immigration

Holly Pretsky / WLRN

Attorney General Jeff Sessions is narrowing the scope of an executive order on so-called sanctuary cities.

A federal judge in California last month blocked a key part of that order, reasoning that the Trump administration had overstepped by threatening to yank federal money from those places.

Holly Pretsky / WLRN

The N-400 application, the application for US citizenship, is 20 pages long. There are a lot of questions that require a lot of detail. The process can be daunting, especially for people for whom English still isn't totally familiar.

These are challenges that Catholic Legal Services' "Mega Citizenship" event tried to address this past weekend in  14 different locations across Miami-Dade, Broward, and Palm Beach counties. Each location was staffed with volunteers trained to help with the N-400. Many of them were attorneys.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

Key West has long prided itself on its all-welcome ethos and has an official city motto of "One Human Family."

Tuesday, the City Commission approved a resolution affirming those values and vowing that all city services would remain accessible to all residents "regardless of immigration status." The resolution also stated that the city would not investigate or help investigate immigration status unless it was required to by state or federal law.

R
Carlos Barria/Reuters

Students from the Middle East, Asia and Latin America are growing more fearful of attending college in the US.

That’s according to a recent survey by the American Association of College Registrar and Admissions Officers. Higher education institutions have reported a decline in international student applications and, experts say, the current political climate is a factor.

Holly Pretsky / WLRN

Hundreds of protesters gathered in Miami Saturday morning chanting "Donald Trump! TPS now!"

The crowd intermittently swelled off the sidewalks on either side of NW 7th Avenue, outside the US Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) Miami Field Office, slowing traffic. 

Concerns that President Trump may not renew TPS status for Haitians intensified after the Associated Press obtained emails from the USCIS inquiring about Haitians' criminal backgrounds.

Holly Pretsky / WLRN

Florida Congresswoman Debbie Wasserman Schultz called the Trump administration's immigration policies "abhorrent and horrific" Thursday  morning after a private roundtable with Miami-area immigrant advocates.

"There has been fear sown through our immigrant community... causing them to fear interacting with any government entity," said Wasserman Schultz.

Representatives from Catholic Charities, FANM or Haitian Women of Miami, the American Immigration Lawyers Association and other groups were among those who met with Wasserman Schultz at her Sunrise office.

AP Photo/Kathy Willens

Henry Flagler’s railroad and Napoleon Broward’s pledge to drain the Everglades forged the beginnings of today’s modern South Florida. No two forces have been as influential on the economy as immigration and real estate. The two are intertwined with Flagler and Gov. Broward. Immigrants provided the labor, while the railroad and draining of the Everglades opened up real estate.

We asked for listener questions about the economy and several of them were focused on these two issues.

WHAT'S YOUR QUESTION? SUBMIT IT HERE.

Immigration advocates claim that about half of the most lucrative startups in America were founded by immigrants. But it's complicated for a foreigner to start a company in America — there's no such thing as a startup visa.

That's why some entrepreneurs are "hacking the system" through a workaround that started as an experiment in Massachusetts and has expanded to five other states.

President Trump has been tweeting about a federal court ruling that temporarily blocked his plan to suspend funding for "sanctuary cities."

These are cities — among them New York, Los Angeles, Houston, Chicago and San Francisco — that have limited their cooperation with federal immigration authorities. For example, they may refuse to detain people who are in the U.S. illegally on behalf of the federal agents.

Now, the Trump tweets:

About 1 million Americans live in Mexico, and many of them do so illegally. But it’s much easier to navigate life in Mexico as an immigrant without proper documents than it is in the United States.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson explores this with two people who have firsthand experience with the differences.

Editor’s Note: Here & Now agreed not to use our guests’ last names for this conversation.

Interview Highlights

On Eddie’s immigration story and the limitations of his status

Updated 11:45 p.m. ET

A federal judge ruled Tuesday that the Trump administration cannot withhold federal funds from jurisdictions that limit their cooperation with immigration authorities, commonly known as sanctuary cities.

For the first time in more than a decade, Mexicans no longer make up the majority of immigrants staying in the U.S. illegally, according to new estimates by the Pew Research Center.

Read a version of this story in Spanish.

As the White House pushes Congress to fund President Trump's U.S.-Mexico border wall, a new wrinkle has emerged that could stymie parts of the massive project.

Miami Passport Office Shut Down Until Further Notice

Apr 24, 2017
Tim Sackton / Flickr

Getting a U.S. passport for many residents of the Southeast just became a tougher task with the closing of the U.S. State Department’s Miami Passport Agency for possibly two weeks.

The agency’s website says the office at 1501 W. Biscayne Blvd. in downtown Miami is closed to the public until further notice, unable to take appointments or process passports.

Callers to the appointment line, 877-487-2778, seeking times for the next two weeks are offered appointments at the agency offices in Atlanta or New Orleans.

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