health

FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH

Local transmission of Zika by mosquitoes has been confirmed in Miami-Dade and Broward County. What does this mean for South Florida residents?

The Environmental Regulation Commission recently voted for new standards for more than 80 different toxic chemicals, some of them carcinogens, and just how much of each we’re going to allow in our water supply. Environmental groups claim we are putting Floridian’s health in danger. We’ll take a closer look at exactly what it is we’re putting in our water.

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Whatever South Korean women are eating, pass it around!

The country is having a massive growth spurt. And it doesn't look like it's slowing down anytime soon.

Women in South Korea have gained a whopping 8 inches in height, on average, in the past century — the biggest jump of any other population in the world, researchers report Tuesday.

For men, Iranians are the big winners, gaining 6.5 inches in the past hundred years.

Walker Dawson huddles up a group of friends around Matt Bellina’s wheelchair on Cocoa Beach. The plan is to paddle out a little further south, where the sandbar is more crumbly.

C. DiMattei

First, ergonomic chairs were a must-have when it came to workplace wellness. Then, standing desks were all the rage.

Could “walking meetings” follow?

A new University of Miami study suggests that swapping out a seated meeting just once a week for what TV screenwriters call “the walk and talk” could be a boon to worker health and well-being.

Over a three-week period, study participants -- white-collar workers -- wore accelerometers to measure their physical activity.

Herbalife has agreed to pay $200 million to reimburse consumers who lost money on its nutrition supplements and will also make major changes in its sales and distribution practices, the Federal Trade Commission announced today.

The FTC filed a complaint accusing the company of deceiving consumers about how much money they could make selling its products, noting that most Herbalife distributors make no money at all.

A quick consultation with Dr. Google will tell you that drinking lots of water — and staying well-hydrated — can help you lose weight.

But is there any truth to this? A new study published in the Annals of Family Medicine adds to the evidence that hydration may play a role in weight management.

Nadege Green / WLRN

This story originally ran on September 22, 2015

I was born and raised in Miami, but my very Haitian mom always kept true to her roots — especially whenever I didn’t feel well.

Have a sore throat? Sour orange leaves can fix that.  A tummy ache? Freshly picked mint from the backyard will ease the pain.

She is a believer of remed fey, or bush medicine.

My mom comes from a line of Haitian women herbalists from Gonaives, Haiti.  She learned from her mother, who learned from her mother, who learned from her mother and so on.

Baptist Health

A machine that blasts beams to fight evil cancer cells may sound more like a comic book and less of a reality.

But last week, Baptist Hospital in Kendall began installing this new medical equipment to provide an alternative to X-ray radiation for cancer patients.  

The 220-ton machine is known as  a cyclotron, but Baptist Hospital calls its newest addition “Proton Pete.” 

Bright, energy-efficient LED streetlamps can be bad for our health, according to the American Medical Association.

Specifically, high-intensity LEDs that release mostly blue light — as opposed to the "warmer-looking" light of older streetlamps — create glare and mess with sleep cycles, the organization says.

Amanda Rabines / WLRN

Nearly one hundred south Florida residents gathered to hear medical specialists talk about precautions families should take to protect pregnant women and their unborn children from contracting the Zika virus. 

The talk, called "Zika and Pregnancy: What You Need to Know Now," was organized by Baptist Health Resource Center in their Kendall location last Wednesday. 

Florida Stores Help Consumers Buy Imported Drugs Despite Federal Ban

Jun 7, 2016

A hardy market for imported low-cost prescription drugs has taken root in Florida, nourished by older Americans and tolerant regulators.

Men who live near the Daytona International Speedway  have higher death rates than state averages, according to an analysis of health statistics from the Florida Department of Health.

Colon cancer rates are 10 times higher than the state average in the area code surrounding the speedway, and stroke rates are almost 13 times higher.

Public health advocates who are exasperated by the fight on Capitol Hill over how much to spend to combat the Zika virus are looking longingly at the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

FEMA has a standing fund that it can draw upon when disaster strikes. The fund is replenished when the money is spent cleaning up from hurricanes, tornadoes and other natural disasters.

Concussions have become part of the daily news. But how much have these brain injuries become part of daily life?

To find out, we asked people across the country about concussions in the latest NPR-Truven Health Analytics Health Poll.

The poll, conducted during the first half of March, found that nearly a quarter of people — 23 percent of those surveyed — said they had suffered a concussion at some point in their lives. Among those who said they'd had a concussion, more than three-quarters had sought medical treatment.

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