immigration

www.independent.org/globalcrossings/

09/04/13 - Wednesday’s Topical Currents is with policy expert and Senior Fellow Alvaro Llosa, author of GLOBAL CROSSINGS:  Immigration, Civilization, and America.  He’s been an op-ed page editor and Miami Herald columnist as well as a contributor to the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times and the Los Angeles Times.  He ponders how America has gone from a “nation of immigrants,” to become skeptical, even critical of receiving others on our shores and borders.  That’s Topical Currents Wednesday at 1pm.

richard-blanco.com

Cuban cuisine has chewed its way into South Florida's culture. Many an abuela has shared family recipes for ropa vieja and bistec empanizado, through generations. WLRN wants a seat at your table to hear stories, memories or recipes from your kitchen.

  

Teenagers and young adults who arrived in the U.S. illegally before they turned 16 have a chance at temporary legal status. A government program — the Deferred Action for Early Childhood arrivals program — gives them a Social Security number and protection from deportation.

But most who are eligible haven't applied. And advocates such as Melanie Reyes are trying to change that.

Talk about immigration reform on Capitol Hill this summer has raised the hopes of many unauthorized immigrants around the country.

It's also raised the fears of consumer advocates worried about scam artists who promise immigrants they can help them secure legal status.

Eduardo Flores, an unauthorized immigrant from Honduras, wasn't promised immigration documents, but he did place his trust and $4,000 with a man who said he was an immigration attorney.

América Tevé recently televised videos and photographs purportedly showing abuse of Cuban detainees being brutally beaten by Bahamian officials. The video shows four detainees on the floor, an immigration official kicking them.

Elaine de Valle / Political Cortadito

Francis Suarez’s Mayoral Race: There’s An App For That

Miami Commissioner Francis Suarez has a new iPhone app for his supporters to get direct news about his run for mayor.

Suarez said he created it because it fits in with his “high-tech campaign,” according to the blogger Elaine de Valle on Political Cortatido.

The app is called “Suarez 4 Mayor,” and if you tweet a screenshot and mention the commissioner’s account, you get a free t-shirt!

What The Lack Of Asian-Americans Says About Miami

Jul 11, 2013

“Miami is the face of America's future” is a refrain I’ve heard often.  It seems a point of pride that Miami is leading the rest of the country in our racial diversity.

But this statement is only true if you disregard people like me, Asian-Americans.

The U.S. population is about six percent Asian-American. Chicago has a slightly higher share, and Boston and New York have about 10 percent and 14 percent, respectively.   

 Miami-Dade County has less than two percent. That’s lower than the percentage of Asian-Americans for the entire state of Florida. 

http://teddeutch.house.gov/

We're celebrating Independence Day this week by talking to some in South Florida's Congressional delegation.

Today it's Boca Raton-based Democrat Ted Deutch.

In the complete interview, I asked what the U.S. House of Representatives is doing about climate change and sea-level rise, what the Supreme Court’s decision to strike down the Defense of Marriage of Act means for gay couples in Florida, and about his frustrations with the GOP over immigration reform.

http://ros-lehtinen.house.gov/

 

South Florida's longest serving Congressperson says she's changed with the times.

Ileana Ros-Lehtinen, Republican from Miami, has served in the house for 24 years and voted for the Defense of Marriage Act when it passed in 1996.

"I have evolved, just as the country has evolved."

She explains why she went from supporting DOMA to applauding its undoing by the U.S. Supreme Court last week.

Two Fort Lauderdale men are the first wedded same-sex couple recognized by the United States for a green card, winning their immigration battle two days after the Supreme Court ordered the federal government to honor gay marriages.

“We’re in the history books,” said Julian Marsh, a well-known gay music producer and DJ, who sponsored his Bulgarian-born husband, Traian “Tray” Popov, for a green card. “Oh my God, that’s totally amazing.”

Peetje2 / Creative Commons/Flickr

On The Florida Roundup, we take a look at three big decisions out of Washington, D.C. this week: the U.S. Supreme Court decisions on gay marriage and the Voting Rights Act as well as the U.S. Senate's vote on the immigration bill.

The Senate approved a sweeping immigration bill Thursday, endorsing a bill that would put millions of immigrants who illegally entered the United States on a path to citizenship. The final vote tally on the bill was 68 in favor, with 32 opposed.

The bill also includes measures that would punish employers who take advantage of immigrant workers, as well as providing billions in spending to employ fences and high-tech tools to help secure the border between the U.S. and Mexico.

All 52 Democratic senators voted for the bill, along with 14 Republicans and two independents.

U.S. Census Bureau

What do the rulings from the highest court in the United States mean for Florida's same-sex couples?  

We'll unpack the Supreme Court decisions and explain what impact they could have in the everyday lives of lesbian and gay couples, from tax filing to naturalization and wills.

Photo provided

Update, June 26: This post was originally published back in April of this year but we decided to rerun it in light of today's decision by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Last summer, my father-in-law entered the hospital in Germany. My wife, Lu Mueller-Kaul, desperately wanted to be with him. But she was in this country on a complicated visa that forbids her from returning if she leaves. She stayed as her father suffered, cursing the unfair system.

Roberto Koltun/The Miami Herald

Jose Antonio Machado was brought to Miami as an undocumented immigrant from Matagalpa, Nicaragua, when he was six years old. He grew up here with his mother, Melba, also an indocumentada, until she was deported two years ago after being pulled over for a traffic violation.

“I expected her home at 11:15 p.m. that night,” says Machado, now an 18-year-old who graduated this month from Miami Senior High School. “Eventually I fell asleep. The next morning I realized she wasn’t there.”

Pages