LGBT

Flickr/Creative Commons

Tony Lima was one of 30 Broward County residents at Tuesday’s commission meeting. The executive director of SAVE, he spoke against conversion therapy for minors – the controversial practice of trying to change a person’s sexual orientation or gender identity.

“We need to be able to as a county send a strong message that we are inclusive, that we are loving, that we are protective of their authentic selves – above all,” Lima said.

RADskillZ

Just across the street from Omni Park in downtown Miami, there’s a bar and lounge called 1306 Miami. At first glance, it might look like the typical South Florida bar except if you go on the third Sunday of the month. That's when it transforms into a queer party called Counter Corner. 

Holly Pretsky / WLRN

Despite some scheduling issues, the third annual Gay8 festival is still on. 

Organizers threatened to cancel the event altogether and boycott city of Miami events after they realized a January date they wanted for the festival had been given to the Three Kings Parade. 

The U.S. Census Bureau has never asked Americans about sexual orientation and gender identity. Last year, though, requests for that data came from more than 75 members of Congress and multiple federal agencies.

Still, the Census Bureau concluded "there was no federal data need" to collect this information, the bureau's outgoing director, John Thompson, wrote in March.

Lynn Girton, 69, never came out as a lesbian to her parents. She never even heard of the term lesbian growing up in a Christian household in Ohio. She dated men, because that was what she says was supposed to do.

Then at a summer job, she met Pat Freedman.

"We fell in love, and we did not know what that meant," Girton says. "We just wanted to spend the rest of our lives together."

Both women didn't tell anyone. Their parents were in the dark about who they were, and in a sense, Girton and Freedman were too.

Even for a generation raised in a climate of growing acceptance, for LGBTQ students -- expressing sexual orientation or gender identity at school, can still feel unsafe.

Teacher Kimberly Hively alleged Ivy Tech Community College in South Bend, Ind., denied her a full-time job because she is a lesbian. On Tuesday, the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals said such discrimination violates the 1964 Civil Rights Act. The 8-3 ruling is the first by a federal appeals court to recognize the law as protecting workplace rights of LGBT employees.

The U.S. Census Bureau published a list on Tuesday of more than 50 planned topics of questions for the 2020 Census and the American Community Survey.

The Associated Press has tallied up business lost in North Carolina because of the controversial "bathroom bill," and estimates the total cost is at least $3.76 billion over 12 years.

That estimate is probably low, the wire service says.

There are renewed efforts at the state level to pass so-called religious freedom bills. LGBTQ rights advocates believe that's because local lawmakers are anticipating support from the Trump administration.

In Alabama, there's a bill that allows adoption agencies that are religiously affiliated to hold true to their faith if they don't think same-sex couples should be parents. The psychiatric community has found no evidence that having same-sex parents harms children.

Until September, journalist Chadwick Moore says his life had been lived in a liberal bubble — one that burst after he wrote a profile Milo Yiannopoulos for Out Magazine.

Florida lawmakers want to add protections in state law for the lesbian gay bisexual and transgender community. 

An executive order protecting gays and lesbians who work for federal contractors "will remain intact" at President Trump's direction, the White House says. The move could allay concerns that Trump might end recently adopted protections against an anti-LGBTQ workplace.

The White House announced the move in a relatively short statement early Tuesday, saying that the president "is determined to protect the rights of all Americans, including the LGBTQ community."

e
Courtesy of Easton Branam

As President Barack Obama leaves the White House, let’s look back on a major policy change he made: the repeal of "don't ask, don't tell."

Introduced in 1993 by President Bill Clinton, the policy banned gay, lesbian and bisexual soldiers from serving openly in the military.

Obama ended "don't ask, don't tell" in 2011.

But for former Army Capt. Easton Branam, who served in Iraq between 2005 and 2007, the Clinton-era policy was all she knew.

An openly gay Florida lawmaker is advocating for a new strategy to pass legal protections for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer people in the state. Under Florida law, LGBTQ people can legally be denied employment, housing and public accommodations. For years Miami Beach Democratic Representative David Richardson has been trying to pass a comprehensive bill to change that, but he believes lawmakers should take a new approach.

Pages