hurricanes

NASA

Thousands of scientists are working on research related to climate change and extreme weather.

Dr. Tim Hall is one of them. Dr. Hall is a Senior Research Scientist with NASA and adjunct professor at Columbia University. He has been studying weather patterns and their correlations to climate change. He says wind, flooding and rainfall can affect the intensity of a hurricane.

NASA scientists have begun to prove that hurricanes are getting worse. In the last year they have collected date on Hurricane Irma, Maria and Harvey.

Legal Hotline For Hurricane Victims To Close

Jun 11, 2018

Floridians who were affected by Hurricane Irma and need legal advice have until the end of the week to call a free hotline.

NASA JOHNSON / FLICKR CREATIVE COMMONS

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announced Thursday it will begin releasing water Friday from Lake Okeechobee because of concerns over rising water levels.

While it's not unusual to discharge water during periods of heavy rain, it is unusual to start this early in the summer. 

"Historic rain across the region since the middle of May has caused the lake to rise more than a foot," said Col. Jason Kirk, Jacksonville District commander, in a press release. "We have to be prepared for additional water that could result from a tropical system."

Cammy Clark / Monroe County

With the Florida Keys being one of the hardest-hit areas during last year's hurricane season, Monroe County Emergency Management is now armed with a new alert system and website

New Alert! Monroe will send updates via text, call or email. Users sign up through the emergency management's new website, which focuses on preparedness, evacuation and recovery. 

National Hurricane Center / NOAA

The forecasters got Hurricane Irma mostly right. At least compared to the predictions of past storms. That’s one of the conclusions from a National Hurricane Center report on the big storm that hit Florida last September.

While images of destruction caused by last year's battery of hurricanes are still fresh in the minds of many Americans, including those living on Puerto Rico where after six months power is not fully restored, forecasters are cautioning the public to brace themselves for another busy hurricane season.

House Eyes Plan For Health Care During Hurricanes

Feb 16, 2018

During the next major storm, Florida may turn to university faculty and even students enrolled in health-care programs to help work with some of the state’s most vulnerable residents. 

Tim Padgett / WLRN.org

Last week the renowned Key West Literary Seminar held its 36th annual gathering – and the theme of this year’s four-day event was “Writers of the Caribbean.” Thanks to President Trump, it turned out the organizers could not have picked a timelier subject.

Adopta un Bolsillo / Twitter

This Friday, Dec. 15, is the day Puerto Rico’s governor pledged to have all the island’s electric power restored. That’s not going to happen – but some Puerto Ricans have gotten power back after their long, long night in the dark.

The continuing blackouts in Puerto Rico after Hurricanes Irma and Maria have overshadowed the devastation in the neighboring U.S. Virgin Islands, where nearly 73 percent of residents remain without power two months after the Category 5 storms made landfall.

Juan Flores and his family live in Galena Park, Texas, which is bordered on three sides by pipeline terminals, oil refineries, fertilizer plants and rail yards.

Flores has lived in the town of about 11,000 people just east of downtown Houston since he was 4 years old. For a while, he even served on the City Council.

Nancy Klingener / WLRN

Monroe County released a preliminary damage assessment of residential structures in the unincorporated parts of the county Wednesday. 

Café Hacienda San Pedro, a trendy coffee shop in San Juan, is buzzing. A long line snakes through it. People are chatting; dogs sit snoozing. Everything looks normal.

But in a few months, it probably won't.

Jerry Lieberman / Keys Energy Services

Even though the Lower Florida Keys took a direct hit from Hurricane Irma, the storm did not disconnect the Keys power line to the mainland.

Much of Key West, at the end of the line, had power within days of the storm — much faster than many places on the mainland, which had much weaker winds from Irma.

Mark Hedden / markhedden.com

Almost 20 years ago, a little radio station from the Lower Keys won an Edward R. Murrow award — one of the highest honors in broadcasting. WWUS was recognized for continuously broadcasting during and after Hurricane Georges, a Category 2 storm that pummeled the Lower Keys.

But it turns out that effort was just a warm-up act for Hurricane Irma.

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