jobs

A coming wave of job automation could force between 400 million and 800 million people worldwide out of a job in the next 13 years, according to a new study.

A report released this week from the research arm of the consulting firm McKinsey & Company forecasts scenarios in which 3 percent to 14 percent of workers around the world — in 75 million to 375 million jobs — will have to acquire new skills and switch occupations by 2030.

ribbon-cutting
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

A pair of very large scissors and an orange carpet were rolled out in the Fort Lauderdale sun Friday afternoon.

The orange-themed German rental car company, Sixt-Rent-A-Car, opened its North American headquarters in the city. 

Sixt, which is known for renting luxury vehicles at “an economy cost,” will add 300 new jobs to the area over the next five years.  Florida’s recently released October jobs report showed unemployment across the state is down to a decade-low  3.6 percent. In Broward County, that number is even lower, at 3.3 percent. 

Job Fair Brings Thousands Of Hopeful Applicants To Sunrise

Nov 16, 2017
sports arena
Caitie Switalski / WLRN

Nearly 3,000 people walked through the BB&T Center in Sunrise on Thursday looking for new jobs. 

 

Job News USA , a recruiting and marketing agency, hosted a local job fair that brought 60 employers together under one roof.  General Manager Tiffany Price said hiring companies ranged from the Florida Panthers to the city of Sunrise.

Tom Hudson

Construction cranes may dot the South Florida skyline. Construction zones may occupy our streets. Cement trucks and tractor trailers carrying bulldozers may mingle in our traffic. But there are fewer people working in construction in South Florida than there were a decade ago when the real estate boom came crashing down.

This building boom doesn’t have unbridled activity like the last one, and it doesn’t have the workforce either. Sixteen percent fewer people are working in construction today compared to the beginning of 2006, even though pay has jumped 15 percent.

Americans have been waiting for a solid pay raise for years. Maybe there's good news awaiting them as the country employs more people.

The U.S. economic recovery has gone on for eight long years, and the unemployment rate is at a low 4.4 percent. But wage gains have barely budged.

That's got economists scratching their heads.

Peter Haden / WLRN

Florida Gov. Rick Scott dropped by a Boca Raton company Thursday to highlight a major job announcement.

Modernizing Medicine, a health information technology firm, said it will create more than 800 new jobs in Palm Beach County by 2022.

The company makes tablet computer software that helps doctors work more efficiently. It started in a Boynton Beach office with two employees in 2010 — the same year Scott was elected to the first of his two four-year terms.

Why can't kids today just work their way through college the way earlier generations did?

The answer to that question isn't psychology. It's math. A summer job just doesn't have the purchasing power it used to, especially when you compare it with the cost of college.

Let's take the example of a working-class student at a four-year public university who's getting no help from Mom and Dad. In 1981-'82, the average full cost to attend was $2,870. That's for tuition, fees and room and board.

Peter Haden / WLRN

A group of top economists and innovators met in Palm Beach Monday to sound an alarm: radical change is coming to the American workforce.

USGS, via Wikimedia Commons

A proposal to build a water storage reservoir south of Lake Okeechobee could create more than 39,000 jobs, according to a study released Tuesday by the Everglades Foundation.

Amanda Rabines / WLRN News

Over the past year, Florida has been second only to California in the number of new jobs created with just over a quarter of a million new jobs. But California’s labor market is twice the size of Florida’s. The rate of growth of Florida's job market also ranked second in the nation at 3.1 percent. (Oregon was No. 1.)

 

President-elect Donald Trump and Carrier have reached an agreement to keep 1,000 jobs in the U.S., the air-conditioner company announced Tuesday evening.

Trump also tweeted:

Tom Hudson

Through all the tawdry talk, accusations and innuendo during this election American voters have been consistent in saying the economy is their big issue.

 

The Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta, which includes South Florida in its territory, quizzed 200 companies throughout the region. One out of three of them said the election was having an effect on their business decisions such as investing in their companies or hiring new workers.

 

Nadege Green / WLRN

 

  A group of housekeepers and nannies gathered  in Liberty City at the Miami Workers Center to talk about their pay in advance of a Domestic Workers Assembly the center will host next month. The assembly will address the field’s low wages and protections for the largely female workforce.

Rowan Moore Gerety / WLRN

Nadiam Nesbitt sat two young men across from one another, called them Interviewer and Interviewee, and posed a question: “You’re the manager at Starbucks. What kind of questions would you ask him?”

 

The Interviewer blushed, averted his eyes, pleaded, “I don’t know anything about Starbucks.”

“What skills would you look for?” Nesbitt prodded.

 

“If he knew how to make coffee?” the Interviewer asked tentatively.

 

The Labor Department's May jobs report, released Friday, was surprisingly bad.

Economists scrambled to explain why they hadn't seen a hiring dropoff coming. Most had predicted about 160,000 new jobs for May, but in fact, only 38,000 materialized. That was the smallest increase since September, 2010.

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