I-95

Alyce and Neil Robertson / Courtesy

There are details of this story that Alyce and Neil Robertson don’t quite agree on.

“We were on our way to a wedding on a Saturday afternoon,” recalls Alyce.

“A Sunday, yeah,” recalls Neil, “we were on our way to a wedding.”

This Saturday (or Sunday) wedding trip roughly 20 (or 30) years ago has become a go-to party story for the Robertsons, who can at least agree that they were disagreeing at the time.

I-95 Express Lanes Expanding To The North

May 19, 2015
Florida Department of Transportation

The Interstate 95 express lanes are advancing to the north. This week, workers began installing more plastic poles on northbound I-95, part of the “Phase 2” construction that will eventually extend the lanes into Broward County.

While the Florida Department of Transportation plans to expand both northbound and southbound express lanes to Davie Boulevard, the current construction is only on the northbound lanes and will stop at the Broward County line.

  Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Wait, I-95 Has A Speed Limit?

Feb 24, 2015
Kenny Malone

I spent last Thursday, in the thick of afternoon rush hour, at the I-95 on-ramp just southwest of the Arsht Center. At around 4:30 p.m., the scene is one-half auto show, one-half salmon-spawning.

I walked from open window to open window hoping to confirm something I’ve always suspected: People don’t really know what the speed limit is on I-95. Even the people seconds away from driving on it.

Greg Castillo

At around 5 a.m. on March 5, 2011, five motorists were standing on the emergency shoulder of the Interstate 95 express lanes after a series of accidents.

"Meanwhile, a drunk driver entered the toll lanes. Speeding. Lost control," says attorney Edward Blumberg. "And then struck all five people... and hit them head on."

Four people died on the scene, the fifth died at Jackson Memorial Hospital, according to police records.

Kenny Malone

There is nothing worse than a three paragraph preamble to a listicle. So all you need to know for this, in case you haven’t been following our End of the Road series, is that WLRN spent the last year doing stories about the final 87 miles of Interstate 95 -- the South Florida stretch. We’ve learned some very useful/strange things along the way.

Please enjoy the following facts for personal use and distribution while attending local cocktail and dinner parties.

Florida Department of Transportation

Those poor, orange plastic poles didn’t stand a chance against Bliss Aruj. The 17-year-old had just started driving. She was cruising along “in” the I-95 express lanes.

“My mom goes, ‘Bliss! You’re hitting the cones!’” Bliss recalls. “I think I might have taken out about 20 of them in a row.”

LISTEN: A Father-Daughter Dance With I-95 Destiny

Jan 14, 2015
Kenny Malone / WLRN

Sixteen-year-old Nina Galoppi says she and her friends simply call I-95 "The Big Road." Many of them avoid it altogether, opting instead for slower, smaller roads to get around.

"It's a really scary road when you think about it," Galoppi says. "That’s where the adults, that’s where trucks, everyone drives there. You don’t want to drive there if you don’t have to."

The Words Invented By South Florida's I-95 Drivers

Nov 30, 2014
Gregory Castillo / WLRN

When Arthur Bowditch Fay set out to chronicle his 300-mile Interstate 95 commute from Spotsylvania, Va. to Leonia, N.J., he came to the realization that the English language did not have the words to describe what he was seeing and doing.

So he invented those words:

dreamile (noun)
[dree-mahyl]
“The distance traveled while... daydreaming. Usually nothing of the dreamile is remembered.”

I, 95: A Man's Findings On A 300-Mile Commute

Nov 3, 2014
Graphic assembled by Kenny Malone (I-95 shield comes from "I, 95" book cover, map from Google Maps)

No bicycles allowed. Turn signals, believe it or not, are required before switching lanes. And if your car breaks down, you are supposed to move it, within six hours to be exact.

Those are some laws on Interstate 95. And then there are the laws of I-95:

FIRST     The less time you have to get to a destination, the more likely you will encounter traffic.

SECOND     Important signage will be displayed improminently or out of sight.

Kenny Malone

About 30 years ago, Hancock Advertising, Inc., was awarded eight of the first 10 permits to put billboards on the City of Miami’s highways. Seven of those billboards went up on Interstate 95. It would take a two-year legal battle over the word “on” to determine whether or not the eighth sign was also on I-95.

I-95 Is Still Insanely Bumpy And Here's Why

Oct 17, 2014
Kenny Malone

“Miami’s Southbound Interstate 95 from 153rd Street to 125th Street looks -- and feels -- like it was engineered by Pablo Picasso,” we reported last August.

Well, apparently I-95 is still in its Cubist phase.

If You See Blacked-Out 95 Express Signs, Here's Why

Oct 1, 2014
FDOT (http://sunguide.info/sunguide/index.php/gallery/express_lanes)

At best, the signs were confusing. At worst, an incentive to illegally pylon-jump between express and non-express lanes.

On Wednesday, the Florida Department of Transportation will shut down two problematic electronic 95 Express tolls signs: one above the northbound 95 express lanes near Northwest 54th Street and one on the southbound lanes near Northwest 144th Street.

“It really doesn’t add benefit at this point,” says Rory Santana, who runs the 95 Express system for FDOT.

Inside "Florida's Toll Lane Boom"

Sep 29, 2014
FDOT

As part of our End of the Road series, we’ve reported extensively on the so-called “Lexus Lanes” on I-95. In the 95 express lanes drivers can pay a toll to get around regular gridlock traffic. That toll varies based on how many car are piling into the express lanes at that moment. The more demand, the higher the toll -- to keep things moving.

The lanes were the first of their kind in Florida, but a new report from the Florida Center for Investigative Reporting says 95 Express is the future for Florida’s highways.

FDOT

An internal FDOT report shows more and more drivers are plowing past bright yellow “closed” signs and getting into 95 Express when the lanes are technically shut down for accidents or broken-down vehicles. But the Florida Highway Patrol can’t enforce the signs because they’re the wrong color: yellow-on-black  instead of black-and-white.

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