Little Haiti

Nadege Green / WLRN

The faithful stand with their arms outstretched.

“If God has saved you, scream out, ‘There is a God,’ ” a speaker yells into a microphone.

The crowd of about 2,000 people responds, “There is a God.”

Several women jump up and down in circles. Nearby a man punches his arms into the air in exaltation.

Jericho, an annual spiritual revival held at Notre Dame D’Haiti Catholic Church, draws about 10,000 people over seven days. Locals flock to the church and some people fly in from Haiti and Canada to participate.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Activists in Miami’s Haitian community called a press conference Tuesday morning to denounce Haiti’s controversial Aug. 9 parliamentary elections, which they called "a sham."

Farah Juste, a Haitian singer and the Fanmi Lavalas political party coordinator for Florida and the Bahamas, said the Haitian government should annul the election results after reports of violence, deaths and tampering in polling places.

Tim Padgett /

Is the Dominican Republic’s controversial plan to deport hundreds of thousands of people of Haitian descent on hold? 

Almost half a million people living in the Dominican Republic have Haitian ancestry. But the Dominican Supreme Court has ruled that anyone born in the D.R. after 1929 will have their citizenship revoked if their parents were not Dominican. That has set the stage this summer for the deportation of hundreds of thousands of Haitian-Dominicans.

Nadege Green / WLRN

The Haitian Cultural Arts Alliance in Little Haiti is one of the 73 Knight Arts Challenge finalists announced yesterday.

The community-wide contest funds ideas that bring South Florida together through the arts.

Eduard Duval Carrier, cultural director at the alliance, says the group plans to host visual artists from across the Caribbean while exploring what it means to live and create in multiethnic communities such as Miami.

"We’ve realized that the Caribbean has produced such a diaspora," he says, "not just Haiti -- but the whole Caribbean."

CSUF Photos / Flickr

Across the street from a record shop on Northeast Second Avenue, Marie Salomon stands outside her Little Haiti variety store chatting with a customer in Creole.

She says people are coming by still upset about Pres. Obama’s immigration plan. She doesn’t really know the full details, but Salomon say she would like to see all undocumented immigrants included.

Nadege Green / WLRN

Before Cardinal Chibly Langlois celebrated Mass at Notre Dame D’Haiti Catholic Church in Little Haiti, he took it all in.

A banner with his likeness hung from a black fence.

Parishioners wore yellow T-shirts with a picture of his face on the front and on the back, a message in Creole thanking God for blessing them with the first-ever Haitian cardinal.

Earlier this year, Pope Francis named Langlois cardinal, making him the first Haitian in history to hold that post.

Nadege Green / WLRN

From Stalin in Russia to Pinochet in Chile, there’s at least one thing we’ve learned about dictators: Despite the terrible things they often do, people’s memories of them can be fond as well as frightening.

Former Haitian dictator Jean-Claude “Baby Doc” Duvalier – who ruled from 1971 to 1986 and died on Saturday in Port-au-Prince at age 63 from a heart attack brought on in part by a tarantula bite – was no exception.

 WLRN spent the weekend listening to the divided opinion on Baby Doc in Miami’s Haitian community.

After being shut down for a little over a decade, the newly renovated Caribbean Marketplace in Little Haiti will bring life back into this tight-knit enclave.

The Marketplace opened in 1990 and closed just nine years later due to structural and financial problems. The Northeast Second Avenue Partnership was involved in the building’s renovation.

Executive director Joann Milord says one of the reasons the Marketplace shut down was the building's lack of air conditioning. That contributed to its physical breakdown --  mold grew and the building started to decay.


For six years, Little Haiti residents have been waiting for Emmanuel “Manno” Sanon Soccer Park, known as Little Haiti Soccer Park, to live up to its promise for neighborhood kids.

Many believed the $36.9 million park, built in 2008 and named after a renowned Haitian soccer player, would host a year-round youth soccer program. A newly formed youth soccer league is looking to fill that void.

The only consistent youth sports program at soccer park is a pee-wee American football team, Little Haiti Optimist.

Little Haiti Rock City

Filmmaker Franco Parente first went to Churchill’s Pub in 1991. He was 17. He snuck in to see Young Turk, a Hialeah band just signed to Geffen Records.

“I remember being scared out of my mind from the car to the front door,” Parente recalls. “I knew to avoid that neighborhood and I couldn’t believe that they were doing a show there. [But] I had the time of my life and came back the following week.”

Now, Parente is documenting the 34-year history of the iconic Miami pub in “Little Haiti Rock City.”