immigration

The first week of the Trump administration has been marked by a flurry of executive actions — and lots of bombast and argument with the press.

Miami Herald

Fearing a loss of millions of dollars for defying immigration authorities, Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez on Thursday ordered county jails to comply with federal immigration detention requests — effectively gutting the county’s position as a “sanctuary” for immigrants in the country illegally.

Trump just signed an executive order to start building a wall at the border

Jan 25, 2017
U
Jose Luis Gonzalez/Reuters 

US President Donald Trump took a first step toward fulfilling his pledge to "build a wall" on the Mexican border Wednesday, signing two immigration-related decrees.

Trump visited the Department of Homeland Security to approve an order to begin work to "build a large physical barrier on the southern border," according to the White House.

Trump also signed measures to "create more detention space for illegal immigrants along the southern border," according to White House spokesman Sean Spicer.

Updated at 5:50 p.m. ET

President Trump has signed two executive orders related to immigration and border security, moving ahead with his plans to build a wall along the U.S. border with Mexico and to deport people who are in the country illegally.

Miami Herald-Jennifer Smits

This week on The Florida Roundup...

The Obama administration repealed the "wet foot, dry foot" policy for Cubans. This ends a special privilege that allowed Cubans who make it to U.S. sand or soil to stay. 

There's a popular saying in Spanish — O todos en la cama, o todos en el suelo. It conveys a selfless commitment to equal treatment, and translates roughly like this: Either we all get the bed, or we all get the floor.

Among many immigrants in the U.S., there's been a feeling that when it comes to the spoils of U.S. immigration policy, the government has given Cubans the bed all to themselves, while it has relegated others — Mexicans, Haitians, Central Americans — to the floor.

Madeline Fox / WLRN News

As it got dark on Thursday evening, Cuban Americans congregated in the light put out by the cafecito window of Versailles, the Cuban café on Calle Ocho, to talk about the sudden end of decades-old policy granting Cuban migrants special status in U.S. immigration.

Desmond Boylan / AP

WASHINGTON — President Barack Obama is ending a longstanding immigration policy that allows any Cuban who makes it to U.S. soil to stay and become a legal resident, a senior administration official said Thursday.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

As a new federal administration takes over in Washington D.C. — after an election in which immigration issues were prominent — one South Florida city may take a stand on the issue.

Key West City Commissioner Jimmy Weekley said he wants his hometown to become a sanctuary city, adopting an official policy toward undocumented immigrants similar to the military's old "don't ask, don't tell" policy on sexual orientation.

Amanda Rabines / WLRN

South Florida families who have been directly affected by immigration laws are using the holidays to convey a message of unity.

More than a dozen of the sons and daughters of undocumented parents gathered in Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez’s office on Wednesday afternoon to sing Christmas carols and ask him take measures to protect their families for the next coming years.

Among the early bills already being filed for Florida’s 2017 legislative session is a measure from Rep. Dane Eagle, R-Cape Coral, that would increase penalties for undocumented immigrants who commit violent crimes. Supporters say the measure sends a message to federal immigration authorities and would increase public safety. Opponents question its constitutionality. 

President-elect Donald Trump says he will double the nation's growth rate during his time in office. That promise will be difficult to keep.

Trump isn't talking about a temporary boost in growth. He says he can make the economy grow in the long term at a rate of about 4 percent a year.

R
Eduardo Munoz/Reuters

There is a small undocumented workforce that's almost exclusively white. And they're far from the shadows — they're plastered atop billboards, spread across magazine covers and strutting down the catwalks.

It is, by all appearances, a glamorous industry. But many of the international models fueling a $385.7 billion fashion industry in the US are working without papers. They come from the Netherlands, Russia, Brazil, Australia, Canada and Europe.

As a child, Francisco Ortega lived in rural Tijuana, Mexico, 100 miles south of where he lives with his family now.

"We were so poor, but I used to say my mother kept the best dirt floors ever," he told his 16-year-old daughter, Kaya during a recent visit to StoryCorps. "They were the cleanest dirt floors in the planet.

White House

Eduardo Padrón has been the president of Miami-Dade College for more than 21 years. In that time, he expanded the college to offer hundreds of degrees to tens of thousands of students, especially for immigrant students, all while keeping education affordable. 

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