gun violence

Illustration-Camila Kerwin

This week on The Florida Roundup...

In the past decade, more than 850 children and teenagers were rushed to Ryder Trauma Center at Jackson Memorial Hospital in Miami. 

Carl Juste / Miami Herald

Martin Luther King Jr. Day in Miami-Dade ended on a note of violence Monday afternoon after a shooting left at least eight people injured at a park that bears the late civil rights leader's name.

David Santiago / El Nuevo Herald

Days after a gunman killed five people at Fort Lauderdale-Hollywood International Airport, Broward County commissioners held a closed-door meeting Tuesday to talk about airport security.

Florida law allows local governments to close meetings about security at facilities owned or leased by the state or county.

Every year in the U.S., more than 30,000 people die from things related to guns.

That puts guns ahead of HIV, Parkinson's disease, malnutrition, hypertension, intestinal infection, peptic ulcer, anemia, viral hepatitis, biliary tract disease, atherosclerosis and fires. Yet, the funding for research on gun violence lags far behind other leading causes of death, according to a study published Tuesday in the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Deadly encounters between police and civilians often made 2016 a year full of palpable tension. Across the country, demonstrators took to the streets to protest police shootings, while at the same time officers in a number of states were targeted and killed by gunmen.

Both situations have prompted law enforcement to examine use-of-force policies.

Lenny Pozner and his family moved from Connecticut to Florida after his 6 year-old son Noah was killed in the Sandy Hook School shooting.  Pozner had hoped for some peace, but that's far from what he got.

Since his son died, Pozner says he's been constantly harassed by people who believe the shooting never happened. “Hoaxers,” he calls them.

It's been a year since Ray Britain lay on the floor of the Inland Regional Center in San Bernardino, Calif., feeling the vibrations of the gun shots.

He remembers that "constant tremble," he says, the ringing in his ears, the shell casings — "a rainbow of shell casings" — flying from the gun, and the looks of shock on his coworkers' faces.

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