immigration

A federal appeals court denied President Trump's attempt to restore his travel ban on refugees and visa holders from seven majority-Muslim countries Sunday morning, sending people scrambling to board planes while it is legal once again for them to enter the country.

Katie Lepri / WLRN News

This week on The Florida Roundup...

Miami-Dade County Major Carlos Gimenez's decision to comply with President Trump's immigration detention order has sparked protests and calls to put it to a County Commission vote. We speak with Esteban Bovo, Chairman of the County Commission, about that impending meeting. 

Listen here: 

Peter Haden / WLRN

Around 3,000 protesters took to the streets of West Palm Beach Saturday, hoping to be seen by President Donald Trump.

Do you know where your congressional delegates stand on president Donald Trump's immigration order? 

NPR and dozens of member stations like WLRN wanted to help the public understand where its lawmakers stand on the issue. Collectively, we searched for public statements on Twitter and Facebook, on lawmakers' websites and in interviews with us in public media or other news organizations. We did this for each of the 536 members of Congress — 100 senators, 435 voting members of the House, and the District of Columbia's nonvoting House delegate.

The Statue of Liberty was modeled after an Arab woman

Feb 1, 2017
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Brendan McDermid/Reuters

As Americans grapple with Donald Trump's ban on travelers from seven Muslim-majority countries, it's a good time to point out a little-known irony. The Statue of Liberty — that symbol of American freedom and diversity that has greeted immigrants for generations — was originally modeled after an Arab woman.

The statue's designer, Frédéric-Auguste Bartholdi, was enamored with Egyptian pyramids and monumental sculpture. According to historian Edward Berenson, in the 1860s, Bartholdi decided to build a monument to commemorate the opening of Egypt's Suez Canal.

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Robert Galbraith/Reuters

Context matters.

And the context of Trump’s executive orders on immigration are a long history of excluding immigrants on the basis of national origin, political and religious beliefs and in the name of national security.

Peter Haden / WLRN

President Donald Trump’s executive order temporarily banning refugees and migrants from seven mostly-Muslim countries caused confusion in South Florida Sunday. From the Palm Beach International Airport, to a civil rights gathering in Lake Worth, to a musical performance in Fort Lauderdale – residents and visitors process and protest the president's action.

It's been a tense week for immigrants and people of color throughout the country, but there was some good news in California: a new study by the advocacy group National Council of La Raza points out that the state's Latinos, as a group, are doing much better in many areas.

Emilly Michot / Miami Herald

Protests continued on Tuesday against Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez’s decision to bow to President Trump’s demands on immigration detentions.

Madeline Fox / WLRN News

Protesters in Miami-Dade took to the streets for the second time in less than a week to protest the county's Mayor's recent decision to effectively abandon the county’s stance as a “sanctuary” for undocumented immigrants. 

Carlos Gimenez's order, issued last Thursday in response to President Donald Trump’s executive order aimed at denying federal funds to “sanctuary cities,” asked county jails to comply with federal immigration requests.

CHELSEA BECK / NPR

President Trump has issued an executive order temporarily banning travel from seven Muslim-majority countries. The move, which has raised a series of legal questions, sparked protests around the country as people who had previously been approved to come to the United States were being detained at airports. Here is the order in full, annotated by NPR journalists.

Why this policy expert supports Trump's immigration ban

Jan 31, 2017
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Brian Snyder/Reuters

President Donald Trump’s immigration ban is sparking protests at home and dissent abroad. But Trump supporter Mark Krikorian says detractors need to calm down.

“This is just a temporary pause. That’s the point,” Krikorian says. “This isn’t the policy about how we’re going to screen people coming from countries where there are active jihad terror groups.”

Krikorian is the executive director of the right-leaning Center for Immigration Studies, a think tank. He is one of the leading intellectual architects of the movement to restrict immigration to the United States.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations is suing President Donald Trump over his travel ban. The ban restricts refugees and travelers from certain Muslim-majority countries.

Updated at 10:30 p.m. ET

President Trump has fired Acting Attorney General Sally Yates, concluding she has "betrayed the Department of Justice" by refusing to defend his executive order that imposes a temporary ban on refugees and visa holders from seven majority-Muslim countries.

In a statement, the White House called Yates, an Obama administration holdover with 27 years of experience prosecuting corrupt public officials and the man who bombed the Atlanta Olympic park, "weak on borders and very weak on illegal immigration."

Saira Rafiee boarded a plane in Tehran this weekend on her way to New York. She had been visiting family in Iran and needed to get back to the U.S. in time for classes at City University of New York's Graduate Center, where she is a Ph.D. student in political science. But, as a result of President Trump's executive order restricting the travel of citizens from seven majority-Muslim countries, including Iran, Rafiee says she was detained in Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates and, after nearly 18 hours, sent back to Tehran.

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