gun violence

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

Martin Luther King Jr. Day in Miami-Dade ended on a note of violence Monday afternoon after a shooting left at least eight people injured at a park that bears the late civil rights leader's name.

David Santiago / El Nuevo Herald

Days after a gunman killed five people at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport, Broward County commissioners held a closed-door meeting Tuesday to talk about airport security.

Florida law allows local governments to close meetings about security at facilities owned or leased by the state or county.

Every year in the U.S., more than 30,000 people die from things related to guns.

That puts guns ahead of HIV, Parkinson's disease, malnutrition, hypertension, intestinal infection, peptic ulcer, anemia, viral hepatitis, biliary tract disease, atherosclerosis and fires. Yet, the funding for research on gun violence lags far behind other leading causes of death, according to a study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Deadly encounters between police and civilians often made 2016 a year full of palpable tension. Across the country, demonstrators took to the streets to protest police shootings, while at the same time officers in a number of states were targeted and killed by gunmen.

Both situations have prompted law enforcement to examine use-of-force policies.

Lenny Pozner and his family moved from Connecticut to Florida after his 6 year-old son Noah was killed in the Sandy Hook School shooting.  Pozner had hoped for some peace, but that's far from what he got.

Since his son died, Pozner says he's been constantly harassed by people who believe the shooting never happened. “Hoaxers,” he calls them.

It's been a year since Ray Britain lay on the floor of the Inland Regional Center in San Bernardino, Calif., feeling the vibrations of the gun shots.

He remembers that "constant tremble," he says, the ringing in his ears, the shell casings — "a rainbow of shell casings" — flying from the gun, and the looks of shock on his coworkers' faces.

This year, a Sweet 16 birthday party came under fire leaving six teens injured. The youngest was 13.

 

A 15-year old boy was killed at a  wake in North Miami-Dade.  

Six-year-old King Carter was gunned down as he was walking to go buy candy.

 

Rowan Moore Gerety WLRN

This week on The Florida Roundup...

On Thursday, Governor Rick Scott announced that at least five people had contracted the Zika virus in Miami's Little River neighborhood. Now, there's a new Zika zone in the county, between Northwest 79th and 63rd Streets from Northwest 10th Avenue to North Miami Avenue. We get the latest from WLRN's health reporter Sammy Mack

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WLRN is looking at the impact of children and teens killed by guns in Miami-Dade County through the voices of some of the people who are most affected.

Tequila Forshee was 12 years old when she was killed inside her grandmother's Miami Gardens home on Aug. 14, 2013.

Bullets ripped through the living room walls and windows striking Tequila as she was getting her hair braided.

Nadege Green / WLRN

The photo captures a grief-stricken mother at her 8-year old daughter’s grave site-- a little girl felled by a bullet in North Miami-Dade.

Rosalind Brown is lying down on the freshly planted grass clutching a blanket near Jada Page’s temporary grave marker.

Courstesy Lori Hadley-Davis / WLRN

Jada Page was shot in the head  in a drive-by shooting on August 28.  Two days later, she died from her injuries in the hospital. She was 8 years old.

The little girl who loved to dance and was the life of family gatherings was not the intended target.

Charles Trainor Jr. / Miami Herald

Just days after 8-year-old Jada Page died from a gunshot wound to the head in a drive-by shooting, funeral home director Lori Hadley Davis embalmed her niece’s tiny body.

Health News Florida

Keeping guns away from those with serious mental illness could help reduce gun suicides.

  

That’s according to a new study out this week in the Health Affairs journal that looked at more than 81,000 adults in Florida with serious mental illness. Researchers got data on residents in Tampa and Miami with schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and major depression who received care in a publicly-funded health care setting; that data was married with court records and health records.

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