Haiti

Ruth Morris

Books & Books bookstore owner Mitchell Kaplan speaks with award-winning author Edwidge Danticat about her experience as an Haitian immigrant living in Brooklyn, what it’s like to live in Miami now, and about writing the memoir

After a devastating earthquake hit Haiti in 2010, governments and foundations from around the world pledged more than $9 billion to help get the country back on its feet.

Only a fraction of the money ever made it. And Haiti's President Michel Martelly says the funds aren't "showing results."

Three years after the devastating Port-au-Prince earthquake, one of the largest international relief projects in Haiti isn't anywhere near where the quake hit. It's an industrial park on the north coast halfway between Cap-Haitien and the border with the Dominican Republic.

Aid agencies are pouring millions of dollars into the project to encourage people to move out of the overcrowded capital and create jobs. Critics, however, say the jobs don't pay enough to lift people out of poverty.

Not quite 10 months after Haiti's devastating 2010 earthquake, a more insidious disaster struck: cholera.

Haiti hadn't seen cholera for at least a century. Then suddenly, the first cases appeared in the central highlands near a camp for United Nations peacekeeping forces.

Saturday marks the third anniversary of the powerful earthquake that destroyed much of the Haitian capital, Port-au-Prince. The quake killed roughly 200,000 people and left 1.5 million Haitians homeless.

Despite billions of dollars in international aid and pledges to help Haiti rebuild from the disaster, very little new, permanent housing has been built. And about 350,000 Haitians are still living in squalid, makeshift camps — where they face an array of health challenges.

waterdotorg

On The Florida Roundup:  Saturday marks the third anniversary of the earthquake in Haiti.  How has it affected us in South Florida, home to the nation’s largest Haitian diaspora?   We take your calls on what you have seen in Haiti and what responsibility we have to this country less than 700 miles away.   Why has development been so slow after so many promises?

Nick Kozak

All week long we've been bringing you the story of Fabienne Jean, a dancer who lost her leg in the earthquake in Haiti three years ago this month. 

A prosthetic technician from Boston heard her story and fitted Fabienne with a fake leg. He tried to help Fabienne recover in other ways too. He hatched plans to help her start her business, buy a house and open a dance studio to raise money for Haitian amputees. 

But as reporter Jacob Kushner discovered, Fabienne's recovery has been a slow, frustrating process. 

http://duboisl2.wordpress.com/

01/08/13 - Tuesday's Topical Currents is with historian Laurent Dubois, author of HAITI:  The Aftershocks of History.  Even before the 2010 earthquake destroyed much of the country, Haiti was known for its poverty and corruption.  Dubois says Haiti can only be understood by its complex past and inception as the only successful slave revolt in world history.  Can a new Haiti emerge from its legacy?

Video:  Laurent Dubois talks about What We Must Know in Order to Help Haiti:

http://www.temple.edu/

12/17/12 - Monday’s Topical Currents is with Temple University Professor Joan Mellen, whose latest book is OUR MAN IN HAITI:  George de Mohrenschildt & the CIA in the Nightmare Republic.  It tracks the role of the U.S. military and CIA in the internal life of Haiti, particularly during the despotic reign of Francois (Papa Doc) Duvalier.  Mellen cites ties to the U-S Mafia, drug traffic, and even the Kennedy assassination.

Viter Juste, founder of 'Little Haiti,' Dies at 87

Nov 30, 2012
Carl Juste

"Little Haiti" has lost perhaps the man who could be called its father and the man who is credited for the name.

Viter Juste has died at the age of 87.

He was born in La Gonaive, Haiti in 1924 and after first going to New York, he and his family made their way to Miami in 1973.

He started with a house in Buena Vista and a record store in downtown Miami, "Les Cousins."

That led to creating the first Haitian newspaper for the growing community,  Haitian Florida and the Haitian American Community Association of Dade.

Arianna Prothero

The United States Southern Command has a new boss. 

Introducing Book Fair Readers To Haiti

Nov 15, 2012
Miami Book Fair International Website

All week, we're talking with Florida authors appearing at the Miami Book Fair. So Spoke the Earth is an anthology of stories, poems and essays about Haiti.

The book is divided into three sections: death and tragedy; the nation’s rich storytelling tradition; and Haiti’s economic struggles.

Although the book was published in the United States (by Women Writers of Haitian Descent), all of the pieces in the second section are in French or Haitian Creole. 

NEWSCAST: Romney Campaigns In Miami

Nov 1, 2012
Kenny Malone

Mitt Romney tries to pivot from disaster in the northeast to the final week of campaigning in Florida. Meanwhile, the death toll rises in Haiti as a result of Sandy. 

Deb Acosta

There's one more presidential debate left, and it takes place in the most crucial swing state of them all.  Host Phil Latzman along with panel of journalists, politicians and an academic discuss U.S. foreign policy and domestic issues important to Florida voters.  

USAID Head Talks About Haiti

Oct 17, 2012
USAID

The head of the United States Agency for International Development was in South Florida to speak to Florida International University students about possible volunteer service with the government organization.

Rajiv Shah  stopped by the WLRN-Miami Herald studios and spoke at length about his agency’s work in earthquake-devastated Haiti.

“I’m very confident that Haiti will emerge a stronger and more resilient country."

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