Nancy Klingener / WLRN

In the 1840s, Alexander Patterson was a notary public who recorded the depositions of shipwreck salvagers. He noted their accounts of efforts to save valuable cargos from ships that ran aground on the reefs along the Florida Keys.

Sometime during the 1860s and 1870s, someone — probably one of his daughters — used his logbook as a scrapbook, pasting onto its pages pictures and newspaper stories of the day.

DeWolfe and Wood Collection / Monroe County Public Library

 In the '60s, '70s and '80s, waves of Cuban immigrants crossed the Florida Straits, seeking political freedom and economic opportunity. Soon they were starting their own businesses and winning political office, infusing Cuban culture into the DNA of a South Florida city.

The city was Key West. And this was the 1860s, '70s and '80s.

WLRN filew

Broward County is a few weeks into a year-long run-up to its centennial in October of 2015, a century since Florida's second-biggest county was manufactured from pieces of Palm Beach and Dade counties.

Miami Herald

  Have you ever wondered why there is an Amelia Earhart Park in Hialeah near Opa-locka Executive Airport?

The missing pilot's last stop in the continental United States was in Miami in 1937 -- months before she vanished on her around-the-world flight attempt. What happened to her, where it happened and why has been one of aviation's more widely speculated-upon mysteries.

Now, a piece of metal -- likely attached as a repair before Earhart took off -- may have been identified in a Miami Herald photograph taken the day she disappeared.

Wikimedia Commons

Mark DeNote doesn't teach his middle school history students about beer. But he did write Florida's history of "the drink of the working class" in his book, "The Great Florida Craft Beer Guide."

MDC Unveils Berlin Wall On 25th Anniversary

Nov 10, 2014
Jessica Meszaros / WLRN

This past Sunday marked 25 years since the Berlin Wall was torn down. A wall that for nearly 30 years cut off the free West Berlin from the communist East Berlin and East Germany.

Miami Dade College commemorated the anniversary by unveiling a four-ton piece of that wall donated by Germany.

It was raining on and off at the downtown Wolfson campus -- similar weather to 25 years ago in Germany when the Berlin Wall was knocked down.

Meet The Tuskegee Airman In Your Own Backyard

Nov 10, 2014
Philip Hall / University of Alaska Anchorage for "Living history: Tuskegee aviator visits UAA." Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Lt. Col. Leo Gray was born in Boston in 1924. A trumpet player and track runner, he joined the Army in 1943. A year later, he flew solo for the first time, a training flight in Tuskegee, Ala.

Gray flew with the 332nd Fighter Group, arguably the most famous of the Tuskegee Airmen. In 1941, for the first time, the United States Army began training black pilots.The Army was still segregated and trained the men in the same location: Tuskegee.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

At the center of the Patricia and Phillip Frost Museum of Science’s Planetarium stands a masterpiece of its time: the Spitz Model B Space Transit Projector, a 1960s state-of-the-art machine that's the last of its kind still in use.

Forty-eight years ago, this heap of black aluminum began dazzling Miamians with the brilliance of an unadulterated night sky. In light of the museum's planned move to a new downtown building, the projector will probably not see another year of use.

10/28/14 - Today’s Topical Currents looks at the history of real estate and land usage in South Florida, since the inception of the City of Miami to today’s three-county urban mass. Not unlike other American communities, Miami’s black population was exploited by white entrepreneurs and politicians . . .


10/06/14 - Join us for Monday’s Topical Currents. We learn about little-known details of the largest military operation in history: World War II’s “Operation Overlord.”  Allied forces began it on “D-Day,” in June of 1944. The planning was meticulous, and the result was the beginning of the end for Hitler’s global domination plan. Literary contributor Ariel Gonzalez speaks with historian Rick Atkinson