Haiti

Americas
8:00 am
Wed August 14, 2013

Why FIU's Frank Mora Worries As Much About Brazil, Venezuela As Cuba

Frank Mora, Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defense for the Western Hemisphere, speaking at the National Defense University in Washington, D.C.

Besides the horrific carnage inside Port-au-Prince, one of my most vivid memories of the 2010 Haiti earthquake is military helicopters idling out in Port-au-Prince Bay.

From the bridge of the Navy aircraft carrier U.S.S. Carl Vinson, I watched H-53 and Seahawk choppers waiting for rescue and relief supplies that seemed agonizingly slow in arriving from U.S. and other foreign aid sources. International coordination, in fact, felt as wanting in those first few post-quake days as the food and medicine.

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Americas
6:00 am
Wed June 19, 2013

How 1993 Hunger Strikes Prepare Florida For A Possible Haitian Exodus Today

Many Haitian refugees took to rickety boats to escape their military regime's violence.
Credit Holly Ackerman/blog.gitmomemory.org

  The rise in the number of Haitians being detained at sea, at airports and at border crossings this year has the international community scratching as well as turning its head. More than 70 picked up by the U.S. Coast Guard in the waters off Puerto Rico; 33 by authorities off Jamaica; almost 3,500 in or off the Dominican Republic; 65 as far away as Peru.

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The Florida Roundup
12:00 pm
Fri June 14, 2013

A New Era For U.S.-Latin American Relations?

In a special edition of The Florida Roundup, we focus on our broader region, Latin America and the Caribbean. 

China's President Xi Jinping recently concluded a visit to Mexico, Costa Rica and Trinidad, shortly after President Obama and Vice President Biden paid visits there.

We discuss if Obama's second term will include stronger Latin American relations and China's ambitions in the Western hemisphere. 

Plus: why Venezuelans are buying suitcases of toilet paper and other basic goods in South Florida.

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Photography
3:09 pm
Wed June 5, 2013

See The Beauty In Haiti With Photographer Maggie Steber's New Show In Coral Gables

Credit Maggie Steber

Picture images of developing countries in American media and you’ll likely think of a few recurring tropes — photos depicting squalid living conditions and political strife.

“We always end up looking at poor countries as being fraught with tragedy and poverty,” says documentary photographer Maggie Steber, in a video trailer for her new solo show opening in Coral Gables on Thursday. “We don’t recognize what is beautiful. We don’t equate what is beautiful.”

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Arts
7:32 am
Sun June 2, 2013

Exploring the History of Vodou in Haiti from the 1804 Revolution to the 2010 Earthquake

Ramsey's book delves into the roll Vodou has played in Haiti.

University of Miami Associate Professor Kate Ramsey's The Spirits and the Law: Vodou and Power in Haiti has been awarded the 2011-2012 Association of Caribbean Historians Elsa Goveia Prize; this book prize is awarded once every two years.

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Miami Dish
4:30 pm
Tue April 16, 2013

Coping With Tough Times: Start With Dinner

Credit New World Library

"I think feeding the deeper hunger and serving the world starts with what you serve for dinner," says writer Ellen Kanner. She admits "that's asking a lot of dinner."  Feeding the deeper hunger is the unifying theme of her new memoir and cookbook, Feeding the Hungry Ghost: Life, Faith and What to Eat for Dinner.

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Arts
7:02 am
Mon April 8, 2013

Palm Beach International Film Festival: Four Documentaries To See (VIDEO)

'Haiti Untold' will have its US premiere at Palm Beach International Film Festival.
Credit Courtesy photo / Palm Beach International Film Festival

The Palm Beach International Film Festival boasts a few star-studded indie films, but the schedule also is packed with a host of alternately gritty and inspirational documentaries featuring everyday folks in extraordinary circumstances. 

The festival, which kicked off on April 4, continues through Thursday. Every day, there are a dozen or so films screening at various theaters throughout Palm Beach County. You can't be everywhere at once, so below are four documentaries to consider making a priority at this year's festival. 

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Under the Sun
6:31 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Edwidge Danticat’s Letter To Miami

Author Edwidge Danticat during an interview with Mitchell Kaplan, owner of Books & Books.
Trina Sargalski

This piece originally aired July 2011.

