Joe's Stone Crabs

http://www.joesmemories.com/

11/07/13 - Syndicated food columnist Linda Gassenheimer, Special wine correspondent Fred Tasker and WLRN hosts Joseph Cooper and Bonnie Berman interview Deeny Kaplan Lorber author of Waiting at Joe’s.

Wally Gobetz / Flickr

From gangsters to glamor girls, presidents to princesses and actors to athletes, Joe’s Stone Crab restaurant has run the gamut of diners over its 100 years in operation.

On October 15, the legendary South Beach restaurant opened the doors for dinner service – the first of the stone crab season.

In 1913, Joe’s began as Joe’s Seafood Restaurant, serving fish sandwiches and fries, after Joe and Jennie Weiss relocated from New York to Miami Beach because of Joe’s asthma.

Joe was a waiter and Jennie was the cook.

Why Stone Crabbers Are Praying For A Better Season

Oct 14, 2013
Marya Repko

All summer, stone crab crews have been mending their traps and preparing their boats -- waiting for the start of the stone crab season.

With the opening of the season starting Oct. 15, the economic future of the industry will hinge on how bountiful the catch is for Monroe, Lee and Collier counties.

It’s these three areas that provide the bulk of the two to three million pounds of stone crab landings in Florida each year.

But last year, the going was rough for a lot of the crabbers.

I can imagine my dad's excitement leaving gritty Newark behind him and hitting the highway in his old Studebaker bound for paradise . . . Miami Beach. I can see the bathing suit postcards guiding his way and hear the ocean calling his name: M-I-L-T-O-N B-R-A-N-D, come on down!

Jewish Museum Of Florida Shares Stories Of Struggles

May 15, 2013

 

In 1887 Marcus Weinkle’s loving parents buried him alive. That act likely saved the 13-year-old’s life and certainly set in motion an odyssey that took him from his native Russia to, eventually, Central Florida.

  His story – and that of countless other Jewish immigrants with a Florida connection – comes alive in the Jewish Museum of Florida-FIU on Miami Beach.

Andres Aravena

In her March 22 article in the New York Times, Liesl Schillinger wrote that she wanted to capture the Miami restaurants and tourist haunts that are  "uncool" and serve "the salty fried food, the lime-drenched cocktails."