global warming

United Nations

Before he was president of Costa Rica, Luis Guillermo Solís was a professor at Florida International University. He had a homecoming on Friday when he spoke at FIU on topics like climate change and the future of Venezuelan democracy. 

Solís was a Fulbright professor at FIU at the turn of the century, researching Latin American issues. After addressing the U.N. general assembly this week, Solís came to talk at FIU’s Main Campus about those same concerns.

PR Newswire/AP

President Trump fulfilled one of his big campaign promises on Tuesday: He signed an executive order that directed the Environmental Protection Agency to roll back the Obama administration’s Clean Power Plan.

That plan was intended to cut harmful carbon emissions by replacing coal-fired power plants with renewable energy sources. Trump wants to repeal it as a step towards boosting the struggling coal industry.

But in Florida and across the country, it's doubtful the rollback will have much impact -- positive or negative, says University of Miami economist David Kelly.

Wilson Sayre / WLRN

  Between air conditioning, lights and appliances, buildings consume a lot of energy. That high energy consumption requires high energy production --  from sources like coal and oil, which contribute to global warming and sea-level rise.

 

All of which threatens the future livability of Miami-Dade County. 

 

Logan Riely / Miami Herald

COMMENTARY 

 

Dr. Esper Kallas shared a prediction about Zika with me earlier this year. And I could have made big bucks betting that unfortunately he’d be right.

If you think it's been hot this year, you're right. The latest temperature numbers from NASA and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration say the first six months of 2016 were the hottest on record around the planet.

Valters Boze/flickr

A climate change litmus test has been circulating around Tallahassee. The man behind the test wants to get lawmakers and other state leaders on the record about their feelings regarding climate change and the risk to Florida.

'Global bleaching event' threatens corals around the world

Oct 9, 2015
XL Catlin Seaview Survey

A quarter of the world’s marine species depend on coral reefs for habitat. A half-billion people rely on them for their livelihoods or sustenance.

Researchers say we’re now in the midst of the third global coral bleaching event in less than 20 years. And that by the time it’s all played out, the world may have lost another 5 percent of its corals, with a murky future ahead for the rest.

350.org/flickr

Disputing reports that state agencies are prohibited from using the words "climate change," top environmental official Jonathan Steverson repeatedly uttered the phrase during a confirmation hearing Wednesday.

Steverson, who was appointed in December by Gov. Rick Scott as secretary of Florida Department of Environmental Protection, told the Senate Environmental Preservation and Conservation Committee his agency has no policy against "climate change."

Christine Zenino/flickr

Warmer temperatures are causing glaciers to melt in places like Antarctica and Greenland. What’s in those glaciers may have a significant effect on ecosystems downstream. Those massive chunks of ice harbor a lot of organic carbon – like soot and byproducts from fossil fuel combustion.

All water, from tap water to the oceans, is full of organic carbon in varying forms and concentrations.

USGS

  Late-summer waters off the Florida Keys are two degrees hotter than a century ago, according to a new report from the U.S. Geological Survey.

The report compares two periods of summer-month water temperature: historic data from lighthouse keeper records from the late 1800s and three decades of recent temperature data.

National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

Coral reefs have been under assault for decades from water pollution, coastal construction and overfishing. But coral today face a new and bigger danger – and that matters a lot to South Florida livelihoods.

The federal government is designating 20 more types of coral as threatened under the Endangered Species Act, five of which are prevalent off South Florida’s coast. 

The reason: climate change.

Gina Jordan/WLRN

Scientists from South Florida flew to Tallahassee Tuesday for a 30-minute meeting with Gov. Rick Scott.  They went to explain how and why the climate is changing.

The group tried to convince Scott that climate change is real, and humans are at least partly responsible.

Harold Wanless is a professor of geological science at the University of Miami. He says the sea level is rising fast.

freedigitalphotos.net

Yesterday, the Miami-Dade Sea Level Rise Task Force released a report detailing six recommendations to the county. 

The main recommendation calls on county officials to consult experts to create an infrastructure that can adapt to rising sea levels. 

Jim Murley is the executive director of the South Florida Regional Planning Council, and was the vice-chairperson of the task force.

Flickr photo from VgM8989

As an undergrad at Louisiana State University, I learned quickly what it means to live in a swamp. I left our college newsroom after an all-nighter working a tropical storm and found my car parked behind Tiger Stadium — filled to the stickshift with murky brown water.

Nickolay Lamm / StorageFront.com

Current climate change and sea level rise models indicate a very grim -- and water-logged -- future for South Florida and Miami in particular. But new imagery from researcher/artist Nickolay Lamm paints an almost hypnotic picture of these proposed realties for American cities like Miami, Boston, Washington D.C., and New York.

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