health care

Americans really, really don't like the Senate bill to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act.

Holly Pretsky / WLRN

As the uncertainty around the U.S. Senate health care bill continues, about 40 people gathered at the South Florida AFL-CIO Union Hall in Miami Springs on Saturday to demand that Senator Marco Rubio vote against it. 

Organizers called the event an "Empty Chair Town Hall" to highlight that Senator Rubio wasn't there to hear from constituents in person. 

According to the organizers, one of the senator's representatives sent an email expressing Rubio's regrets that he couldn't attend due to other engagements. 

This week, as senators have decamped from Washington for the Fourth of July recess, the future of the Senate's Affordable Care Act replacement plan — and by extension, Medicaid — remains uncertain.

Orlando Trial Lawyer Challenges Medical Marijuana Smoking Ban

Jul 7, 2017
Brendan Farrington / AP

Saying Floridians knew what they were voting on in November, Orlando trial lawyer John Morgan on Thursday followed through on threats to sue the state over a smoking ban included in a new law carrying out a constitutional amendment that broadly legalized medical marijuana.

Morgan, who largely bankrolled the medical-marijuana ballot initiative, had repeatedly threatened to launch a legal challenge over smoking, which he maintains was permitted in the amendment supported by more than 71 percent of Florida voters last fall.

Daylina Miller / Health News Florida

Thousands of Floridians living with AIDS could be losing financial assistance they say is essential to living a normal life, and some AIDS groups are worried the state won't carry through on its promises.

Drop In Sudden Cardiac Arrests Linked To Obamacare

Jun 29, 2017

If 22 million Americans lose their health care coverage by 2026 under the GOP Senate’s plan to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, how many people could die? The question is at the heart of the debate raging in Washington, D.C., but has been difficult to answer.

Adrianne Gonzalez / WLRN News

Helena Pivarnik believes she’s alive today only because of the health care coverage she got through the Affordable Care Act. She’s a cancer survivor. Without coverage, she couldn’t afford chemotherapy. 

It’s one of the reasons she’s one of approximately 50 South Florida residents who were protesting outside U.S. Sen. Marco Rubio’s office in Doral under the blazing sun on Wednesday. Rubio is one of 50 votes needed to pass the Senate’s Better Care Reconciliation Act, the GOP’s answer to 'repeal and replace’ the Affordable Care Act.

BOB SELF / AP VIA MIAMI HERALD

Florida Gov. Rick Scott on Tuesday immersed himself again into the political fray over health care as he went to Washington, D.C., to ask top Republicans to make key changes to a proposed Senate bill to overhaul the Affordable Care Act.

Scott's move, which included a meeting with Vice President Mike Pence as well as Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, came at the same time that Senate leaders postponed a vote amid defections from GOP senators.

Updated at 1:35 p.m. ET

Americans broadly disapprove of the Senate GOP's health care bill, and they're unhappy with how Republicans are handling the efforts to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, according to a new NPR/PBS NewsHour/Marist poll.

Updated 2:30 p.m. ET

Facing a perilous path for their health care bill, Senate Republican leaders have decided to push off a vote on their health care bill until after Congress returns from next week's July Fourth recess, GOP aides confirm to NPR's Susan Davis. The delay comes on a day in which President Trump was working to twist some arms and when several GOP senators were saying they were against bringing the bill to the floor this week.

Medicaid is the government health care program for the poor.

That's the shorthand explanation. But Medicaid is so much more than that — which is why it has become the focal point of the battle in Washington to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

This week on The Florida Roundup ...

After weeks of private negotiations, Senate Republicans unveiled their Better Care Reconciliation Act, their proposal to replace the Affordable Care Act. Florida has more at stake in this debate than any other state and South Florida alone has more than 600,000 people signed up for individual coverage through the ACA this year. 

Updated at 2:32 p.m. ET

Senate Republicans unveiled their long-awaited health care overhaul proposal on Thursday. The Senate bill, called the "Better Care Reconciliation Act," would repeal major parts of the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. The broad outlines of it look a lot like the House bill, the American Health Care Act, which was passed in May.

The Republican effort to overhaul the Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, has led to a standoff in the Senate.

Senate Democrats on Monday night began using parliamentary maneuvers to slow Senate business as part of a coordinated protest against the GOP push to pass an Obamacare replacement bill. A small group of Republican senators has been working in private for weeks, shielding from public view the bill and the negotiations surrounding it.

The AARP has been outspoken in its opposition to the American Health Care Act, which was passed by the House earlier this month.

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