

Junior Henry / Flickr, Creative Commons

The public funding in the Marlins stadium deal has been called one of the biggest boondoggles in sports history. But hardly any stadium now is built with only private funds. Why do governments fund these facilities?

On April 1, opening day of Marlins' season, Rick Horrow with WLRN-Miami Herald News hosted a special roundtable, Foul Ball! The Future of the Marlins in Miami, a two-hour radio special on the impact of the Marlins stadium deal. Some of the guests included:

Four Musical Ways People Celebrated Hugo Chavez's Death

Mar 6, 2013
Brenda Medina / El Nuevo Herald

All Tuesday night, we listened to South Floridians react to the death of Hugo Chavez. Many (most) of the reactions were celebratory. Those celebrations took the form of songs, drive-by shoutings and apparently an accordion death ballad.

Below is a roundup of the most colorful reactions to the death of Venezuela's oft-beloved and perhaps equally hated leader.