gun violence

Jessica Bakeman / WLRN

Broward Health Medical Center received seven patients after Wednesday’s shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland. They were all kids.

This week, when a district court in Las Vegas unsealed nearly 300 pages of police affidavits, the name of a second person of interest in the mass shooting that left 58 people dead was blacked out.

But because of an error, the documents released to The Las Vegas Review-Journal included name of an Arizona man named Douglas Haig, according to the newspaper. And it started another frenzy over whether Stephen Paddock acted alone.

Marsha Halper / WLRN

Sammie Willis was a talker. He held court from his wheelchair—the man was a fixture at the gate to his small, cinder block apartment complex in Overtown—and talked to his neighbors, to the parents walking their kids to school, to the young men who cycled through this block. He greeted them all with a booming voice that resonated down the street. He talked to them about their families. About God. About love. About the hard things in life.

 

Yaneli Gonzalez / WLRN

For the past 20 years, Miami-Dade County officials have held annual press conferences before New Year’s Eve and the Fourth of July to remind citizens that “One Bullet Kills the Party.”

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A Miami anti-violence activist crumpled onto the floor in a Tallahassee courtroom screaming after the man who shot and killed her son was found not guilty.

Tangela Sears’ son David Queen was killed during an argument at the Tallahassee apartment complex where he lived in 2015.

Police are scouring Tampa's Seminole Heights neighborhood, one day after a man was gunned down on Nebraska Avenue. It was the fourth murder in a month in the area north of downtown Tampa.

Provided / The John Lennon Educational Tour Bus

When the John Lennon Educational Tour Bus pulled up at Hialeah Gardens High School, many students didn’t know much about the famous late Beatle.

Some wondered if he was on the bus himself. One insisted to her friend his last name was “Legend.”

But when the educators who drive the bus-turned-recording-studio-on-wheels played the 1971 song “Imagine” and other Beatles tunes, the kids understood the messages. They know what it’s like to yearn for a world without violence.

Editor's Note: This story was originally published in October and has been republished with updates in the wake of the shooting Sunday in Sutherland Springs, Texas.

Barely a month after the massacre in Las Vegas, another horrific attack has underscored the persistence of gun violence in the United States. At least 26 people are dead after the shooting this Sunday at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas.

Updated Monday at 5:10 a.m. ET

Federal authorities are investigating a shooting at the First Baptist Church in Sutherland Springs, Texas, a small community southeast of San Antonio.

In a news conference Sunday night, an official from the Texas Department of Public Safety described the scene: Around 11:20 a.m., a man dressed in black tactical gear approached the church and began firing an assault rifle. He then entered the church and continued firing.

Gualberto107 / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

It’s been a month since the deadly shooting in Las Vegas that killed 58 people and injured hundreds more, and a group of trauma researchers is calling for better attention to the health impacts of firearms.

Nadege Green / WLRN

In a nondescript  West Palm beach strip mall is a small office; on the door, it reads Mothers Against Murderers Association.

Also known as MAMA, the nonprofit is a meeting space for families who have lost loved ones to gun violence in Palm Beach County.

Markie Henderson is grateful that her brother and sister got out of the Route 91 country music festival in Las Vegas alive. They were separated in the rush to escape the shooting, she says, but unlike hundreds of others, both got out physically unharmed.

Henderson wonders what could motivate someone to fire into a crowd of people.

"For the families that were affected, I'd want to know what happened to my brother or sister if it was one of them, for sure," she said.

David Santiago / Miami Herald

South Florida Republican U.S. Rep. Carlos Curbelo  says he is ready to revisit the issue of gun safety in an interview with WLRN's Sundial.

This puts him at odds with his party's leadership in Congress.

During an interview with host Luis Hernandez, Curbelo said, "Right now the best candidate for a common denominator is to focus on these bump stock devices which are so deadly and so potent."

A dozen of the rifles Las Vegas mass shooter Stephen Paddock had inside his hotel room when he opened fire Sunday night were modified with bump-fire stocks.

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