health care

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  TALLAHASSEE -- State House Republicans emerged from a closed-door meeting on Tuesday apparently still resolved to oppose expanding Medicaid for 800,000 low-income Floridians.

Meanwhile, the Senate, in an unusual workshop session to hash out the Medicaid problem and its implications for Florida's hospitals and its economy, was hearing from the state's chief economist that the House position threatens an economic catastrophe that begins with Florida's safety net hospitals.

Wilson Sayre

This is the second part in our series, Falling Into The Gap, in collaboration with the Miami Herald. Read more about the coverage gap and find affordable care on WLRN.org/healthgap.

Before the pain in her arms started, Cynthia Louis would get up each morning, sit on the edge of her bed and fix her shoulder-length hair. In the mirror above her dressing table where her hair products and pins are neatly aligned, she would brush out her curled hair to frame her face.

Miami Herald

Thousands of South Floridians too poor to afford health insurance on their own are going without.

These people end up in what is called the "coverage gap" because they earn too little to get help buying health insurance under Obamacare, but they don’t qualify for Medicaid.

'Young Invincibles' Demand Medicaid

Apr 16, 2015
401(K) 2012 / Flickr/Creative Commons

  The "Young Invincibles" is an ironic demographic designation for young people who think they will never get sick, will never buy health insurance and will therefore bring down Obamacare.

But Cristina Calvillo-Rivera, representing the actual Young Invincibles organization, says Florida's 300,000 people of ages 18 through 34 do want care, are less likely to get it, and more likely to have medical debt.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald news you heard:

 

It was 1964. The New York World's Fair.

And a young Tony Napolitano saw his first video phone at the Bell Telephone pavilion. The boy marveled that people could connect visually from remote locations.

Fast forward to 2015. Napolitano, now a pediatric neonatologist, is about to make this connection an ordinary part of practicing medicine at All Children’s Hospital in St. Petersburg.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

Gort Productions

The Florida Legislature is debating on whether to expand Medicaid. About two weeks ago, the Senate overwhelmingly approved a bill that would expand health care coverage to about 800,000 low-income Floridians using billions in federal dollars.

And the U.S. Centers For Medicare and Medicaid Services would have to grant the state a waiver to get the federal funds.

freedigitalphotos.net

The University of Miami School of Business hosted its yearly health care conference Monday. The main topic of discussion was “disruptive innovation,” which organizer and professor Steven Ullmann says means "to disrupt how we do health care provision in this country."

Ullmann says the health care system now is fragmented, and that makes it expensive.

Health Plan for Legal Immigrant Kids Stalled

Mar 20, 2015

A bill that would extend low-cost KidCare health insurance to roughly 25,000 children of legal immigrants has gotten further in the Florida Senate than ever before, but remains stalled in the House.

Millions of runners are searching for a new challenge. They want something with more danger and fun than a traditional marathon event.

  Woman seeking abortions would have to wait 24 hours under a bill now advancing in the Florida Legislature.

A House committee on Thursday approved the bill after hearing passionate testimony.

The measure sponsored by Rep. Jennifer Sullivan would require a woman seeking an abortion to talk in person to the physician performing the abortion at least 24 hours ahead of time.

Sullivan said she was sponsoring the bill (HB 633) to make sure women were not rushed into seeking an abortion.

  Delays continue for the rules on the state's legalized low-THC marijuana extract known as "Charlotte's Web," the Orlando Sentine

Scott Drops Welfare Drug Testing Challenge

Mar 5, 2015

After spending at least $300,000 of taxpayer money on legal expenses, Gov. Rick Scott is abandoning his fight to force welfare applicants to undergo mandatory drug tests.

A federal appeals court ruled in December that the state’s mandatory, suspicion-less drug testing of applicants in the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families, or TANF, program is an unconstitutional violation of Fourth Amendment protections against unreasonable searches and seizures by the government.

Matthew Robinson loved to have eggs for dinner.
 
But they were out the evening of November 4, 2010. So the 10-year-old and his brother Mark walked out of their Kissimmee apartment and headed across the street to the Kangaroo convenience store.
 

While crossing the street to come home, a city bus made a left turn into the crosswalk and hit the two boys.

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