jobs

Tax Credits/ Flickr

Tuesday morning was one of the few times fast-food workers publicly protested lower wages in Miami, joining the dozens of cities that hosted protesters back in December. The protest coincided with the release of a new study from FIU's Research Institute of Social and Economic Policy which, among other things, looks at the intersection of low-paying jobs and wage theft.

Wilson Sayre went to the protest:

Entrepeneur Brings Tech Education To Minority Students

Jan 20, 2014
Hillary Lindwall/WLRN

  

Felecia Hatcher is on a mission. She wants to bridge the tech education gap in Florida's schools and give underserved students the chance to become web-based entrepreneurs. She started the program Code Fever last year to reach that goal.

"Technology will allow [the students] to build their businesses and catapult their ideas much faster and definitely much cheaper," Hatcher says.

Creative Commons via Flickr

The discount grocery store Aldi is opening up four new locations in South Florida: Palm Springs, Deerfield Beach, Hialeah and Miami Gardens. In order to staff those locations, the discount grocer is holding hiring fairs throughout the area on Jan. 15 and 16.

Though it looks like a typical grocery store on the outside, a few things inside might throw you off your shopping routine. The first thing you’ll probably do is try to grab a cart. At Aldi, you have to rent it. The $.25 asking price isn’t much, but it's one of the many differences between this and any other grocery store.

pbarcas/flickr

Florida’s minimum wage rose by 14 cents on Jan. 1, to $7.93 per hour. But two South Florida lawmakers say that doesn't go far enough.

They’ve filed bills to raise the minimum wage to $10.10 per hour. The wage increase would also apply to workers who earn tips, like restaurant servers currently making $4.91 per hour.

Sen. Dwight Bullard, D-Cutler Bay, and Rep. Cynthia Stafford, D-Opa-Locka, say they’re trying to get more people out of poverty.

floridajobs.org

The trouble with Florida’s revamped unemployment website is getting more attention in Washington. U.S. Senator Bill Nelson is again calling for a federal investigation.

More than 200,000 jobless Floridians use the website to file for weekly benefits worth up to $275.

The new website debuted in mid-October after the state spent four years and $63 million upgrading equipment.

Your Employer May Well Know You’re Reading This

Jan 6, 2014
Julia Duba / WLRN

Ask your boss if she likes this story. With the right software she could be monitoring every key stroke and screen shot of your company-issued smart phone or computer. Every single day. Every word you say.

MoneyBlogNewz / Flickr CC

  Recent protests across the country were aimed at doubling the federal minimum wage. In Florida the minimum wage will go up on Jan. 1, but not nearly by that much. Each year, the state’s minimum wage is automatically increased based on inflation. WLRN-Miami Herald reporter Kenny Malone has more details:

Mayor Gimenez's Veto Prevails In County-Worker Pay Dispute

Dec 17, 2013
epSos.de / Flickr CC

The healthcare deduction for Miami-Dade County employees stays put. Commissioners failed by one vote to overturn Mayor Carlos Gimenez's veto on union workers' pay.

That means most county employees will continue to contribute 5 percent of their base pay toward group healthcare instead of getting that money restored as of Jan. 1, as commissioners had supported two weeks ago.

Chairwoman Rebeca Sosa switched her vote, saying she could not endorse eliminating the healthcare contribution if it could lead to employee layoffs.

Florida Governor's Office

Florida’s economy is improving, and soon voters will have to decide whether Gov. Rick Scott deserves enough of the credit to be reelected next year.

Scott made jobs his top priority. He said his administration would make efforts leading to 700,000 new jobs over seven years – a number above the economic growth forecast by state economists.

steve_sris/flickr

Tallahassee boasts one of the highest concentrations of lawyers in the country, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Many of those lawyers are in jobs that have nothing to do with being in a courtroom.

The Bureau of Labor Statistics says more students are graduating from law school each year than there are jobs available.

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