jobs

Americans have been waiting for a solid pay raise for years. Maybe there's good news awaiting them as the country employs more people.

The U.S. economic recovery has gone on for eight long years, and the unemployment rate is at a low 4.4 percent. But wage gains have barely budged.

That's got economists scratching their heads.

Peter Haden / WLRN

Florida Gov. Rick Scott dropped by a Boca Raton company Thursday to highlight a major job announcement.

Modernizing Medicine, a health information technology firm, said it will create more than 800 new jobs in Palm Beach County by 2022.

The company makes tablet computer software that helps doctors work more efficiently. It started in a Boynton Beach office with two employees in 2010 — the same year Scott was elected to the first of his two four-year terms.

Why can't kids today just work their way through college the way earlier generations did?

The answer to that question isn't psychology. It's math. A summer job just doesn't have the purchasing power it used to, especially when you compare it with the cost of college.

Let's take the example of a working-class student at a four-year public university who's getting no help from Mom and Dad. In 1981-'82, the average full cost to attend was $2,870. That's for tuition, fees and room and board.

Peter Haden / WLRN

A group of top economists and innovators met in Palm Beach Monday to sound an alarm: radical change is coming to the American workforce.

USGS, via Wikimedia Commons

A proposal to build a water storage reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee could create more than 39,000 jobs, according to a study released Tuesday by the Everglades Foundation.

Amanda Rabines / WLRN News

Over the past year, Florida has been second only to California in the number of new jobs created with just over a quarter of a million new jobs. But California’s labor market is twice the size of Florida’s. The rate of growth of Florida's job market also ranked second in the nation at 3.1 percent. (Oregon was No. 1.)

 

President-elect Donald Trump and Carrier have reached an agreement to keep 1,000 jobs in the U.S., the air-conditioner company announced Tuesday evening.

Trump also tweeted:

Tom Hudson

Through all the tawdry talk, accusations and innuendo during this election American voters have been consistent in saying the economy is their big issue.

 

The Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, which includes South Florida in its territory, quizzed 200 companies throughout the region. One out of three of them said the election was having an effect on their business decisions such as investing in their companies or hiring new workers.

 

Nadege Green / WLRN

 

  A group of housekeepers and nannies gathered  in Liberty City at the Miami Workers Center to talk about their pay in advance of a Domestic Workers Assembly the center will host next month. The assembly will address the field’s low wages and protections for the largely female workforce.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

Nadiam Nesbitt sat two young men across from one another, called them Interviewer and Interviewee, and posed a question: “You’re the manager at Starbucks. What kind of questions would you ask him?”

 

The Interviewer blushed, averted his eyes, pleaded, “I don’t know anything about Starbucks.”

“What skills would you look for?” Nesbitt prodded.

 

“If he knew how to make coffee?” the Interviewer asked tentatively.

 

The Labor Department's May jobs report, released Friday, was surprisingly bad.

Economists scrambled to explain why they hadn't seen a hiring dropoff coming. Most had predicted about 160,000 new jobs for May, but in fact, only 38,000 materialized. That was the smallest increase since September, 2010.

Tom Hudson

Over 20,000 students received their undergraduate, graduate and professional degrees this spring from South Florida colleges and universities. Not all of these new degrees will wind up being put to work in South Florida’s job market. Some will go back to school. Some will leave and some will stay. Why?

"There are very talented individuals," says FIU Business Professor Jerry Haar, "who will remain in a location or leave based upon what the opportunities are in their vocational arena as well as their quality of life."

Do They Stay or Do They Go?

Nadege Green / WLRN

Marco Ramirez graduates in about a month with a master’s degree in social work from Florida International University.

Ramirez, 25, is a transgender man and he says when looking for employment there are always unnecessary hurdles. 

Gender nonconforming and trans job seekers struggle to find inclusive workplaces.

And Ramirez adds,  when he does snag a job, there are always inappropriate questions about his gender identity. 

San Jorge Children's Hospital is Puerto Rico's largest pediatric hospital, drawing patients from throughout the Caribbean. It's a bustling facility in San Juan, with specialties in surgery, rheumatology and oncology. It also has brightly colored live parrots at every entrance.

"It just sends a message to the patient that they're in a friendly place," explains San Jorge's vice president of operations, Domingo Cruz Vivaldi. "That they're here to be treated, but they're also going to have a good time."

Creative Commons via Flickr / Kathryn Decker (https://flic.kr/p/9yMfuF)

Update 10/6/2015 5:15 p.m. - This measure passed in an 8-4 vote.

People who have been to jail may soon find it easier to get a job with Miami-Dade County.

The controversial law that would take questions about criminal history off county job applications is up for final debate at Tuesday’s commission meeting.

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