journalism

Once again, NPR finds itself in the uncomfortable position of reporting on unverified information, just as it did last year when WikiLeaks dumped troves of what it said were hacked emails taken from Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton's campaign chairman, John Podesta, and from top officials of the Democratic National Committee.

Facebook is unveiling a new journalism project Wednesday. No, the Silicon Valley giant isn't hiring a team of reporters. Facebook says it wants engineers — the tech talent at local and global publishers — to tag-team earlier on to develop technologies that make Facebook a more powerful platform to distribute news and discuss it.

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Wiki Commons

Fake news is nothing new. Its impact has waxed and waned through American history. But there was a golden age of "yellow journalism," back in the 1890s, when fake news helped start a war.

Yellow journalism has been defined as any journalism that treats news in an unprofessional or unethical manner.

The term was coined in the 1890s to describe the ferocious circulation war between William Randolph Hearst's New York Journal and the New York World, owned by Joseph Pulitzer.

A lot of fake and misleading news stories were shared across social media during the election. One that got a lot of traffic had this headline: "FBI Agent Suspected In Hillary Email Leaks Found Dead In Apparent Murder-Suicide." The story is completely false, but it was shared on Facebook over half a million times.

Gwen Ifill, one of the most prominent political journalists in the country, has died, according to PBS. She was 61.

A federal jury has found that Rolling Stone, a reporter and the magazine's publisher are liable in a defamation lawsuit over a retracted article about an alleged rape at the University of Virginia.

The trial centered on a November 2014 piece by reporter Sabrina Rubin Erdely that told the story of a student, identified as "Jackie," who said she was brutally gang raped at a fraternity party in 2012.

Journalism in Mosul right now is punishable by death

Oct 25, 2016
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Reuters/via Amaq news agency 

Citizen journalists inside Mosul say the government there, imposed by ISIS, is starting to break down. An offensive to drive the terror group out of the Iraqi city has been ongoing for 10 days.

But — who are these citizen journalists?

On Sunday, we lost one of our own.

Ben Kushner

For a while in the late 1980s, Jeff Schmalz was the Miami bureau chief for the New York Times. That was before he was completely out of the closet, and Miami was one of the places in the country where he felt comfortable as a gay man.

University of Miami / Courtesy

Ilene Prusher, noted international reporter and editor, spoke to University of Miami journalism students Wednesday night.

She informed them about the dangers journalists have to face when shedding light on the dark corners of the world.

For two decades, Prusher reported on the wars in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan. And she covered the Arab-Israeli conflicts.

Tech Group 'Chicas Poderosas' Comes To FIU's Journalism School

Mar 4, 2014
Diego Saldana-Rojas / WLRN

One Portuguese woman is set on the mission to educate women journalists on technology and leadership.

Fittingly, Mariana Santos spoke at FIU's Lillian Lodge Kopenhaver Center for the Advancement of Women in Communications this Tuesday, telling students and staff about her experiences working at the Guardian, in Latin America and in the current state of journalism.

WLRN Announces Senior Leadership Team For News

Nov 15, 2013

WLRN Public Radio and Television has named Tom Hudson as vice-president of news, Terence Shepherd as news director and Alicia Zuckerman as editorial director for all of WLRN-Miami Herald News.

“We have brought together one of the best, if not the best, leadership teams in public media news,” said John Labonia, general manager of WLRN Public Radio and Television. “Our goal of making WLRN the round-the-clock, pervasive and constant source of news and information about and of interest to South Florida is now in reach. I am honored to be working with such talented individuals.”

The news spread with the speed of the Internet: The Washington Post, a newspaper that helped bring down a president, would be sold to Jeff Bezos, the tech titan who started Amazon.

The Washington Post Co. will sell its flagship newspaper and one of the most respected news organizations in the country to Amazon.com founder Jeffrey P. Bezos, the company announced in a press release. The Post has been a family-owned business for four generations.

Amazon, the company said, will play no role in the purchase. Bezos is making the purchase personally.

Vividly

Thanks to YouTube, anyone can be a filmmaker. Thanks to Quirky, anyone can be an inventor. And now thanks to Miami natives Sabrina and Silvia Scandar and their soon-to-be-launched website, Vividly, anyone can be a fashion designer.

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