hurricanes

Wikipedia

Think about how much life has changed since Hurricane Andrew, some 24 years ago. We likely had that wall phone in the kitchen with the really, really, really long cord. We got most of our news from television, radio or newspapers. The web was something Spiderman produced as he battled villains. 

Here's A Reminder Of What You Need In Case Of Hurricane

Oct 4, 2016
FPREN / Courtesy

It's been 11 years since the last major hurricane hit South Florida, so we'd like to help you find and dust off your hurricane supplies.

It's best to buy and prep now to avoid long lines and stores running out of stock.

Here's what you need in a disaster supply kit:

Monroe County Public Library

  Eighty years ago, hurricanes weren't given human names. So the storm that devastated the Upper Keys in 1935 is known simply by the day it swept across Islamorada: the Labor Day Hurricane.

Islamorada in 1935 was a small village of a few hundred people, scraping through the Depression growing Key limes and pineapples. The village was also the site of a camp for hundreds more: relief workers building a highway. Most of those workers were World War I veterans.

Hurricane Evacuation On Florida’s Highways Under Construction

May 31, 2016

Florida’s population along the coast has boomed in the eleven years since the last hurricane hit. That combined with miles of construction on major highways could make evacuating ahead of a storm an even bigger headache this hurricane season.

Hurricanes Retired

Apr 26, 2016

Three tropical storm names have been retired. You will never again face a Joaquin or an Erika.

The World Meteorological Organization announced this week that it will retire three names. Two of them are  Atlantic storm names, and the third is Patricia, a eastern North Pacific storm name.

Joaquin and Erika will instead be replaced with Elsa and Julian. 

Storm names are reused every six years. But some names are retired when a storm is so deadly or costly that its future use would be insensitive.

Sammy Mack / WLRN via Giphy

There’s a plot of land behind the swimming pool at Deerfield Beach High where science teacher Kelly Caputo points to a cluster of trees out in a field.

“You can see five large Australian pines,” says Caputo. “And as beautiful as they are, they’re non-native — they take up a lot of space, water — and if we do get heavy winds, they’re probably going to create a lot of damage.”

Mark Hedden / For WLRN

  Before Hurricane Wilma's winds swept across mainland South Florida, the storm's waters surged over the Florida Keys — the largest storm surge the islands had seen since Hurricane Betsy in 1965.

Updated at 8:05 p.m. ET

The National Hurricane Center says the eye of Hurricane Patricia has made landfall near Cuixmala on Mexico's southwestern Pacific coast. Its winds were measured at 165 mph, somewhat weakened but still a Category 5 storm capable of catastrophic damage.

Our original post continues:

Updated 5:30 p.m. ET

Extinguishing hope that the cargo ship that went missing near the Bahamas could have survived a Thursday encounter with Hurricane Joaquin, the Coast Guard announced Monday that the ship, El Faro, sank, according to the Associated Press. The Coast Guard also found an unidentified body of one crew member.

Tropical Development Possible In The Gulf Next Week

Sep 24, 2015
WUFT

The last six tropical storms to develop in the Atlantic Basin haven't made it through the so-called El Niño barrier in the Caribbean.

This is where upper level winds have been too strong to support upscale development or even passage of a storm. Two have tried (Danny, Erika), but the others haven't even come close (Fred, Grace, Henri, Ida).

A new but controversial study asks if an end is coming to the busy Atlantic hurricane seasons of recent decades.

The Atlantic looks like it is entering in to a new quieter cycle of storm activity, like in the 1970s and 1980s, two prominent hurricane researchers wrote Monday in the journal Nature Geoscience.

Miami Herald

Even with all the radar technology that's available, it's hard to predict what any storm will do (i.e. Hurricane Jeanne). Let's face it, mother nature is not easy to predict.

Erika, which threatened South Florida last week,  was frustrating to forecasters because it didn't want to behave the way some models had pegged it. But, that's not completely unusual according to James Franklin. He oversees forecasters at the National Hurricane Center. 

What about Erika made it hard to forecast? 

Erika Dissolves, Heavy Rain Still Possible In Florida

Aug 29, 2015
Florida Public Radio Emergency Network

Tropical Storm Erika proved to be no match for the volatile conditions aloft and the mountainous terrain of Hispaniola.

As of 9:30 a.m. Saturday morning, the storm had dissolved into a tropical wave.

The National Hurricane Center issued their final advisory on the tropical cyclone, stating that hurricane hunters were unable to find an organized center of circulation.

C.M. Guerrero / El Nuevo Herald

With Tropical Storm Erika on a course to barrel into Florida, Gov. Rick Scott on Friday declared a state of emergency for the entire state.

The executive order pointed to updated forecasts from the National Hurricane Center indicating the storm likely will "travel up the spine of Florida's peninsula." Erika is now expected to remain a tropical storm, rather than turn into a more-powerful hurricane.

Florida Remains in Path of Tropical Storm Erika

Aug 26, 2015
NOAA

Ten years to the week that Hurricane Katrina devastated the Gulf Coast after making initial landfall in Florida, another storm appears to be bearing down on the Sunshine State.

As of Wednesday afternoon, Tropical Storm Erika is less than five days from potential landfall in the state and nearly all of Florida’s east coast lies within the cone of uncertainty.

At the state Emergency Operations Center in Tallahassee, things are still relatively quiet right now, but the center has been partially activated in advance of the storm.

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