Haiti Earthquake

Patrick Farrell

On Jan. 12, 2010, former Associated Press reporter Jonathan Katz was the only full-time American correspondent in Haiti when the earthquake hit. The massive quake left hundreds of thousands of people dead and more than a million homeless.

In the immediate aftermath of the disaster, foreign aid was pledged from all corners of the world. But six years after the devastating earthquake --  in spite of the combined efforts of international aid organizations, foreign governments and Haiti's own leaders – Haiti is still struggling to rebuild.

Rupa Shenoy/WGBH

Seventeen-year-old Ricardo Cherry won’t talk about what happened when an earthquake hit Haiti in 2010. All he’ll say is that the uncle he was living with was killed.

“Everytime I try to think about it … it just bring me some bad dreams,” he said.

But even when he doesn’t think about the earthquake, it affects him. When he got to the US, Cherry lived in a two-bedroom apartment in Boston with his mother, two brothers and a sister. He played video games compulsively.

Nonprofit organization Color of Hope is remembering the victims of the 2010 Haiti earthquake by updating a digital memorial wall with 12 names every hour on Monday, Jan. 12.

Five years ago, the disaster ended over 300,000 lives -- and Color of Hope has been maintaining a memorial ever since. The wall can be found at 112haiti.com.

Ed Shakespierre, the organization’s founder, sought to represent victims who he says may have remained nameless otherwise.

Patrick Farrell / Miami Herald

Five years ago today Haiti – the western hemisphere’s poorest country – was devastated by an earthquake that killed some 300,000 people. Haitian officials, the U.S. and other donor countries promised to “build back Haiti better.” But so far the question is whether they’ve been able to build back Haiti… much at all.

Patrick Farrell / Miami Herald

Monsignor Augustin Almy was in Haiti five years ago when the earthquake hit. When the country’s Catholic Church fell apart along with most of Port-au-Prince on Jan. 12, 2010.

Almy, a priest at St. James Catholic Church in North Miami, was visiting Haiti for his mother’s 100th birthday.

He was in his room at the Port-au-Prince seminary where he worked for years before moving to South Florida.

“I see the house shaking,” he said.

It was 4:53 pm.

3.3 Magnitude Earthquake Hits Haiti

Jan 20, 2014

The U.S. Geological Survey is reporting that a 3.3 magnitude earthquake shook Haiti about 6 miles southwest of Carrefour at 1:56 a.m. this morning.

A USGS map shows that there have been tremors near the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico in the last few days. 

About two weeks ago, there was a 5.1 magnitude earthquake between Key West and Cuba.

DCF, Shakespeare And The Lieutenant Governor

Jan 20, 2014
WALTER MICHOT / MIAMI HERALD STAFF

On The Florida Roundup: After a nine-month vacancy, Gov. Rick Scott picks a new lieutenant governor.  Miami-Dade property appraiser Carlos Lopez-Cantera becomes the first Hispanic to hold the position.   

The governor’s other announcement this week was a $40 million increase for the Department of Children and Families and child abuse investigations, after the deaths of dozens of children who had contact with the agency. But is money the issue? Or the constant turnover in who leads DCF, which still has an interim secretary?

haiti.usembassy.gov

Right after Haiti’s catastrophic 2010 earthquake, which killed more than 200,000 people, I rode in a U.S. Army helicopter ferrying food and medical supplies into demolished Port-au-Prince neighborhoods.

As we descended near the suburb of Pétionville, and as corpses became visible amid the ruins and campfire smoke billowed up in our faces, the pilot said he couldn’t put us down. Too many people were running to the landing spot, and they risked being killed by the chopper rotors.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

Reporter Wilson Sayre went to one of several events held in Miami to commemorate the 2010 earthquake in Haiti. Hear what she heard at the march below.

A 5.0-magnitude earthquake was reported off the coast of Cuba Thursday, Jan. 9, just days before the anniversary of the 7.0-magnitude quake that devastated Haiti four years ago. 

Not quite 10 months after Haiti's devastating 2010 earthquake, a more insidious disaster struck: cholera.

Haiti hadn't seen cholera for at least a century. Then suddenly, the first cases appeared in the central highlands near a camp for United Nations peacekeeping forces.

A Poetic Journey After The Quake: HIV/AIDs In Haiti

Jan 15, 2013
Photos by Andre Lambertson, Haiti, 2010.

 

The devastating 2010 earthquake in Haiti demolished the country's health care system along with everything else.

But from the ruins came Voices of Haiti -- an odyssey in verse that grew out of a commission from the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting to document HIV/AIDS after the quake. The multimedia project, which came to the University of Miami this year, blends Haitian voices to conjure up images of strength, hope and faith.

Nick Kozak

All this week we've been bringing you the story of Fabienne Jean, a dancer who lost her right leg three years ago in the earthquake in Haiti.

Fabienne’s right leg was crushed and had to be amputated. When she danced again, she was hailed as a symbol of Haiti’s post-earthquake recovery.

But as reporter Jacob Kushner discovered during the year he spent reporting on this story, the quest to rebuild one woman’s life would take much more than that.

Twitter

It's been three years since an earthquake leveled Port au Prince and shook all of us indirectly in South Florida, home to the nation's largest population of Haitian-Americans.

Miami Herald reporter Jacqueline Charles remembers January 12, 2010, well.

That day, Charles was in the process of writing a story about Haiti's latest mess, a controversy over the government taking a loan from Venezuela to help the country rebuild an airport.

After The Haiti Earthquake, Fabienne Jean Dances Again

Jan 10, 2013
Nick Kozak

 

All this week we've been bringing you the story of Fabienne Jean, a dancer who lost her leg in the earthquake in Haiti three years ago. A prosthetic technician from Boston helped Fabienne get a replacement leg.

He hoped to help her recover in other ways too: to start  a business, buy a house and open up a dance studio. 

But none of these things came to pass. Late spring, Fabienne was struggling to find money to take care of her bedridden mother and adopted daughter. 

In the final installment of our series, Jacob Kushner tells us where she is now. 

Nick Kozak

All week long we've been bringing you the story of Fabienne Jean, a dancer who lost her leg in the earthquake in Haiti three years ago this month. 

A prosthetic technician from Boston heard her story and fitted Fabienne with a fake leg. He tried to help Fabienne recover in other ways too. He hatched plans to help her start her business, buy a house and open a dance studio to raise money for Haitian amputees. 

But as reporter Jacob Kushner discovered, Fabienne's recovery has been a slow, frustrating process. 

Pages