legislature

Twitter -- Miami-Dade Public Schools

A South Florida lawmaker is on a personal crusade to reduce distracted driving.

State Rep. Emily Slosberg is pushing cities and all 67 counties in Florida to pass a resolution urging lawmakers to make texting while driving a primary offense.

According to state data, there were almost 50,000 crashes involving distracted driving in Florida last year. That’s more than five crashes every hour.

At a recent Boca Raton City Council meeting, Slosberg, D-Boca Raton, said she tried to get a similar law passed during the last legislative session but was unsuccessful.

Holly Pretsky / WLRN

The Miami-Dade County School Board plans to vote on whether to take legal action against the state to fight some provisions of House Bill 7069. That was the conclusion of Wednesday's informal workshop to discuss legal options.

Superintendent Alberto Carvalho acknowledged the bill contains productive elements. "There are some provisions that we're very supportive of," he said, "the proverbial one ounce of honey for a gallon of vinegar." He specifically mentioned the daily recess requirement built into the bill, as well as the expansion of certain teacher bonuses. 

Holly Pretsky / WLRN

Three candidates vying for the Senate District 40 seat  vacated by Frank Artiles participated in a forum at the Miami Dade College Kendall Campus Wednesday night.

The forum was moderated by WLRN morning host Luis Hernandez, and members of the audience had the opportunity to submit questions for the candidates. 

Gun rights supporters as well as gun control advocates are declaring victory over this year’s Florida legislative session. But, they’re marking some disappointments as well.

A Florida lawmaker is hoping the state legislature will take up a refiled gun control bill during this week’s special session.

Special Session Will Include Medical Marijuana

Jun 7, 2017

Florida legislative leaders have struck a deal about carrying out a voter-approved constitutional amendment that broadly legalized medical marijuana for patients with debilitating illnesses.

Teresa Frontado / WLRN News

This week’s special legislative session returns to an argument House lawmakers might have thought they put to bed.  

This week’s special legislative session is expected to cost taxpayers more than $100,000. But the three-day long process could be a boon for Tallahassee’s local economy.

Legislators May Take Up Medical Marijuana During Special Session

Jun 5, 2017

Next week's special legislative session focused on funding for education and economic development won't include medical marijuana, at least for now.

A bill aimed at codifying students’ religious expression is awaiting a signature from Florida Governor Rick Scott.

 

The Florida Student and School Personnel Religious Liberties Act mandates that schools not “discriminate” against students, teachers, or employees “on the basis of a religious viewpoint or religious expression.”

Senate Bill 436 and its House companion 303 would also clarify rules regarding religious expression in school.

This week could mark the beginning of the end for a long-running restriction on liquor sales.  Florida Governor Rick Scott has until Wednesday to take action on a measure allowing stores to sell groceries and liquor under the same roof.

Elections experts say Florida lawmakers dropped the ball when it comes to improving voter security.

After a gunman killed 49 people at a gay nightclub in Orlando, the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender community worked to translate grief into political action. Even though attempts to pass civil rights protections in the statehouse failed again this year, LGBTQ activists are claiming a victory.

Two Florida lawmakers are already looking ahead to next year’s legislative session to revive a bipartisan effort to reform the state’s claims bill process. It allows those who sue a government agency over things like injuries or negligence to receive the rest of the money awarded to them—a process that can often take years.

Lawmakers Back Payment In Death, Injury Cases

May 17, 2017

Saying the Florida Department of Children and Families didn't do its job, state lawmakers last month approved paying $3.75 million in a 2011 child-abuse case that drew national headlines.

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