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Under the Sun
4:00 pm
Mon March 18, 2013

Author Edwidge Danticat On Life As A Haitian Immigrant And Writing Her First Memoir

Books & Books owner Mitchell Kaplan and author Edwidge Danticat
Ruth Morris

Books & Books bookstore owner Mitchell Kaplan speaks with award-winning author Edwidge Danticat about her experience as an Haitian immigrant living in Brooklyn, what it’s like to live in Miami now, and about writing the memoir

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Haiti Recovery
8:55 am
Thu February 28, 2013

What Happened To The Aid Meant To Rebuild Haiti?

Many homes that were rebuilt after the earthquake in 2010 are even more dangerous than the original ones. This three-story home was put up after the quake but is already slated for demolition to make way for an 18-unit housing project.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon March 4, 2013 4:39 pm

After a devastating earthquake hit Haiti in 2010, governments and foundations from around the world pledged more than $9 billion to help get the country back on its feet.

Only a fraction of the money ever made it. And Haiti's President Michel Martelly says the funds aren't "showing results."

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Latin America
6:31 am
Thu February 14, 2013

Will 'Made In Haiti' Factories Improve Life In Haiti?

Workers prepare the foundation for a new warehouse and manufacturing facility at the Caracol Industrial Park in northern Haiti. The park, which opened last year, is still under construction.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Fri February 15, 2013 3:05 am

Three years after the devastating Port-au-Prince earthquake, one of the largest international relief projects in Haiti isn't anywhere near where the quake hit. It's an industrial park on the north coast halfway between Cap-Haitien and the border with the Dominican Republic.

Aid agencies are pouring millions of dollars into the project to encourage people to move out of the overcrowded capital and create jobs. Critics, however, say the jobs don't pay enough to lift people out of poverty.

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Haiti Cholera
2:49 pm
Tue January 15, 2013

After Bringing Cholera To Haiti, U.N. Plans To Get Rid Of It

Haitians protest against the United Nations peacekeepers in Port-au-Prince in November 2010.
Hector Retamal AFP/Getty Images

Originally published on Sat January 12, 2013 11:11 pm

Not quite 10 months after Haiti's devastating 2010 earthquake, a more insidious disaster struck: cholera.

Haiti hadn't seen cholera for at least a century. Then suddenly, the first cases appeared in the central highlands near a camp for United Nations peacekeeping forces.

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Haiti Aid
11:38 am
Tue January 15, 2013

Despite Billions In Aid, Many Haitians Still Live In Squalid Camps

Jacqueline Syra has been living in the La Piste camp for three years. She says she has no idea when she will be able to leave.
David Gilkey NPR

Originally published on Mon January 14, 2013 9:06 am

Saturday marks the third anniversary of the powerful earthquake that destroyed much of the Haitian capital, Port-au-Prince. The quake killed roughly 200,000 people and left 1.5 million Haitians homeless.

Despite billions of dollars in international aid and pledges to help Haiti rebuild from the disaster, very little new, permanent housing has been built. And about 350,000 Haitians are still living in squalid, makeshift camps — where they face an array of health challenges.

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Haiti Three Years Later: Part III
6:00 am
Wed January 9, 2013

Slideshow: Fabienne Jean, Three Years After The Haiti Earthquake

Fabienne Jean sits contemplative at home.
Nick Kozak

All week long we've been bringing you the story of Fabienne Jean, a dancer who lost her leg in the earthquake in Haiti three years ago this month. 

A prosthetic technician from Boston heard her story and fitted Fabienne with a fake leg. He tried to help Fabienne recover in other ways too. He hatched plans to help her start her business, buy a house and open a dance studio to raise money for Haitian amputees. 

But as reporter Jacob Kushner discovered, Fabienne's recovery has been a slow, frustrating process. 

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Topical Currents
1:00 pm
Tue January 8, 2013

HAITI: The Aftershocks of History

Historian/author Laurent Dubois
http://duboisl2.wordpress.com/

01/08/13 - Tuesday's Topical Currents is with historian Laurent Dubois, author of HAITI:  The Aftershocks of History.  Even before the 2010 earthquake destroyed much of the country, Haiti was known for its poverty and corruption.  Dubois says Haiti can only be understood by its complex past and inception as the only successful slave revolt in world history.  Can a new Haiti emerge from its legacy?

Video:  Laurent Dubois talks about What We Must Know in Order to Help Haiti:

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