Income mobility

Economics
10:42 am
Tue March 3, 2015

Income Is Only One Of The Ways South Florida Is Segregated

South Florida is of the most economically segregated metro-areas in the US. Housing developments like Liberty Square, contribute to some of the separation of the rich and the poor, but it's isolated rich enclaves that make that segregation the most pronounced.
Credit Creative Commons

A new study from the University of Toronto's Martin Prosperity Institute ranks South Florida in the top 10 percent most segregated metro areas in the United States.

“Segregated Cities” ranks the degree to which 359 metro areas nationwide are segregated by income, education achievement, type of occupation and overall segregation. South Florida is 39th in the study's overall evaluation.

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Living in South Florida
2:33 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Tell WLRN: How Much Is Enough To Live In South Florida?

How many piggy banks do you need?
Credit Creative Commons via Flickr user Low Jianwei

Following national discussion about minimum wages, livable wages, and government assistance, WLRN-Miami Herald News wants to explore just what it takes to live in South Florida.

No one is exempt from paying for things: food, clothing, rent, bills -- the list goes on. Some of us can easily afford life's expenses, while others struggle to make ends meet.

We want to explore your views on these topics through a series called "How Much Is Enough?"

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Income Mobility
11:56 am
Thu August 22, 2013

If You're Poor In Florida, You're Better Off Working In Miami

Above is a map from the study by a team of top economists. Lighter colors represent areas where low-income children are more likely to rise up to a higher income level.
Credit Raj Chetty, Nathaniel Hendren, Patrick Kline, Emmanuel Saez / http://www.equality-of-opportunity.org/

Children from low income families in Florida have the best chance of achieving a higher income level if they grow up in Miami.

Surprised?

I was.  Based on my layman's understanding, I thought we would have low rates of income mobility.

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