history

Bridget O'Brien / WLRN News

This week on a special edition of The Florida Roundup at the Miami Book Fair, WLRN's Tom Hudson spoke with a panel of authors about the changing political and cultural landscape of South Florida.

National Book Award finalist and MacArthur finalist Edwidge Danticat, host of NPR's Full Disclosure Roben Farzad and Dr. Andrew Frank, professor of history at Florida State University took to the stage to discuss everything from uncertainty over immigration to the slow expansion of medical marijuana and the backlash against Confederate symbols scattered across the state. 

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Bruno Rebuffo heard the crane fall before he knew what it was.

“It sounded like an earthquake, honestly,” he said. “It was a big loud boom and you thought the roof is going to fall”

It's the end of an era in domestic commercial aviation Tuesday, as United Airlines flies the iconic Boeing 747 one last time.

The flight from San Francisco to Honolulu recreates the airline's first trip taken by the "Queen of the Skies" back in 1970, which helped usher in a golden age of commercial airline flight.

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Joe Skipper/Reuters 

One of the most chilling symbols of the Cold War has to be the black-and-yellow aluminum sign, indicating a nuclear fallout shelter.

The man responsible for the sign, Robert Blakeley, died on Oct. 25, at the age of 95.

The signs — long out of use — can still be found across the country at schools and other buildings designated as public shelters by the government, in the event of a Soviet nuclear strike.

Back in 1961, Blakeley was asked by the US Army Corps of Engineers to come up with a design for the new fallout shelter program.

As Jacksonville residents grapple with whether to remove the city’s Confederate monuments a group of area high school students are offering a more conciliatory alternative to the normally fractious debate among adults.


In 1940, on the eve of the United States' entrance into World War II, then-President Franklin D. Roosevelt's Immigration and Naturalization Service wanted to promote tolerance toward immigrants.

At that time, radio was the most important medium in the U.S. More than 80 percent of American households had a radio, and people listened for three or four hours every day. So, to reach the American people, the agency made a radio show.

Fossilized dinosaur feces are challenging some basic assumptions about dinosaur eating habits.

Hadrosaurs, a kind of duck-billed dinosaur, are among the most common herbivores of the Cretaceous period. But new research suggests that actually, these animals also chowed down on crustaceans. The prehistoric snacking was likely intentional and linked to mating behaviors.

The scientists found tell-tale crustacean shell pieces in samples of fossilized dinosaur feces about 75 million year old from the Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in southern Utah.

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Wiki Commons

Donald Trump loves the military. He claims "our military will soon be the strongest it has ever been." And now he’s touting an idea for celebrating the US armed forces: a massive military parade in Washington, for the Fourth of July, perhaps as soon as next year.

He was inspired by the Bastille Day parade he witnessed in Paris in July.

If you've seen the hit musical Hamilton — or even if you've only heard about it — you might want to know more about the founding father who was the United States' first Secretary of the Treasury. And if so, the Library of Congress just made it easier to go right to the source.

Sen. Lauren Book (D-Plantation) wants to roll back Florida’s confederate holiday observances.

As the debate rages over what role Confederate monuments do — and should — play in commemorating U.S. history, Jennifer Allen says we can learn a lot from Germany.

Allen is an assistant professor of German history at Yale University, and she specializes in something called memory politics.

Though the violence has ended in Charlottesville, Va., debates and protests continue and Confederate statues and monuments are being removed all over the country.

St. Pete Mayor Orders Removal Of Confederate Marker

Aug 16, 2017

The mayor of St. Petersburg has ordered the removal of a stone marker erected in 1939 to commemorate Confederate Gen. Stonewall Jackson.

In July of 1878, Vassar professor Maria Mitchell led a team of astronomers to the new state of Colorado to observe a total solar eclipse. In a field outside of Denver, they watched as the sun went dark and a feathery fan of bright tendrils — the solar corona — faded into view.

American doctors have been noticing an increase in osteoarthritis of the knee. They have suspected two driving forces: more old people and more people who are overweight.

A study published in this week's Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences argues that's far from the whole story. Even correcting for body mass index and age, osteoarthritis of the knee is twice as common now as it was before the 1950s.

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