innovation

Peter Haden / WLRN

A group of top economists and innovators met in Palm Beach Monday to sound an alarm: radical change is coming to the American workforce.

Every recent president has promised to innovate the way government works, and this week, the Trump administration announced its plan to do the same.

The initiative is called the White House Office of American Innovation. Jared Kushner, the president's son-in-law and senior adviser, will lead a team that includes business executives with little or no government experience. The Trump team says its agenda includes "modernizing government services" and "creating transformational infrastructure projects."

Rowan Moore Gerety

When Yomaira Hidalgo set out for an associate’s degree taking classes at ITT Tech three nights a week, it didn’t take long to unravel the precarious routine she shared with her husband, her mother and three young children. In a word, she says, it  was “miserable.”

In a new book, The Complacent Class, economist Tyler Cowen argues that the United States is standing still.

People have grown more risk averse and are reluctant to switch jobs or move to another state, he says, and the desire to innovate — to grow and change — has gone away.

In an interview with NPR's Rachel Martin, Cowen says he's worried that more and more communities are self-segregating — by income, education or race.

Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science

Science innovators got a challenge today as the Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science announced a new innovation fellowship it will offer starting in 2016. Two will be offered the first year: one for an invention to restore coral reefs and the other to help reduce people’s exposure to carcinogens.

The winner will get $100,000 to support the 12- to 18-month fellowship.

The money is part of a $1 million gift from Ted Caplow, CEO of Caplow Applied Science or CappSci, who has served various roles at the science museum in the past three years.

In an alley in Northeast Washington, D.C., hundreds of pounds of produce are piled haphazardly on pallets. Mexican Fruits, a discount grocer, can't sell the fruit and vegetables inside these boxes because the food has gone soft or is lightly bruised. Some will be donated, but most boxes are destined for a large, green Dumpster nearby.