immigration

AP

On Thursday, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a a one sentence ruling announcing, in fact, that it couldn't make a decision on President Obama’s executive action on immigration. The action, signed in 2014, would have granted temporary legal status and work permits to as many as 4 million parents of U.S. citizens who entered the U.S. illegally prior to 2010. For those millions waiting and hoping the court would rule in favor of the executive action, what happens now?

Listen to that discussion below:

Lisann Ramos

 

South Florida immigration groups rallied in front of the Freedom Tower in downtown Miami Thursday afternoon -- against the Supreme Court split that blocks President Obama's efforts to expand immigration programs.

Star Cuban Ballerinas Ready for Their U.S. Debut

Jun 8, 2016
Spencer Parts

Three of Cuba’s best dancers will make their U.S. debuts in the Cuban Classical Ballet of Miami’s performance next Saturday. The dancers came to the U.S. for the chance to expand their repertoire beyond classical ballet, but they start next Saturday with Giselle, a classic romantic ballet they knew well in Cuba.

Mayrel Martinez and Masiel Alonso were soloists in the Cuban National Ballet before they defected last month during a Cuban National Ballet tour in Canada. They arrived in the U.S. on May 9th. 

Spencer Parts / WLRN

Federal Judge Darrin Gayles will take at least another two weeks to consider whether the American Shoal Light House – located in the Florida Straits 7 miles off Sugarloaf Key – constitutes dry land. If he rules that it does, the 21 Cuban migrants that took refuge in it can stay in the U.S.

The group of migrants swam to the lighthouse after traveling by raft from Cuba, and were taken onto a Coast Guard cutter after an eight-hour standoff on May 20th. 

Surge In Cuban Migration Shows Up At MDC

May 31, 2016

The wait began long before daybreak: By sunrise, more than 100 people had shown up. At 8 a.m., the line stretched down past the end of the building and snaked across the parking lot. Tickets to Hamilton? The new Star Wars movie?

No. The prize today was a coveted spot in English classes through Miami Dade College’s REVEST program, or Refugee/Entrant Vocational Education Services Program. George Delacruz brought his wife to sign up at 4:30 a.m. “Everybody knows, you know, ‘Hey, you have to be early. If not, you’re out!’”

Collier County Public Schools

A lawsuit filed Wednesday alleges Collier County Public Schools are refusing to enroll immigrant students, a violation of federal and state law. Instead, the complaint says, 16- and 17-year-olds from Haiti and Guatemala have been steered to English-only adult-education classes.

R
Carlos Garcia Rawlins/Reuters

When Luis got home last month after four months in the US, he had to unpack his bags by candlelight. 

He had taken the trip to hone his English, and to look for work that would grant him a visa allowing him to live in the US. It took him months to save for the trip. 

But ultimately, the only job offer he received would’ve required him to live and work illegally in Washington, DC.

Diane Guerrero / Twitter

Diane Guerrero is best known as prison inmate Maritza Ramos in the acclaimed Netflix series “Orange Is the New Black.” Or as Lina in the CW series “Jane the Virgin,” set in Miami.

But Guerrero plays another, arguably more important role nowadays: celebrity immigration-reform spokesperson.

And for good reason. In 2001, when she was 14 years old, Guerrero came home from school one day to find her parents had disappeared. Her mother and father were undocumented immigrants from Colombia – and that day they had been deported.

Paul Sancya / AP via Miami Herald

From savior to suspended.

Florida Senator Marco Rubio - whom Time Magazine just a few years ago hailed as the Republican Party's "savior" - suspended his presidential campaign last night after losing his home state’s primary in a devastating landslide to Donald Trump. The political post-mortems on Rubio have begun – and so have the questions about his future.

Dario Lopez-Mills / AP via Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

The last time I reported from Juárez, Mexico, about five years ago, it was the most murderous city in the world – a desert slaughterhouse for drug lords like Joaquín “Chapo” Guzmán.

One evening a colleague and I popped into Juárez’s most famous bar, the Kentucky Club (supposedly the birthplace of the margarita). We had the place to ourselves. A homicide rate of more than 200 per 100,000 residents tends to depress nightlife.

Linnette Vasquez/flickr

It's a Valentine’s Day edition of the Florida Roundup featuring husband-and-wife media teams.

The Florida legislative session is at its midpoint. The death penalty remains on the agenda. The House and Senate are split over whether juries should agree unanimously in capital punishment cases.

Courtesy Rolling Stone via Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

I’d like to take acclaimed film actor and ridiculed crime writer Sean Penn to San Pedro Sula, Honduras, which until recently suffered the highest homicide rate of any city on the planet.

I’d like him to meet the families of the thousands of victims murdered by the maras, or narco-mafias, that are tied to Mexico’s powerful Sinaloa drug cartel.

Sammy Mack / WLRN

Florida State Rep. Carlos Trujillo is in the middle of some pressing and controversial issues this legislative session.

The South Florida Republican sponsored one bill that would close a health insurance gap and another that would make it illegal for people who have been deported to come back into Florida.

And before session even started, he took heat from the gun lobby for his position on a Stand Your Ground bill.

Trujillo sat down in his Tallahassee office on the first day of session to talk about his expectations this year and what that means for Floridians:

Florida had the second-biggest population gain of any state in the nation in the past year.

New figures released Tuesday by the U.S. Census Bureau shows Florida gained more than 365,000 people from July 2014 to July 2015.

Patrick Farrell / Miami Herald

In the latest in a series of similar cases, a South Florida appeals court Wednesday rejected legal-dependency requests from teens who fled Guatemala and Honduras and entered the United States as undocumented immigrants.

A determination of dependency, based on issues such as abandonment by parents or abuse, would help the teens apply for a special immigration status and seek permanent residency, according to court documents.

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