health care

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This week on the Florida Roundup, we're exploring why subsidies to help nearly a million Floridians buy health insurance are on shaky ground.

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Some Obamacare insurance subsidies were struck down by one court but upheld by another during a tumultuous day for the Affordable Care Act. One of the rulings is a direct threat to the tax credits that have recently helped thousands of Floridians buy health insurance.

Community Health of South Florida

Community of Health of South Florida received a $2 million grant to train primary physicians. The center is the first in the state to receive funding from the Health Resource and Services Administration.  

Thirteen medical residents started a training program this month to meet the needs of many patients newly insured under the Affordable Care Act.

Creative Commons of Charles Bell's Anatomy of the Brain, c. 1802 / Flickr user Shaheen Lakhan

  This month, Florida became the first state to offer a Medicaid plan dedicated to people who are diagnosed with severe mental health disorders.

It’s part of a larger move by the state’s Medicaid officials to move coverage towards a managed care system. It means one organization takes care of and coordinates all of a person’s health care needs: no more separate dental, vision, and internal medicine plans.

Mental health issues are almost twice as prevalent among Medicaid recipients than in the general population.

 Close to 50 Florida hospitals have successfully reined in a practice that can cause big problems: Deliberately delivering an infant before the completion of the 39th week of pregnancy.

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists and the March of Dimes are giving a banner of recognition that says "Healthy Babies Are Worth the Wait" to each hospital that meet the criteria, according to a news release from March of Dimes. 

Miami Herald

The Health Rights Clinic in the University of Miami’s School of Law offers free legal services to veterans. They help those who've been denied benefits they may be entitled to, like Social Security.

Ryan Foley, a pro bono attorney for the clinic, says the most common reason veterans are denied is that they have not been able to provide enough evidence to support their claims.

“That is why lawyers are so important to getting veterans the benefits they deserve,” says Foley.

Today on WLRN-Miami Herald News, you heard:

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A group of Florida doctors has been charging Medicare at a surprisingly high rate.

A ProPublica investigation analyzed a recently released Medicare database and found unusual billing patterns in Florida and elsewhere. ProPublica used that same data to create an online tool that lets patients see how individual doctors compare to their peers when it comes to procedures and billing patterns.

Florida Docs Charge Medicare Top Rate For Office Visits

May 15, 2014
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Office visits are the bread and butter of many physicians’ practices. Medicare pays for more than 200 million of them a year, often to deal with routine problems like colds or high blood pressure. Most require relatively modest amounts of a doctor’s time or medical know-how.

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Rules to govern the so-called "sober houses" that proliferate in Palm Beach and Broward counties have survived one gauntlet of committees in the Legislature and they're ready for a full House vote.

The bill aims to protect the sober houses' complaining neighbors as well as the recovering addicts themselves. Listen to the full story below.

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