Hillary Clinton

Kyle Holsten / WLRN

One of Hillary Clinton’s messages was clear even before the candidate took the stage Tuesday in Coconut Creek.

‘Vote Early’ -- with a Florida orange for the ‘o’ -- hung above the risers behind the podium where the Democratic presidential candidate would speak.

“I feel good, but boy, I’m not taking anything for granted,” Clinton said, addressing an enthusiastic audience of about 1,750 people at Broward College North Campus. “[This election] it’s so important for Florida -- there are so many issues we need to draw attention to.”

In case you needed more evidence of the toll this divisive campaign is taking on America, a new survey says more than a third of social media users are "worn out" by the amount of political content they encounter.

Kate Stein / WLRN

On the first day of early voting in Miami-Dade County, about 200 people turned out to hear Democratic vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine campaign for Hillary Clinton.

Speaking on the lawn outside of the Graham University Center at Florida International University (FIU), Kaine tackled topics from Donald Trump’s campaign to immigration reform. He urged attendees to vote.

“We kind of like the polls right now... but I'm here to tell you this one thing: we can't take anything for granted," Kaine said.

AT&T's proposed $85.4 billion purchase of Time Warner is already raising eyebrows among an important constituency: politicians. Reaction to the deal, which was announced Saturday night, has been swift, and skeptical, from both sides of the aisle.

At a rally in Gettysburg, Pa., earlier Saturday, after news of the deal had started to trickle out, GOP presidential candidate Donald Trump said it was "a deal we will not approve in my administration because it's too much concentration of power in the hands of too few."

Make no mistake. Gloria Steinem, noted feminist and author, does not see that a woman elected to the White House automatically means a win for feminists or women.

"This is not all about biology, and I think we have to be careful to always say that, because if Sarah Palin were the president it wouldn't signify change," she tells NPR's Steve Inskeep. "If President Obama did not represent the majority views of Americans and of African-Americans, he would not represent change as he does. So it isn't about simple biology. It's about what we represent."

Kyle Holsten / WLRN

Strong rains were not enough to keep away a crowd of more than 2,800 people that gathered Thursday afternoon at Florida Memorial University's arena in Miami Gardens to participate in a rally with president Barack Obama. 

"Tolerance is on the ballot. Justice is on the ballot. Equality is on the ballot. Our democracy is on the ballot," said Obama, who in several instances of his speech reiterated to the crowd the need to vote in this election. "Don't believe your vote doesn't matter, that all politicians are the same. They want you to stay home, to not vote."

The final presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump was overall more cordial and more policy-focused than their nasty second debate faceoff. But the stunning moment that will stand out is the GOP nominee's statement that he won't necessarily accept the results of the election on Nov. 8.

"I will tell you at the time," Trump said in a shocking statement that signals a break from the traditional transfer of power. "I will keep you in suspense."

9 p.m. ET (We know you were wondering).

Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump debate Wednesday night for the last time before Election Day in Las Vegas.

Here's what else you need to know to get caught up ahead of the third and final debate:

Hillary Clinton is far outpacing Donald Trump by historic margins among likely Miami-Dade County voters, according to a new WLRN/Univision 23 poll released today.

A new WLRN/Univision 23 survey finds Hillary Clinton is viewed better among registered Miami-Dade County voters than she is nationwide and Donald Trump's efforts to appeal to black voters has fallen flat. It also shows Hispanic voters are divided regarding Clinton, but not regarding Trump.


Here are the results of the survey for president conducted in English and Spanish of 600 Miami-Dade County registered voters.

The final presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump is on Wednesday at 9 p.m. ET. It's the last chance either candidate will have to make a closing argument before tens of millions of voters.

It follows yet another unprecedented week in the campaign, in which Trump has repeatedly questioned the legitimacy of the election, predicting that it will be stolen from him through media bias and massive voter fraud.

If presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump were consumer products, they wouldn't exactly be flying off the shelves, according to a firm that studies brand loyalty.

The Reputation Institute, which gauges how consumers view companies, politicians and even countries, gives Republican nominee Trump what it calls an overall "pulse score" of 31.7. Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton rates a bit better, at 38.7.

Any score less than 40 qualifies as having a "poor reputation," the firm says.

Democratic vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine spoke to a church group in Miami over the weekend.

That wouldn't be remarkable except that he spoke entirely in Spanish — a first for a candidate on a major-party ticket.

"Yo soy cristiano, un católico" ("I'm a Christian, a Catholic") Kaine told parishioners at Pneuma Church at the beginning of his five-minute speech.

Kaine described his background working as a missionary in Honduras, where he said he learned lessons about faith, family and hard work.

If you thought Congress was done probing Hillary Clinton's email scandal, Rep. Jason Chaffetz, of Utah, has some news for you.

The Republican chair of the House Oversight committee told Fox News that new evidence turned over by the FBI pointed to a "quid pro quo" arrangement between the FBI and the State Department and that was grounds for at least "four new hearings" after Congress comes back from recess.

Katie Lepri / WLRN

Little blue and white circular H stickers peppered people's shirts as they stood in front of fields of black muck waiting for  President Bill Clinton's voter registration rally to start in Belle Glade Tuesday afternoon. 

The former president celebrated his 41st wedding anniversary making a case for his wife's education and infrastructure plans in western Palm Beach County. 

"The federal court in Tallahassee gave us an extra day of registration," he said. "Take advantage of it."