hurricane

Hurricane preparedness goes beyond boarding windows and stocking up on water. Should an evacuation be necessary, many South Florida residents have not only themselves, but their furry friends to worry about as well.

Douglas Hanks / Miami Herald

Hours before the National Hurricane Center issued a  tropical storm and hurricane watches for South Florida ahead of Hurricane Matthew,  Miami-Dade County Mayor Carlos Gimenez asked residents to be prepared for tropical storm-force winds by Thursday.

“The message is very simple right now, it’s: You should be prepared for the eventuality of a hurricane,” said Gimenez.

Updated at 4:45 p.m. ET with further states of emergency in the U.S.

Hurricane Matthew crashed into southwestern Haiti as a Category 4 storm Tuesday morning, dumping rain and scouring the land with maximum sustained winds of 145 miles per hour.

It is the first Category 4 storm to make landfall in Haiti since 1964, when Hurricane Cleo also hit the island nation's southwestern peninsula.

FPREN

The National Hurricane Center (NHC) upgraded the hurricane watch in effect for Palm Beach and Broward Counties to a hurricane warning, which means that hurricane conditions are expected by Thursday in the area that spans from Sebastian Inlet to Golden Beach. 

Florida Governor Rick Scott issued a state of emergency Monday for the entire state of Florida in preparation for Hurricane Matthew.  
 He says his biggest concern is that the Category 4 storm could veer west and pummel the east coast of Florida.   

“If it makes a dramatic turn to the west, we’re not going to have a lot of time to get prepared,” Scott said. “So you need to get prepared today. Get your water, get your shelter.”

The National Hurricane Center is warning that Hurricane Matthew will "bring life-threatening rain, wind and storm surge" to parts of Haiti beginning Monday evening. People on multiple Caribbean islands are preparing for the Category 4 storm.

NOAA

People are looking a bit nervously at Invest 99L, the tropical disturbance heading up through the Bahamas.

Current projections have the storm making its way to South Florida by early next week, which, if you are a good citizen, should maybe strike a bell: Tuesday is election day.

So what happens to elections day if it also happens to be hurricane day?

Only the state has the authority to move or adjust voting times in light of things like weather or any other kind of interference.

The Weather Channel via Florida Dept. of Finance Services

Florida and it's big insurance companies are ready for a hurricane.

That's the message from four people at the center of the financial preparedness of the state and the insurance industry serving Florida homeowners. In an exclusive interview, each of them expressed confidence that the state, the state-backed insurance provider Citizens Property Insurance, and private insurers have the financial wherewithal to withstand a major storm like Hurricane Andrew or a series of storms like the 2004-2005 seasons hitting the state.

  The Players

Colorado State University

    

The 2016 Atlantic hurricane season is here and for the first time in decades South Florida will have to get through it without a man who was a pioneer in hurricane research. Dr. Bill Gray of Colorado State University (CSU) died in April. He's perhaps best known for his data-driven seasonal hurricane forecasts, which have been used for over 30 years.

WLRN talked to Dr. Phil Klotzbach, who started out as Dr. Gray's protegé and eventually became the other half of CSU’s hurricane forecast dynamic duo.

The state of Florida hasn't been hit with a hurricane in more than a decade, and that has state emergency managers concerned residents might not be prepared for the worst.


This year's Atlantic hurricane season is expected to be "near-normal," the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration says. The season runs from June 1 through Nov. 30.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=bBa9bVYKLP0

It’s not enough to just say you’ll be ready. National Hurricane Center Director Dr. Rick Knabb says you need a plan. And it’s easy.

Windows Lost To Wilma

Oct 26, 2015
Charles Trainor Jr. / Miami Herald

Before Hurricane Wilma hit Miami 10 years ago,  the tall buildings in Brickell had never had to contend with anything like the more than 100 mph winds the storm brought.

And while the buildings survived, their windows did not fare as well. Broken glass became one of lasting symbols of Wilma’s destruction.

The morning after Wilma made landfall, Santi Gabino left his apartment near Dadeland to go to work at the Four Seasons Hotel in Brickell. On the way in, he thought about picking up a cup of coffee and a donut.

Miami Herald

Even with all the radar technology that's available, it's hard to predict what any storm will do (i.e. Hurricane Jeanne). Let's face it, mother nature is not easy to predict.

Erika, which threatened South Florida last week,  was frustrating to forecasters because it didn't want to behave the way some models had pegged it. But, that's not completely unusual according to James Franklin. He oversees forecasters at the National Hurricane Center. 

What about Erika made it hard to forecast? 

Updated at 11:05 p.m. ET

Tropical Storm Erika has caused extensive flooding and landslides on the eastern Caribbean island of Dominica, killing at least four people and cutting power and water to many residents.

The storm dumped 9 inches of rain on the mountainous island late Wednesday.

"The situation is grim. It is dangerous," Ian Pinard, Dominica's communications minister, was quoted by The Associated Press as saying.

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