health

Baptist Health

A machine that blasts beams to fight evil cancer cells may sound more like a comic book and less of a reality.

But last week, Baptist Hospital in Kendall began installing this new medical equipment to provide an alternative to X-ray radiation for cancer patients.  

The 220-ton machine is known as  a cyclotron, but Baptist Hospital calls its newest addition “Proton Pete.” 

Bright, energy-efficient LED streetlamps can be bad for our health, according to the American Medical Association.

Specifically, high-intensity LEDs that release mostly blue light — as opposed to the "warmer-looking" light of older streetlamps — create glare and mess with sleep cycles, the organization says.

Amanda Rabines / WLRN

Nearly one hundred south Florida residents gathered to hear medical specialists talk about precautions families should take to protect pregnant women and their unborn children from contracting the Zika virus. 

The talk, called "Zika and Pregnancy: What You Need to Know Now," was organized by Baptist Health Resource Center in their Kendall location last Wednesday. 

Florida Stores Help Consumers Buy Imported Drugs Despite Federal Ban

Jun 7, 2016

A hardy market for imported low-cost prescription drugs has taken root in Florida, nourished by older Americans and tolerant regulators.

Men who live near the Daytona International Speedway  have higher death rates than state averages, according to an analysis of health statistics from the Florida Department of Health.

Colon cancer rates are 10 times higher than the state average in the area code surrounding the speedway, and stroke rates are almost 13 times higher.

Public health advocates who are exasperated by the fight on Capitol Hill over how much to spend to combat the Zika virus are looking longingly at the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

FEMA has a standing fund that it can draw upon when disaster strikes. The fund is replenished when the money is spent cleaning up from hurricanes, tornadoes and other natural disasters.

Concussions have become part of the daily news. But how much have these brain injuries become part of daily life?

To find out, we asked people across the country about concussions in the latest NPR-Truven Health Analytics Health Poll.

The poll, conducted during the first half of March, found that nearly a quarter of people — 23 percent of those surveyed — said they had suffered a concussion at some point in their lives. Among those who said they'd had a concussion, more than three-quarters had sought medical treatment.

Updated at 7:50 p.m. ET.*

Dr. Henry Heimlich didn't hesitate. When a fellow diner started choking, the 96-year-old was ready to perform the maneuver that he invented.

A germ that can't be treated with an antibiotic that is often used as the last resort has shown up for the first time in the United States.

Government scientists say the case is cause for serious concern but doesn't pose any immediate public health threat.

The germ was discovered in a 49-year-old woman in Pennsylvania with a urinary tract infection. The infection was caused by E. coli bacteria that had a gene that made them resistant to an antibiotic known as colistin.

Over 150 pregnant women in the United States appear to have been infected with Zika virus. That's in addition to more than 120 women affected by Zika in U.S. territories, mainly Puerto Rico.

Those are the latest figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, which has been keeping track of all pregnant women in the U.S. and its territories who have lab tests suggestive of Zika virus infections.

While Congress fidgets over whether and how to pay for the fight against the Zika virus, state and local health departments are scrambling and slimming down.

That's because these front-line public health agencies have already seen their budgets chopped because of the debate.

DAYLINA MILLER/HEALTH NEWS FLORIDA

Some Tampa Bay area residents who like to dress up like their favorite comic book and movie characters are stepping into a new role. These cosplayers are volunteering their time to brighten the lives of children dealing with serious medical issues.

An autistic man’s family who says Disney’s new disability access program discriminates against guests with autism are continuing their legal fight.

David Carlucci via Twitter

A Florida-based medical staffing company must pay a fine of more than $100,000 for posting an ad in New York that specified “no Haitians ” should apply.

Interim Healthcare, which has its corporate office in Sunrise, offers healthcare services across the country through 300 different franchises. 

The ad appeared in a local Pennysaver in Rockland County, New York.

New York Attorney General Eric Schneidman investigated the ad posting and found the discriminatory language was a violation of civil rights laws.

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