language

Census: 128 Languages Spoken In South Florida Homes

Nov 3, 2015
U.S. Census Bureau

 

At least 350 languages were spoken in U.S. households between 2009 and 2013, the U.S. Census Bureau reported Tuesday.

It is one of the most comprehensive data ever collected by the Census' American Community Survey. ACS previously had only 39 language groups available to classify its data annually.

 

In the Miami metropolitan area – Miami-Dade, Broward and Palm Beach counties – 128 languages are spoken at home.

 

With terms like mahoosive and al desko, the editors of OxfordDictionaries.com say they've made the largest quarterly update in their history, adding definitions for 1,000 words.

We'll clarify that while the digital service is affiliated with Oxford University, it's officially separate from the venerable dictionary.

The new additions range from pop culture ("xlnt" and "permadeath") to business-speak ("algorithmic trading").

The growing popularity of electronic cigarettes has now sparked the notice of the estimable Oxford Dictionaries, which has chosen "vape" as the word of the year for 2014. The word can be a noun or a verb; it beat out contenders such as "bae" and "normcore."

Noting that e-cigarettes have come a long way since the early 1980s, when the "vape" was first breathed into life, the folks at Oxford Dictionaries say it took awhile for the new market, and the new word, to mature.

More English, More Money? Maybe Not In Miami

Sep 24, 2014
freedigitalphotos.net

The list of things that threaten the U. S. economy is long, indeed. But here's one item that might not have occurred to you.

Speaking bad English.

As the Brookings Institution scopes it out in a report released Wednesday, immigrants seeking work in the U. S. often have to settle for jobs beneath their qualifications just because their English is not up to snuff.

www.ammon-shea.com

06/25/14 - Wednesday's Topical Currents documents the state of the English language with author and dictionary collector, Ammon Shea.  The author of Reading the OED has just written a new book -  Bad English: A History of Linguistic Aggravation. Complaints that Americans are ruining the King’s English have been around for hundreds of years…fro

Our Miami talk is markedly different from the Southern drawls heard farther north in the state, but even within the four South Florida counties, twangs and tones are varied.

The New York Times this week released a dialect map to show its readers how their speech lines up with their hometowns. A quiz asks readers how they pronounce words like "caramel" and "aunt," and the answers generate a color coded map, which also highlights three of the cities whose residents speak most like the quiz taker.

Picture the "head honcho" of an organization and what comes to mind are boardrooms, power and wealth, an individual at the top of his or her game.

But where did the word "honcho" originate? While the word is often mistakenly believed to have Spanish origins, it actually traces its roots to American soldiers who fought in the Pacific during World War II.

For a few years now, teachers and English purists have bemoaned the slow, painful death of language. It was bad enough when only rock music and television were the enemy.

Today it's smartphones. In fact, in a recent article a professor bemoans to The Telegraph that social media network Twitter is causing students’ writing skills to “go down the plug hole.”

Miami Accents: Why Locals Embrace That Heavy "L" Or Not

Aug 27, 2013
Isabel Echarte

Michelle Antelo was born and raised in Miami but has never lived anywhere else. After learning Spanish at home from her Cuban parents, she always thought her English, which she learned at school, was up to American standards.

But, as many Miamians have learned, her way of speaking stuck out around people from places other than Miami. When Antelo was a cheerleader in high school, her Broward County teammates told her she sounded different.

Nicolas Espinosa

You might’ve heard it when you're out on the town, at Publix, or at that cafe down the street. Or, you might hear it when you open your own mouth.

RELATED: Miami Accents: Why Locals Embrace That Heavy "L" Or Not

Editor's note: Fair warning — this essay is, in part, about Spanish profanities, and it includes several.

The man who taught me to swear in Cuban died last week.

Wikipedia Commons

Language is formed by giving meaning to sounds and stringing together these meaningful expressions to communicate feelings and ideas. Until recently most linguists believed that the relationship between the structure of language and the natural world was mainly the influence of the environment on vocabulary. Now, a new University of Miami study shows that there is a link between geographical elevation and the way language is spoken. 

Picking 2012's Word Of The Year

Dec 28, 2012

There is a major decision coming up that will truly define the year 2012. Yes, it's almost time for the American Dialect Society to once again vote on the Word of the Year. Will it be selfie? Hate-watching? Superstorm? Double down? Fiscal cliff? Or (shudder) YOLO?

http://sinandsyntax.com

12/27/12 - Thursday’s Topical Currents begins with journalist and language expert Constance Hale.  Her latest book concentrates on the “pivot points” of our sentences:  verbs.  In her book, VEX, HEX, SMASH, SMOOCH, she examines both heavenly and headache verbs.  And more.  Linda Gassenheimer and wine columnist Fred Tasker with end of year drinks and food.