01/08/13 - Tuesday's Topical Currents is with historian Laurent Dubois, author of HAITI:  The Aftershocks of History.  Even before the 2010 earthquake destroyed much of the country, Haiti was known for its poverty and corruption.  Dubois says Haiti can only be understood by its complex past and inception as the only successful slave revolt in world history.  Can a new Haiti emerge from its legacy?

Video:  Laurent Dubois talks about What We Must Know in Order to Help Haiti:


12/17/12 - Monday’s Topical Currents is with Temple University Professor Joan Mellen, whose latest book is OUR MAN IN HAITI:  George de Mohrenschildt & the CIA in the Nightmare Republic.  It tracks the role of the U.S. military and CIA in the internal life of Haiti, particularly during the despotic reign of Francois (Papa Doc) Duvalier.  Mellen cites ties to the U-S Mafia, drug traffic, and even the Kennedy assassination.

Viter Juste, founder of 'Little Haiti,' Dies at 87

Nov 30, 2012
Carl Juste

"Little Haiti" has lost perhaps the man who could be called its father and the man who is credited for the name.

Viter Juste has died at the age of 87.

He was born in La Gonaive, Haiti in 1924 and after first going to New York, he and his family made their way to Miami in 1973.

He started with a house in Buena Vista and a record store in downtown Miami, "Les Cousins."

That led to creating the first Haitian newspaper for the growing community,  Haitian Florida and the Haitian American Community Association of Dade.

Arianna Prothero

The United States Southern Command has a new boss. 

Introducing Book Fair Readers To Haiti

Nov 15, 2012
Miami Book Fair International Website

All week, we're talking with Florida authors appearing at the Miami Book Fair. So Spoke the Earth is an anthology of stories, poems and essays about Haiti.

The book is divided into three sections: death and tragedy; the nation’s rich storytelling tradition; and Haiti’s economic struggles.

Although the book was published in the United States (by Women Writers of Haitian Descent), all of the pieces in the second section are in French or Haitian Creole. 

NEWSCAST: Romney Campaigns In Miami

Nov 1, 2012
Kenny Malone

Mitt Romney tries to pivot from disaster in the northeast to the final week of campaigning in Florida. Meanwhile, the death toll rises in Haiti as a result of Sandy. 

Deb Acosta

There's one more presidential debate left, and it takes place in the most crucial swing state of them all.  Host Phil Latzman along with panel of journalists, politicians and an academic discuss U.S. foreign policy and domestic issues important to Florida voters.  

USAID Head Talks About Haiti

Oct 17, 2012

The head of the United States Agency for International Development was in South Florida to speak to Florida International University students about possible volunteer service with the government organization.

Rajiv Shah  stopped by the WLRN-Miami Herald studios and spoke at length about his agency’s work in earthquake-devastated Haiti.

“I’m very confident that Haiti will emerge a stronger and more resilient country."

One Year After The Quake: “Las Twins”

Oct 3, 2012
Carmen Maria Romero

Carmen Maria Romero was one of the four medical workers in Haiti whose voices you heard in After the Quake: Patients and Healers. She’s a physical therapist who had already been volunteering in Haiti for ten years, and who traveled there last January to help with the relief efforts.

Romero was so moved by the suffering and the resilience of her patients that she decided to quit her job and relocate to Haiti.

Lost Between Two Nations

Jan 11, 2012
Jacob Kushner

When an earthquake struck Haiti in January 2010, the United States stopped deporting Haitian immigrants to the devastated nation. But deportations resumed last January, and Franco Coby, 24, of Fort Myers, found himself banished from the country he grew up in since the age of 6.

Muralist Makes His Mark In Little Haiti

Sep 14, 2011
Trina Sargalski

If you’ve ever visited Little Haiti, you’ve probably seen Miami muralist Serge Toussaint’s work, which is sprinkled throughout the city. How can you tell it’s his work? His signature is a dollar sign instead of an “S” in Serge. He spends most of his time in Little Haiti, but his work can be seen in Liberty City, Little River, Allapattah, the Miami River and all the way to Fort Lauderdale.

Surviving Survival: Earthquake Victims In Limbo

Sep 7, 2011
Tina Antolini

After the earthquake hit Haiti in 2010, thousands of Haitians fled to South Florida to escape the devastation in their country. Some were able to leave Haiti on tourist visas. Others came as guardians to their injured children. No matter how they came to the country, most have been living in limbo in the United States.

A Journalist Turns His Mic On Haiti's Grievances

Jan 13, 2011

One of the aftereffects of the earthquake in Haiti is that local journalists have found new freedom. Many are now airing the kinds of political commentary and criticism that used to invite violence and censure– even death.

The shift comes across loud and clear on Haiti’s airwaves, where most people get their news.

Jennifer Maloney brings us the story of Haitian radio host and reporter Makenson Remy, known to listeners as “Four-by-Four” because of his rugged brand of go-anywhere reporting.

InnoVida, LLC

In March, 150 nations pledged more than $5 billion dollars to rebuild Haiti.  Construction firms around the world, and especially in South Florida, began jockeying for those funds.  Developers and planners from South Florida bid on contracts to build roads, construct housing, and remove debris.  And not just developers and planners.  Even Royal Caribbean, based in Miami, bid on housing contracts.

Miami Children's Hospital

After the earthquake, nine-year-old Peterson Exais was trapped under rubble for four days. Once he was rescued, Peterson was rushed to a tent hospital in Port-au-Prince.  Chad Perlyn was the first doctor available. He is a pediatric plastic surgeon at Miami Children’s Hospital.

Perlyn knew the tent hospital was not equipped to treat Peterson. So he put the boy on a list for treatment at one of the U.S. hospitals that were tending to young earthquake victims– hospitals in far-flung cities like Orlando, Atlanta, and Philadelphia.