LGBT

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Aboard a flight home from Armenia, Pope Francis fielded a pointed question from reporters: Did he agree with German Cardinal Reinhard Marx, who, in the wake of the Orlando shooting, said gays deserve an apology from the Church?

His answer was frank.

President Obama is designating a new national monument around the Stonewall Inn, the birthplace of the modern gay rights movement.

The Stonewall National Monument in New York City will be the first addition to the National Park System specifically highlighting the history of the LGBT community.

One of the many focuses of this year’s upcoming Human Trafficking Summit may be on Florida’s lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender, or LGBT community.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

At the Stonewall festival in Wilton Manors Saturday, Anthony Memminger was out in white face paint and a long green dress, spinning a rainbow umbrella while a marching band warmed up nearby.

 

Memminger is part of an order of queer nuns that was getting ready to dole out hugs and lollipops during the pride parade. “Sister Luna Glitter Tits, one of the Sisters of Perpetual Indulgence,” Memminger said.

A complicated picture has emerged of 29-year-old Omar Mateen, who opened fire in a gay Orlando nightclub. The attack left 49 dead and dozens more wounded in the worst mass shooting in modern U.S. history.

The moments after Sunday’s fatal nightclub shooting have felt long and heavy for Nuren Haider. The Orlando native says her hijab—a scarf and symbol of her faith—has become a marker.

Scenes of Grief and Healing in South Florida After Orlando Attack

Jun 13, 2016
Spencer Parts

In the hours and days following the Sunday massacre at a gay club in Orlando, members of South Florida's LGBT community have gathered to mourn and to provide comfort to each other.

In the wake of a mass shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando that left at least 49 people dead and more than 50 wounded, queer Latino folks around the country are reflecting on the horror of the attack.

Sunday began with one of the deadliest shootings in American history — at least 49 people were killed and more than 50 were injured. The attack took place at Pulse, a gay nightclub in Orlando, and the suspect was an American Muslim who pledged allegiance to ISIS the night of the attack.

Miami Beach Police Department

As law enforcement agencies try to piece together  what happened Sunday morning at a gay nightclub in Orlando, when at least 50 people were gunned down, many in South Florida wonder about security and how to protect themselves and those they love from similar attacks. 

  "Every time there is a pride event, there is that fear that exists, especially since we have seen the passage of marriage equality," says Cindy Brown, Miami-Dade development officer for Equality Florida, the largest LGBTQ rights advocacy group in the state. 

 

On Sunday morning, a gunman at the gay nightclub Pulse in Orlando, Fla., perpetrated the deadliest mass shooting in modern American history. He killed 49 people and injured more than 50.

The city of Orlando has released the names of the identified victims, after notifying their next of kin.

Orlando Nightclub Shooting: How to Help

Jun 12, 2016
Lynare Robbins / Courtesy

A shooting at a gay nightclub in Orlando has left 50 dead and more injured, reported to be the largest mass shooting in U.S. history. Gov. Rick Scott declared a state of emergency Sunday morning.

There are a number of opportunities in South Florida to support the victims and their families.

Attend a vigil

Miami Beach Bans Conversion Therapy For Minors

Jun 9, 2016
Nick Swyter / the Miami Herald

Miami Beach is the latest city in the country to ban a controversial form of therapy that professes to change someone's sexual orientation or gender identity. The city commission voted unanimously Wednesday night to ban conversion therapy for minors under the age of 18.  And from now on, anyone caught practicing it might be slapped with a fine of two-hundred dollars a day. Miami Beach Commissioner John Elizabeth Alemàn sponsored the ban.

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