health care

Miami International Airport Workers Voting To Strike

Dec 12, 2014
Jessica Meszaros / WLRN

  Miami International Airport restaurant workers have been without a contract for about seven months. They want higher pay and better health care benefits.

Over 50 people rallied in front of Terminal E Departures at the airport Friday. They gathered HMS Host employee signatures from 7 a.m to 8 p.m.

Christian Ward lounges on a couch in the University of South Florida student center in Tampa. He props crutches against the armrest and stretches out his leg, which is covered in a cast up to his thigh.

Like a lot of college students, Ward’s parents handle his health insurance. He'll tell you that having it definitely came in handy during his moment of need.

Does this sound like a top health care CEO?

Or this?

Those are the comments of Baptist Health South Florida CEO Brian Keeley. Baptist Health is the largest faith-based non-profit health system in South Florida. It delivers $2 billion of health care to South Florida through seven hospitals, more than a dozen urgent care centers and various other specialty health centers. The Baptist business has more than 1,700 beds and serves more than 1 million patients per year. Keeley has been with Baptist for more than 30 years.

Tomorrow it begins again – open enrollment for Obamacare. Two very successful state health insurance exchanges, Connecticut's and California's, are both intent on reaching people who avoided signing up last year – especially young Latinos and African-Americans.

Translating from one language to another is a tricky business, and when it comes to interpreting between a doctor and patient, the stakes are even higher.

Consider the story of 18-year-old baseball player Willie Ramirez.

Entopsis / Courtesy

The next stage of smartphone evolution, portable disease diagnostics, is headquartered on the edge of Overtown and Allapattah.

A Cuban-American doctor has brought his lab to the University of Miami’s Life Science and Technology Park where he’s developing a proprietary apparatus on the cutting edge of nanotechnology.

Veterans Secretary Wants VA Whistleblowers

Oct 6, 2014

Secret patient waiting lists, delayed medical care, retaliation against whistleblowers  are all reasons why trust in the VA hit an all-time low this spring especially on Capitol Hill.

The new Secretary of Veterans Affairs, Robert “Bob” McDonald is trying to restore that trust. He’s started by visiting as many VA facilities as possible during his first 90 days in office.

McDonald toured several Florida VA facilities this week and he invited U.S. Rep. Jeff Miller, Chairman of the House Committee of Veterans Affairs, to come along.

An FIU Doctor's Experience With The Ebola Outbreak

Oct 2, 2014
FIU Wertheim College of Medicine

It wasn’t Dr. Aileen Marty’s first trip to West Africa and it likely won’t be her last.

The Florida International University professor of infectious disease is on the World Health Organization’s go-to list to head anywhere, anytime whenever an illness becomes an epidemic threat.

The disease this time? The Ebola virus.

The place? Nigeria.

Kevin Wiehrs is a nurse in Savannah, Ga. But instead of giving patients shots or taking blood pressure readings, his job is mostly talking with patients like Susan Johnson.

Johnson, 63, is a retired restaurant cook who receives Medicare and Medicaid. She has diabetes, and has already met with her doctor. Afterward, Wiehrs spends another half-hour with Johnson, talking through her medication, exercise and diet.

Three times in one week, 34-year-old Michael Granillo returned to the emergency room of the Northridge Hospital Medical Center in Southern California, seeking relief from intense back pain. Each time, Granillo waited a little while and then left the ER without ever being seen by a doctor.

"I was in so much pain, I wanted to be taken care of 'now,' " says Granillo. "I didn't want to sit and wait."

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