immigration

The Obama Administration has announced another significant reset of national deportation law that could allow hundreds of thousands of illegal immigrants to apply for legal residency without leaving the country.

It was another use of the president's executive power, analysts say, to soften the ground for major legislative immigration reforms ahead.

The new policy applies to immigrants who are spouses, parents or children of U. S. citizens and would otherwise face long family separations under the previous process of applying for residency.

ernstl /Flickr

As state and federal lawmakers roll out and implement the health care reform law over the next few years,  millions of people living in the U.S. who didn't have health insurance will gain insurance. However, in a state like Florida, thousands of people won't be included in those changes-- and that is because they are undocumented.

Geoff Holtzman /Flickr

U.S. Senator Marco Rubio, R-FL, gave reporters some details about what the GOP version of the Dream Act might look like recently.

Tom Wolfe wrote his new novel, Back to Blood, entirely by hand. But the author of The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test and The Bonfire of the Vanities also says that wasn't entirely by choice — he'd rather have used a typewriter.

"Unfortunately, you can't keep typewriters going today — you have to take the ribbons back to be re-inked," Wolfe tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies. "There's a horrible search to try to find missing parts."

Cuba Softens Travel Restrictions With A Big Catch

Oct 16, 2012
Fotos Gov/Ba/ Flickr

Today the Cuban government announced that Cubans will no longer need an exit visa from the state in order to leave the country for travel, etc. However, the government simultaneously cracked down on travel for high skilled workers.

As of January 14, 2012, Cubans will only need a visa from the country they are traveling to in order to leave the country. 

DeusXFlorida/flickr

Immigration and agriculture go hand in hand.

That's what community and business leaders in Tallahassee recently heard from Florida Agriculture Commissioner Adam Putnam.

He said immigration reform is vital to the health of the state’s agriculture industry

Putnam told the Economic Club of Florida he is concerned the U.S. is losing business to developing countries that have different standards for hiring farm workers.

'Subtle, Subtle' Racism: Why Jeb Bush Moved To Miami

Oct 15, 2012
World Affairs Council of Philadelphia/Flickr

New York Magazine published a great profile of Florida's former governor and current Miamian Jeb Bush this week.

The profile tackled some pretty big topics about Bush, who has stayed mostly out of the limelight since he finished his term as Florida's governor in 2007. The article mentioned how Jeb's connections to the Hispanic community might make him the greatest hope for the future of the GOP and why he didn't run in 2012.

WLRN

Green Card Stories (Umbrage Books) is a collection of profiles and photographs of fifty immigrants from around the country by journalist Saundra Amrhein and photographer Ariana Lindquist.  Amrhein has been a journalist for seventeen years.  She spent ten years at the St. Petersburg Times (now the Tampa Bay Times.)  Immigrants profiled include a triathelete, a magician, a flea market worker, small business owners and executives.

Sarah Gonzalez/StateImpact Florida

Juan Galvez is going into 4th grade. His parents are from Bolivia and Guatemala, and they only speak Spanish.

When it comes to homework, Juan is usually on his own.

“My mom helps me a little because she knows the math,” says Juan. “But with reading, I’m good. I do it by myself.”

Lost Between Two Nations

Jan 11, 2012
Jacob Kushner

When an earthquake struck Haiti in January 2010, the United States stopped deporting Haitian immigrants to the devastated nation. But deportations resumed last January, and Franco Coby, 24, of Fort Myers, found himself banished from the country he grew up in since the age of 6.

Surviving Survival: Earthquake Victims In Limbo

Sep 7, 2011
Tina Antolini

After the earthquake hit Haiti in 2010, thousands of Haitians fled to South Florida to escape the devastation in their country. Some were able to leave Haiti on tourist visas. Others came as guardians to their injured children. No matter how they came to the country, most have been living in limbo in the United States.

New Policy Gives Hope To Some Facing Deportation

Aug 21, 2011
Courtesy of Melissa

The Obama administration on Thursday said it would review the deportation cases of 300,000 illegal immigrants. The administration wants to put high priority on removing convicted criminals, and low priority on cases that involve people who pose no security threat.

That might make a big difference for thousands of undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as children.

New Hope For One Student

Confessions Of A Refugee Boy

Apr 7, 2011
Simon & Schuster

Learning to Die in Miami is author Carlos Eire’s follow-up to his 2003 memoir, Waiting for Snow in Havana. In his first book, Eire wrote about his childhood in Cuba before and during the Castro revolution.

Kenny Malone

 

A few days after the earthquake, the U.S. government decided that Haitians living in the United States would be eligible for Temporary Protected Status, or TPS.  However, there has been much confusion about who can apply, how you apply and what happens after you apply for TPS.

A Special Hour On Haiti

Jul 17, 2010
WLRN

In this episode, we look at how the Jan. 12 earthquake in Haiti changed life here in South Florida. We tell stories from a school that absorbed quake survivors, from a church that opened its doors to the grief-stricken, from lawyers’ offices where Haitians applied for an immigration shield, and from a hospital tent where tired doctors were uplifted by a song.

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