immigration

It's been a tense week for immigrants and people of color throughout the country, but there was some good news in California: a new study by the advocacy group National Council of La Raza points out that the state's Latinos, as a group, are doing much better in many areas.

Emilly Michot / Miami Herald

Protests continued on Tuesday against Miami-Dade Mayor Carlos Gimenez’s decision to bow to President Trump’s demands on immigration detentions.

Madeline Fox / WLRN News

Protesters in Miami-Dade took to the streets for the second time in less than a week to protest the county's Mayor's recent decision to effectively abandon the county’s stance as a “sanctuary” for undocumented immigrants. 

Carlos Gimenez's order, issued last Thursday in response to President Donald Trump’s executive order aimed at denying federal funds to “sanctuary cities,” asked county jails to comply with federal immigration requests.

CHELSEA BECK / NPR

President Trump has issued an executive order temporarily banning travel from seven Muslim-majority countries. The move, which has raised a series of legal questions, sparked protests around the country as people who had previously been approved to come to the United States were being detained at airports. Here is the order in full, annotated by NPR journalists.

Why this policy expert supports Trump's immigration ban

Jan 31, 2017
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Brian Snyder/Reuters

President Donald Trump’s immigration ban is sparking protests at home and dissent abroad. But Trump supporter Mark Krikorian says detractors need to calm down.

“This is just a temporary pause. That’s the point,” Krikorian says. “This isn’t the policy about how we’re going to screen people coming from countries where there are active jihad terror groups.”

Krikorian is the executive director of the right-leaning Center for Immigration Studies, a think tank. He is one of the leading intellectual architects of the movement to restrict immigration to the United States.

The Council on American-Islamic Relations is suing President Donald Trump over his travel ban. The ban restricts refugees and travelers from certain Muslim-majority countries.

Updated at 10:30 p.m. ET

President Trump has fired Acting Attorney General Sally Yates, concluding she has "betrayed the Department of Justice" by refusing to defend his executive order that imposes a temporary ban on refugees and visa holders from seven majority-Muslim countries.

In a statement, the White House called Yates, an Obama administration holdover with 27 years of experience prosecuting corrupt public officials and the man who bombed the Atlanta Olympic park, "weak on borders and very weak on illegal immigration."

Saira Rafiee boarded a plane in Tehran this weekend on her way to New York. She had been visiting family in Iran and needed to get back to the U.S. in time for classes at City University of New York's Graduate Center, where she is a Ph.D. student in political science. But, as a result of President Trump's executive order restricting the travel of citizens from seven majority-Muslim countries, including Iran, Rafiee says she was detained in Abu Dhabi in the United Arab Emirates and, after nearly 18 hours, sent back to Tehran.

Is the commander in chief also acting as the troller in chief?

President Trump on Monday morning ridiculed Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer, who became emotional Sunday while condemning the president's travel ban, which temporarily bars travelers from seven Muslim-majority countries.

"I noticed Chuck Schumer yesterday with fake tears," Trump said during an Oval Office photo op with small-business leaders. "I'm going to ask him who is his acting coach."

Amanda Rabines / WLRN News

Americans gathered at a number of U.S. airports over the weekend – including Miami International Airport, Fort Lauderdale International Airport and Palm Beach International Airport – to protest President Donald J. Trump’s order to keep many foreigners out of the country.

Updated at 6:55 p.m. ET

They began Saturday as a series of pop-up demonstrations outside several major airports. But by Sunday, the protests against President Trump's temporary immigration freeze had leapt from those airports to squares and plazas in cities across the U.S.

Outside the White House, in Boston's Copley Square and Battery Park in New York City, immigrant advocacy groups have organized protests to register their discontent with the executive order Trump signed Friday.

Updated at 7 p.m. ET

By the time the sun rose on Sunday in the U.S., the chaotic weekend set in motion by Trump's executive order on immigration was beginning to give way to greater clarity — in some respects, at least.

Florida House Democrats protested Republican Speaker Richard Corcoran’s decision to give a platform to a man they said is a racist.

Updated 2 p.m. ET

President Trump's freeze on immigration from seven mostly Muslim countries cites the potential threat of terrorism. But here's the twist — it doesn't include any countries from which radicalized Muslims have actually killed Americans in the U.S. since Sept. 11, 2001.

The president's executive action, which he signed Friday at the Pentagon, applies to these countries: Syria, Iran, Libya, Somalia, Yemen, Iraq and Sudan.

Amanda Rabines / WLRN

On Facebook, the public event called for quick action. 

Organizers of the “Emergency Rally in Miami Against Trump Muslim Ban” gave people a two-day notice to attend. 

The rally brought together dozens of demonstrators Thursday night to stand in solidarity with Muslim and immigrant communities at the Torch of Friendship monument along Biscayne Boulevard in Miami.  

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