Hillary Clinton

Trump, Clinton Head Back To Florida After Debate

4 hours ago

Get ready, Florida voters. You're about to see even more of Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

After Monday night's ballyhooed presidential debate, Trump and Clinton will quickly try to grab momentum in Florida. The Clinton campaign didn't wait for the debate to start, dispatching vice-presidential candidate Tim Kaine to the critical state ahead of time to try to lock down votes.

Associated Press

Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton went head-to-head during the first presidential debate on Monday night.

NPR's politics team, with help from reporters and editors who cover national security, immigration, business, foreign policy and more, were annotating the debate live.

The first presidential debate was a tense affair between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump as they clashed over their economic and trade plans, national security and race relations in the U.S.

The Republican nominee came out aggressively against Clinton, often interrupting her and talking over her, but the Democratic nominee didn't pull her punches either and had plenty of zingers ready. And as the night wore on, Trump appeared repeatedly rattled as he was pressed on his past support for the birther movement and controversial comments about women.

Do Debates Actually Change Voters' Minds?

Sep 26, 2016

As many as 100 million people are expected to tune in for tonight’s first presidential debate between Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton.

But what, if anything, will they take away from the event?

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd talks with Derek Thompson of The Atlantic about research into how much debates actually affect a voter’s choice of candidate.

Here’s a video of one presidential debate that some voters said did make a difference:

[Youtube]

The political endorsement song is a strange beast. It's something more than just a campaign anthem — the kind of track that pumps up rally audiences before a candidate's entrance onstage. Instead, this kind of tune is an odd hybrid: part commercial jingle, part aspirational anthem and, with nearly no exceptions, a soon-forgotten novelty. (One outlier: the sturdy Whig song "Tippecanoe and Tyler Too" from the 1840 presidential campaign, which was most recently resurrected by They Might Be Giants in 2004.)

The first presidential debate tonight is shaping up to be one of the most-watched political events ever, with a potentially Super Bowl-size audience.

Here are four things to watch for as Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump take the stage at Hofstra University on Long Island.

1. Which Trump shows up

Donald Trump "won" the primary debates by dominating his opponents, often by name-calling and bluster. This one will be different.

For nearly as long as she's been in the public eye, Hillary Clinton has counted the well-being of children among her defining causes — from the bestselling 1996 book (and enduring cliche) It Takes A Village to her advocacy for the State Child Health Insurance Program. This presidential campaign has been no exception, except if anything, she's been working even harder to draw connections between investments in education and economic growth. Here's a rundown of her positions from cradle to college.

For months now, Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump have been sparring at each other from afar. On Monday they'll do it face to face, on a stage at Hofstra University on Long Island in New York.

Debates have been a mainstay of presidential campaigns, it seems forever. But that's not quite the case: The first general election debate didn't occur until 1960, in a Chicago TV studio, between Vice President Richard M. Nixon and Senator John F. Kennedy.

Monday's debate between Clinton and Trump will take place on the 56th anniversary of that first debate.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump will be together on stage for the first time on Monday. Both candidates have a lot at stake when they meet at Hofstra University in New York for the first of three presidential debates, this one with moderator Lester Holt of NBC News.

Each has different opportunities and challenges in the debates. Here are four things Clinton will have to think about. We also looked at four things to watch for Trump.

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump have spent the summer throwing attacks at one another from across the country and over the Internet. But on Monday night, the two will stand face to face on a debate stage for the first time.

Researchers seeking to predict how Americans will vote have for years identified an important clue: The more religious you are, the more likely you are to lean Republican.

Conversations with more than two-dozen self-identified "faith" voters in Boone, N.C., suggest that pattern is holding this year, even while revealing the same high level of voter disenchantment evident across the country.

Walter Michot / Miami Herald

In 2012, Florida’s election results were decided by less than one percent. In 2000, fewer than 600 votes separated the candidates.

Today, Florida remains a swing state, with an especially high number of registered independents.

One in four registered voters in the state don’t declare any political party, making it the fastest growing political class in Florida.

So, who exactly are Florida's swing voters?

Hillary Clinton's begrudging release of information related to her health on Sunday follows a pattern set by candidates and many who have won the Oval Office.

It is a pattern of secrecy and, in some cases, cover-ups that would be scandalous if they occurred on other issues of policy.

Standing before a crowd of longtime Hillary Clinton fans, former Bernie Sanders supporters, and on-the-fence voters in Orlando’s predominantly black Richmond Heights neighborhood, former U.S. President Bill Clinton outlined Hillary’s plan to develop workers’ technical skills and boost modern manufacturing.

A new poll from Quinnipiac University shows Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are tied in Florida.

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