immigration

Saira / Courtesy

The country is grappling with how to handle the influx of Central American children who have come to the United States over the past few months. And as Central America has become more and more violent, more families have been coming to South Florida too.

Over the last year more than 55,000 families were apprehended at the U.S.-Mexico border. That’s almost six times more than the same time period a year ago.

Florida is one of the top five states receiving this influx of immigrants.

cooldesign / freedigitalphotos.net

This week on the Florida Roundup, we're exploring why subsidies to help nearly a million Floridians buy health insurance are on shaky ground.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Hear From Children Seeking Refuge In Miami From Violence Below The Border

Jul 23, 2014
Emily Michot / Miami Herald staff

As tens of thousands children from Central America have been fleeing for the United States, U.S. society is trying to figure out how to deal with the crisis -- at many different levels.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Miami Herald, Mario Diaz-Balart, Lincoln Diaz-Balart

 

Take our quiz on South Florida's political families.  

When immigrants leave their country, they usually leave their connections and name recognition behind. But that doesn’t apply to Cubans in South Florida, which is home to almost half of the U.S. Cuban population.

toddwmiller.wordpress.com

07/08/14 - Tuesday’s Topical Currents looks at the issue of  U.S. Border Patrol and Homeland Security's ever-widening reach into the lives of American citizens and legal immigrants as well as the undocumented. We visit with investigative journalist Todd Miller.  He’s spent the last fifteen years researching, writing about and working on immigration and border issues.

Jose A. Iglesias / El Nuevo Herald

It’s easy to think the current crisis of undocumented child migrants from Central America affects only the U.S. Southwest. But the problem is very much South Florida’s too.

Miami Herald

Some conservatives say the recent primary loss of House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-Va.) shows a Republican like former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush cannot win a presidential primary because of his views on immigration. Bush and another Florida politician hoping for the presidency are taking very different approaches to the issue.

As the dust settles on Cantor's stunning primary loss, some analysts say he was ousted because he was seen as a Washington insider. Others say Virginia’s open primary allowed Democrats and independents to sabotage his race.

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