language

For a few years now, teachers and English purists have bemoaned the slow, painful death of language. It was bad enough when only rock music and television were the enemy.

Today it's smartphones. In fact, in a recent article a professor bemoans to The Telegraph that social media network Twitter is causing students’ writing skills to “go down the plug hole.”

Miami Accents: Why Locals Embrace That Heavy "L" Or Not

Aug 27, 2013
Isabel Echarte

Michelle Antelo was born and raised in Miami but has never lived anywhere else. After learning Spanish at home from her Cuban parents, she always thought her English, which she learned at school, was up to American standards.

But, as many Miamians have learned, her way of speaking stuck out around people from places other than Miami. When Antelo was a cheerleader in high school, her Broward County teammates told her she sounded different.

Nicolas Espinosa

You might’ve heard it when you're out on the town, at Publix, or at that cafe down the street. Or, you might hear it when you open your own mouth.

RELATED: Miami Accents: Why Locals Embrace That Heavy "L" Or Not

Editor's note: Fair warning — this essay is, in part, about Spanish profanities, and it includes several.

The man who taught me to swear in Cuban died last week.

Wikipedia Commons

Language is formed by giving meaning to sounds and stringing together these meaningful expressions to communicate feelings and ideas. Until recently most linguists believed that the relationship between the structure of language and the natural world was mainly the influence of the environment on vocabulary. Now, a new University of Miami study shows that there is a link between geographical elevation and the way language is spoken. 

Picking 2012's Word Of The Year

Dec 28, 2012

There is a major decision coming up that will truly define the year 2012. Yes, it's almost time for the American Dialect Society to once again vote on the Word of the Year. Will it be selfie? Hate-watching? Superstorm? Double down? Fiscal cliff? Or (shudder) YOLO?

http://sinandsyntax.com

12/27/12 - Thursday’s Topical Currents begins with journalist and language expert Constance Hale.  Her latest book concentrates on the “pivot points” of our sentences:  verbs.  In her book, VEX, HEX, SMASH, SMOOCH, she examines both heavenly and headache verbs.  And more.  Linda Gassenheimer and wine columnist Fred Tasker with end of year drinks and food.

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