Haiti

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Guests for Sundial on Wednesday, May 2, 2018:

South Florida has not been spared in the nation's opioid crisis. In Palm Beach County alone, there were 600 opioid related deaths last year. Dr. Dennis Patin specializes in anesthesiology and pain management. He joined the program to discuss what's fueling the opioid epidemic and alternative treatments for pain beyond prescribing medication. 

Getty images via Miami Herald

The Trump administration has slapped Haiti again.

As of Thursday, Haitian farmers and other laborers seeking to come to the United States as temporary, seasonal workers under the federal H-2A and H-2B guest worker program, will no longer be eligible.

The temporary workers’ visa has for decades allowed hundreds of U.S. farmers, hoteliers and other business owners to hire thousands of foreign seasonal workers.

Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

COMMENTARY

If you’re still wondering why U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions puts up with all those humiliating public smack-downs from his boss, President Trump, then hop on the Internet and watch the video of him on Fox News Tuesday night.

By now, you've likely heard about President Trump's reported remark last week that the U.S. should bring in more people from Norway instead of from "shithole countries" like El Salvador, Haiti and African nations.

The reaction was swift and loud. Citizens (and allies) of those countries filled social media pages with photos of idyllic beaches, city skylines and shiny structures in so-called "shithole countries."

They also shared impressive lists of personal achievements that ended with: "I'm from a #shithole country."

The Secretary of Homeland Security testified Tuesday that she did not hear President Trump use a vulgarity in a meeting with lawmakers about immigration last week.

The president was widely reported to have used a disparaging word to describe African nations and wondered aloud why people from countries like Haiti were allowed to come to the United States.

Scott Travis, Sun Sentinel

About 200 Haitian-Americans and their supporters used the Martin Luther King Jr. holiday to protest derogatory comments President Trump reportedly made about immigrants from majority-black countries.

“What do we want? Apology!” the protesters chanted.

The protest, held on Southern Boulevard near the Intracoastal bridge, was in reaction to remarks calling Haiti and some African nations “shithole” countries, which were attributed to the president from a meeting Thursday on immigration.

AL DIAZ - MIAMI HERALD

President Donald Trump met with leading lawmakers last week to talk about immigration. According to the Washington Post and other media outlets, Trump asked, "Why do we want all these people from 'shithole countries' coming here?" referring to Haiti, El Salvador and some African nations. 

Updated at 12:45 p.m. ET

One day after President Trump referred to African nations as "shithole countries," adding that the U.S. should want immigrants from countries such as Norway rather than from Haiti or El Salvador, the countries that came in for the president's criticism are offering some responses of their own.

Updated at 7:37 p.m. ET

President Trump is denying reports, from NPR and other news outlets, that in a Thursday meeting at the White House he disparaged African nations as "shithole countries" and questioned why the United States would admit immigrants from them and other nations, like Haiti.

Trump told lawmakers that the U.S. should instead seek out more immigrants from countries like Norway.

Scott: Trump Immigration Remarks ‘Absolutely Wrong’

Jan 12, 2018
Gage Skidmore / Flickr

Gov. Rick Scott on Thursday blasted President Donald Trump for reportedly disparaging Haiti, El Salvador and Africa during a bipartisan White House meeting about immigration reform.

According to several news outlets, including The Washington Post, The New York Times and the Los Angeles Times, Trump reportedly questioned why the United States should accept immigrants from “s---hole countries” like Haiti, El Salvador and countries in Africa.

Bryan Cereijo for The Miami Herald

Music has long been used as a vehicle to drive social awareness forward. Artists like Bob Marley and Gil Scott-Heron tackled political issues head-on in their lyrics and used their voices to speak for the forgotten, marginalized people. Such artists are found in all corners of the world.

In Haiti, Joseph Emmanuel “Manno” Charlemagne followed this tradition fervently, writing songs about Haitian politics and the circumstances of his countrymen. Charlemagne died Sunday, Dec. 10, in a Miami Beach hospital where he was being treated for cancer.      

Jacqueline Charles / Miami Herald

Joseph Emmanuel “Manno” Charlemagne, whose acerbic folk songs about Haitian politics kept him in exile — often in South Florida — for much of his life, died Sunday in a Miami Beach hospital where he was being treated for cancer.

Al Diaz / Miami Herald

The leader of Miami-Dade County public schools sharply criticized the Trump administration’s immigration policies Tuesday morning during a keynote that sounded like part stump speech, part sermon.

Superintendent Alberto Carvalho delivered an impassioned address opening a bipartisan summit on immigration reform at the University of Miami, relating his own “journey” as a Portuguese immigrant who was once in the U.S. illegally.

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