health

In the 1960s, the sugar industry funded research that downplayed the risks of sugar and highlighted the hazards of fat, according to a newly published article in JAMA Internal Medicine.

It has been four months since WLRN launched Pricecheck, an online guide to bring clarity to health care costs in Florida. Along with our partners WUSF in Tampa and Health News Florida and with input from our audience, we created a searchable database of prices of common health care procedures and supplies aiming to answer a single question: "How much does it cost?"

Jessica Stefonik is grinning. She's got a bounce in her step. Her cheeks are a little puffy and her speech is a bit thick.

"It feels weird right now, but I'll get used to it," she says.

What she's trying to get used to is the feeling of having teeth.

On the day we met, Stefonik, a mom of three from Mosinee, Wis., got a set of dentures to replace all of her upper teeth, which she lost over many years to disease and decay.

Stefonik is just 31 years old.

Most of the world didn't know anyone lived in the highlands of Papua New Guinea until the 1930s, when Australian gold prospectors surveying the area realized there were about a million people there.

When researchers made their way to those villages in the 1950s, they found something disturbing. Among a tribe of about 11,000 people called the Fore, up to 200 people a year had been dying of an inexplicable illness. They called the disease kuru, which means "shivering" or "trembling."

It really hit Terry White eight years ago when he was at the mall with his wife. He was out of breath every few minutes and had to sit down. "My wife told me I had to get to the gym and lose weight," he says.

He had dieted most of his life. "I've probably lost 1,000 pounds over the years," says White, a realtor in North Myrtle Beach, N.C. But he put most of it back on.

For engineer Matt Bellina, of Cocoa Beach, Fla., riding the perfect wave was a group mission.

More than 15 friends gathered on Florida's Cocoa Beach on a Saturday morning this summer. Their task? Get 40-year-old Bellina back into the water surfing.

Doctors describe 16-year-old Sebastian DeLeon as a walking miracle – he’s only the fourth person in the U.S. to survive an infection from the so-called brain-eating amoeba in the U.S.

Miami Herald

 According to the Governor’s office, five cases of the Zika virus have been identified in Miami Beach. This as the tally of locally transmitted cases hits 36. So, what's new in the effort to find and stop it?

Also, from the U.S. Senate to county hall, early voting has begun for the August 30th primaries. A third party presidential candidate comes to town. And how truthful is this political season?

As local cases of Zika virus continue to increase, this  week The Florida Roundup dedicated its full hour to an analysis of the political and economic dimensions of the outbreak of this virus in South Florida.

A square mile of Miami is now the hot zone for Zika and the threat of the virus-carrying mosquitoes. Pregnant women are warned about the neighborhood as aerial spraying begins. Where are the bugs? How big of a threat is Zika? And to whom?

Listen here: 

FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Local transmission of Zika by mosquitoes has been confirmed in Miami-Dade and Broward County. What does this mean for South Florida residents?

The Environmental Regulation Commission recently voted for new standards for more than 80 different toxic chemicals, some of them carcinogens, and just how much of each we’re going to allow in our water supply. Environmental groups claim we are putting Floridian’s health in danger. We’ll take a closer look at exactly what it is we’re putting in our water.

Listen Below:

Whatever South Korean women are eating, pass it around!

The country is having a massive growth spurt. And it doesn't look like it's slowing down anytime soon.

Women in South Korea have gained a whopping 8 inches in height, on average, in the past century — the biggest jump of any other population in the world, researchers report Tuesday.

For men, Iranians are the big winners, gaining 6.5 inches in the past hundred years.

Walker Dawson huddles up a group of friends around Matt Bellina’s wheelchair on Cocoa Beach. The plan is to paddle out a little further south, where the sandbar is more crumbly.

C. DiMattei

First, ergonomic chairs were a must-have when it came to workplace wellness. Then, standing desks were all the rage.

Could “walking meetings” follow?

A new University of Miami study suggests that swapping out a seated meeting just once a week for what TV screenwriters call “the walk and talk” could be a boon to worker health and well-being.

Over a three-week period, study participants -- white-collar workers -- wore accelerometers to measure their physical activity.

Herbalife has agreed to pay $200 million to reimburse consumers who lost money on its nutrition supplements and will also make major changes in its sales and distribution practices, the Federal Trade Commission announced today.

The FTC filed a complaint accusing the company of deceiving consumers about how much money they could make selling its products, noting that most Herbalife distributors make no money at all.

A quick consultation with Dr. Google will tell you that drinking lots of water — and staying well-hydrated — can help you lose weight.

But is there any truth to this? A new study published in the Annals of Family Medicine adds to the evidence that hydration may play a role in weight management.

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