immigration

Immigration
12:00 am
Sun August 21, 2011

New Policy Gives Hope To Some Facing Deportation

Melissa, 18, fled gang violence in her native Honduras when she was 7-years-old. Because she has attended U.S. schools and has no criminal record, her deportation has been deferred for one year.
Courtesy of Melissa

The Obama administration on Thursday said it would review the deportation cases of 300,000 illegal immigrants. The administration wants to put high priority on removing convicted criminals, and low priority on cases that involve people who pose no security threat.

That might make a big difference for thousands of undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as children.

New Hope For One Student

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Under the Sun
4:11 pm
Thu April 7, 2011

Confessions Of A Refugee Boy

Simon & Schuster

Learning to Die in Miami is author Carlos Eire’s follow-up to his 2003 memoir, Waiting for Snow in Havana. In his first book, Eire wrote about his childhood in Cuba before and during the Castro revolution.

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Haiti Earthquake
12:59 pm
Mon January 10, 2011

TPS: The Long And Winding Road

A sign directs applicants to the fingerprinting area at the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services building.
Alicia Zuckerman

A few days after the earthquake, the U.S. government decided that Haitians living in the United States would be eligible for Temporary Protected Status, or TPS.  However, there has been much confusion about who can apply, how you apply and what happens after you apply for TPS.

For example, only Haitians who were living in the United States before the earthquake are eligible for TPS.  As Alicia Zuckerman discovered, some Haitians refer to TPS as “Ti Pelen Sosyal”– Kreyol for “L’il Social Trap”– because they fear that they may be deported if they apply.

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Haiti Earthquake
2:44 pm
Sat July 17, 2010

A Special Hour On Haiti

WLRN

In this episode, we look at how the Jan. 12 earthquake in Haiti changed life here in South Florida. We tell stories from a school that absorbed quake survivors, from a church that opened its doors to the grief-stricken, from lawyers’ offices where Haitians applied for an immigration shield, and from a hospital tent where tired doctors were uplifted by a song.

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