immigration

Gaston De Cardenas / El Nuevo Herald staff

Fed up with underwriting the nation’s broken federal immigration system, Miami-Dade County plans to stop paying the cost of temporarily housing undocumented immigrants in its jails.

The dramatic shift in policy comes at a time when the cash-strapped county is coping with a tight budget, but some county commissioners say they are also calling attention to what they say is a serious human-rights issue.

“Not only is it about saving money,” said County Commissioner Sally Heyman, a Democrat in a nonpartisan post. “It’s about saving people.”

Cuban Shrine In Miami Celebrates 40th Anniversary

Dec 3, 2013
Jessica Meszaros

This past weekend The Shrine of Our Lady of Charity, or La Ermita de la Caridad, celebrated its 40th anniversary since it opened in Miami with funds from Cuban exiles.

La Ermita de La Caridad is a replica of the shrine in El Cobre, a village near Santiago de Cuba. The Miami shrine overlooks the sea that connects Cubans to their homeland.

Julio Estorino is a retired Cuban journalist who took part in building La Ermita in Miami 40 years ago.

European Parliament / Creative Commons/Flickr

    

On our rundown: violent protests by thousands against Haitian President Michel Martelly, the Dominican Republic’s decision to strip the citizenship of Dominicans of Haitian descent, and allegations that the Fort Lauderdale and Miami Gardens police are engaging in racial profiling. Plus: we look at how the Miami Book Fair has grown since it began 30 years ago.

Miami Herald

What do you when you live in the most violent place on earth and you can’t take another day of it?

We’re not talking about Syria or Iraq or Afghanistan. This is about Honduras, in Central America, little more than a two-hour flight from Miami. It has the highest murder rate of any nation in the world today, more than 80 per 100,000 people. Its second largest city, San Pedro Sula, has the worst homicide rate of any urban area in the world, almost 175 per 100,000.

In Washington last week, the U.S. House of Representatives made it clear that immigration reform is dead in 2013. But in Miami this week, immigrant advocates made it clear that they intend to press on, with or without reform.

At the National Immigrant Integration Conference -- which concludes Tuesday at the downtown Hilton with a mass swearing in of new U.S. citizens -- hundreds of government, business and NGO leaders discussed ways to better usher immigrants into America’s mainstream.

A story in the Financial Times caught our eye this week. It was on foreign workers in South Korea.

The story looked at the town of Ansan, where about 7.6 percent of the population is foreign. They come from other Asian countries, as well as from Russia. Here's one of the reasons for the change in South Korea, a highly homogeneous society:

Florida College Presidents To Congress: Pass Immigration Reform

Sep 17, 2013
Florida Immigrant Coalition

Florida college and university presidents are calling on Congress to pass immigration reform this year, saying it would be better for the state's economy if foreign students could stay after graduation, instead of being forced to take their diplomas and leave.

The "brain drain" of U.S.-educated foreign students is worrying economic and education leaders who say the students soon become competitors.

www.independent.org/globalcrossings/

09/04/13 - Wednesday’s Topical Currents is with policy expert and Senior Fellow Alvaro Llosa, author of GLOBAL CROSSINGS:  Immigration, Civilization, and America.  He’s been an op-ed page editor and Miami Herald columnist as well as a contributor to the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times.  He ponders how America has gone from a “nation of immigrants,” to become skeptical, even critical of receiving others on our shores and borders.  That’s Topical Currents Wednesday at 1pm.

richard-blanco.com

Cuban cuisine has chewed its way into South Florida's culture. Many an abuela has shared family recipes for ropa vieja and bistec empanizado, through generations. WLRN wants a seat at your table to hear stories, memories or recipes from your kitchen.

  

Teenagers and young adults who arrived in the U.S. illegally before they turned 16 have a chance at temporary legal status. A government program — the Deferred Action for Early Childhood arrivals program — gives them a Social Security number and protection from deportation.

But most who are eligible haven't applied. And advocates such as Melanie Reyes are trying to change that.

Talk about immigration reform on Capitol Hill this summer has raised the hopes of many unauthorized immigrants around the country.

It's also raised the fears of consumer advocates worried about scam artists who promise immigrants they can help them secure legal status.

Eduardo Flores, an unauthorized immigrant from Honduras, wasn't promised immigration documents, but he did place his trust and $4,000 with a man who said he was an immigration attorney.

América Tevé recently televised videos and photographs purportedly showing abuse of Cuban detainees being brutally beaten by Bahamian officials. The video shows four detainees on the floor, an immigration official kicking them.

Elaine de Valle / Political Cortadito

Francis Suarez’s Mayoral Race: There’s An App For That

Miami Commissioner Francis Suarez has a new iPhone app for his supporters to get direct news about his run for mayor.

Suarez said he created it because it fits in with his “high-tech campaign,” according to the blogger Elaine de Valle on Political Cortatido.

The app is called “Suarez 4 Mayor,” and if you tweet a screenshot and mention the commissioner’s account, you get a free t-shirt!

What The Lack Of Asian-Americans Says About Miami

Jul 11, 2013

“Miami is the face of America's future” is a refrain I’ve heard often.  It seems a point of pride that Miami is leading the rest of the country in our racial diversity.

But this statement is only true if you disregard people like me, Asian-Americans.

The U.S. population is about six percent Asian-American. Chicago has a slightly higher share, and Boston and New York have about 10 percent and 14 percent, respectively.   

 Miami-Dade County has less than two percent. That’s lower than the percentage of Asian-Americans for the entire state of Florida. 

http://teddeutch.house.gov/

We're celebrating Independence Day this week by talking to some in South Florida's Congressional delegation.

Today it's Boca Raton-based Democrat Ted Deutch.

In the complete interview, I asked what the U.S. House of Representatives is doing about climate change and sea-level rise, what the Supreme Court’s decision to strike down the Defense of Marriage of Act means for gay couples in Florida, and about his frustrations with the GOP over immigration reform.

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