gay marriage

Andy Newman / Florida Keys News Service

Lots of people have trouble figuring out what to do on New Year's Eve every year. Not Gary Marion of Key West — better known to the wider world as the drag queen Sushi.

"On New Year's Eve, I sit in a big, red, giant high heel and I get descended at the stroke of midnight," she says. "It will be my 19th year in the shoe."

Like most years, Sushi is making an elaborate outfit for herself for the big night. Unlike most years, she's also creating outfits for a flower girl, bridesmaids and the "ordained drag queen minister" who will be marrying Sushi and her fiance, Jeff Kusin.

Courtesy Richard Rodriguez

When South Florida marketing executive Richard Rodriguez went to his 10th class reunion at Miami's Belen Jesuit Preparatory School five years ago, he brought his partner, Cédric Mahé. They had a great time, and Rodriguez recalls them ending the evening playing beer pong with some of his straight classmates, who had no problems hanging out with a gay couple.

Eric Gay / AP File

The pro-LGBT group Equality Florida announced Wednesday that Jim Obergefell will be the organization's 2015 winner of the Voice for Equality Award. 

Obergefell was the lead plaintiff in June's Supreme Court ruling that granted same-sex couples the right to marry in all 50 states. 

Rob O'Neal / Florida Keys News Bureau

Though same-sex marriage in Florida became legal in January, South Florida residents are participating in the buzz following Friday’s Supreme Court ruling. A 5-4 vote established that same-sex couples can now marry nationwide.

Residents in Wilton Manors, one of South Florida’s largest and most vocal gay communities, had a personal stake in the court’s decision.

States cannot keep same-sex couples from marrying and must recognize their unions, the Supreme Court says in a ruling that for months has been the focus of speculation. The decision was 5-4.

Justice Anthony Kennedy, seen as a pivotal swing vote in the case, wrote the majority opinion. All four justices who voted against the ruling wrote their own dissenting opinions: Chief Justice John Roberts and Justices Antonin Scalia, Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito.

Creative Commons via Flickr / Pete Jordan (https://flic.kr/p/c3STn3)

This year, the U.S. Supreme Court has taken on a litany of big cases with far-reaching implications especially for Floridians. Here are some things you need to know about how several upcoming decisions will affect the Sunshine State.

Walter Michot / Miami Herald

Jeff and Todd Delmay, a South Florida couple from Hollywood,  were among the first gay couples married in Florida.

The two men were also plaintiffs in the case that overturned Florida's ban on same sex marriage.

The Delmays are now  in Washington for Tuesday’s highly anticipated U.S. Supreme Court’s hearing on gay marriage. The court’s decision will ultimately determine  if same-sex marriage will be recognized nationwide

Two questions are before the court: 

Jessica Meszaros / WLRN

About 100 LGBT couples from around the world married at the W Hotel in Fort Lauderdale Thursday morning. It was a group wedding in honor of Florida’s ruling allowing same-sex marriage in January. The Greater Fort Lauderdale Convention and Visitors Bureau partnered with a few companies to host the event. 

City of St Pete/flickr

Same-sex marriage is now legal in three dozen states, including Florida. The U.S. Supreme Court may issue a landmark ruling soon that will impact the rest of the country.

Florida’s voter-approved 2008 constitutional amendment banning gay marriage was struck down by federal Judge Robert Hinkle as unconstitutional.

law.fsu.edu

Florida’s constitutional amendment banning gay marriage was passed by 62 percent of voters in 2008. But various lower court rulings last year found the ban to be unconstitutional, and federal judge Robert Hinkle agreed.

Now, same sex couples can marry in Florida, but four states have gay marriage cases pending before the U.S. Supreme Court.

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