health

Two years ago, when the Zika virus was first identified as the cause of microcephaly in babies, women were scared. Expectant mothers who got infected had no idea what the chances were of having a healthy baby.

Researchers have since learned that while Zika infection is dangerous, about 94 percent of babies born to women infected with Zika appear to be normal at birth.

courtesy University of Miami

Time is one of the biggest factors in treating strokes — and a group of South Florida researchers say they’ve found a way to buy stroke patients more time.

If a person has a stroke, the sooner they get treatment, the better their odds are of surviving and of healing without permanent disability. Generally, the thinking has been that patients have a window of no more than six hours for a clot-removal surgery to be effective.

But people don’t always know when they’ve had a stroke — like if it happens while they’re sleeping. And that complicates treatment options. 

Juan Flores and his family live in Galena Park, Texas, which is bordered on three sides by pipeline terminals, oil refineries, fertilizer plants and rail yards.

Flores has lived in the town of about 11,000 people just east of downtown Houston since he was 4 years old. For a while, he even served on the City Council.

When it comes to brain training, some workouts seem to work better than others.

A comparison of the two most common training methods scientists use to improve memory and attention found that one was twice as effective as the other. The more effective method also changed brain activity in a part of the brain involved in high-level thinking.

As someone who lives with obsessive-compulsive disorder, novelist John Green sometimes feels like his mind is spiraling uncontrollably.

"It starts out with one little thought, and then slowly that becomes the only thought that you're able to have," Green says. "It's like there's an invasive weed that just spreads out of control."

The National Sleep Foundation recommends an average of eight hours of sleep per night for adults, but sleep scientist Matthew Walker says that too many people are falling short of the mark.

"Human beings are the only species that deliberately deprive themselves of sleep for no apparent gain," Walker says. "Many people walk through their lives in an underslept state, not realizing it."

Every year about 130,000 people in the U.S. are hospitalized with a foodborne illness, and 3,000 people die.

To protect against this, the Food and Drug Administration inspects facilities that produce and handle food to ensure safety and compliance with regulations.

But a new report from the Department of Health and Human Services' Office of Inspector General raises some red flags about the inspections program.

More than one-quarter of serious cases of nursing home abuse are not reported to the police, according to an alert released Monday morning by the Office of Inspector General in the Department of Health and Human Services.

Miami Herald/El Nuevo Herlad

The FDA has issued an advisory and recall for all liquid drug products made at Davie-based drug company PharmaTech. This is the second recall in the last 10 months, including products widely used by infants and toddlers.

The first contamination advisory was issued after Burkholderia cepaci was found in the drug company's water system. B. cepacia,  a bacteria known to cause pneumonia in people with weakened immune systems and cystic fibrosis, among other diseases, has potentially serious effects. The contaminated water was used during the manufacturing of each liquid medication.

America is losing the battle against sexually transmitted infections. Cases of chlamydia, gonorrhea and syphilis all hit record-high numbers in 2015. Tens of thousands contract HIV every year in the U.S., and oral cancers caused by human papillomavirus are increasing.

So startups are popping up online to help serve what they see as unmet demand for STD testing. One advertises that you can "get a sexy deal" by ordering.

The key to stopping HIV could someday be a vaginal ring or a needle in the arm

Aug 9, 2017

Ziyanda Kamte says she knew her husband was cheating on her.

And she knew a lot about the HIV epidemic — her aunt died of AIDS-related tuberculosis. So, when her husband demanded sex, Kamte demanded that he use condoms.

“There were times when he would beat me up just for asking for a condom,” explains Kamte. “Because I said no. I refused. I was trying to protect myself. But he didn’t see it that way.”

Here’s the question that’s stumping health workers and activists: If more than 7 million HIV infections nationwide won’t convince a man to wear a condom, what will?  

I admit it. I have a "mummy tummy," also known as "mommy pooch." You know, that soft jelly belly you retain after having a baby — it makes you look a few months pregnant.

I've tried to convince myself that the pooch is a valiant badge of motherhood, but who am I kidding? The pooch bothers me. And it turns out it has been causing back pain.

So when I hear that a fitness coach and doctor have come up with a technique that can flatten the pooch quickly and easily, I think, "Why not?"

When appendicitis struck a young mother vacationing in St. Pete Beach eight years ago, she was rushed to Palms of Pasadena Hospital. There, Dr. Ernest Rehnke removed her appendix.

As the country starts to get back into its most popular professional team sport, there is a reminder of how dangerous football can be.

An updated study published Tuesday by the Journal of the American Medical Association on football players and the degenerative brain disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy reveals a striking result among NFL players.

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