Senate President Targets Fantasy Sports

Oct 21, 2015
Andrew Harrer / Bloomberg via Miami Herald

Florida Senate President Andy Gardiner is exploring what the state can do to shut down daily fantasy sports, even as federal prosecutors are probing the online industry that has taken the nation by storm and drawn accusations of illegal gambling.

Gardiner has asked his lawyers to look into fantasy sports, in which players pay entry fees to draft "teams" that compete against each other for cash prizes based on the actual performance of players.

Mr Spil/flickr

The Seminole Tribe of Florida wants to keep its exclusive rights to blackjack and other banked card games, but the Legislature's abrupt adjournment this year might have dealt the tribe a bad hand. 


It’s been two years since Florida passed a law shutting down Internet cafes. Now, the Florida House has approved a bill clarifying that family-friendly amusement centers are perfectly legal, and the Senate version is also close to a vote.

The state was in a hurry to get rid of Internet cafes. The storefront shops were multiplying rapidly because many of them were getting away with illegal slot machine gambling.

Thomas Davison/flickr

The Seminole Tribe of Florida has released another TV ad -- the third so far -- trying to convince state leaders to renew a portion of the Seminole Gaming Compact.

The portion that expires in July allows the Seminole tribe to exclusively offer games like blackjack at its casinos. In return, the tribe guarantees a billion dollars’ worth of payments to the state over five years.

Seminole Tribe Looks For Opening In Gambling Talks

Mar 19, 2015
Kim's Pics/flickr

THE CAPITAL, TALLAHASSEE, March 18, 2015…… In the latest hand in a public game of poker between the Legislature and the Seminole Tribe of Florida, tribal leaders provided a glimpse Wednesday into behind-the-scenes negotiations --- or lack of negotiations --- on renewing a lucrative part of a $1 billion gambling deal with the state.

B Breland Photograhy/flickr

The first bill expected to pass quickly when the Legislature opens in March would force dog tracks to report greyhound injuries within seven days.


In our final installment of Session 2014: The Sunshine Edition, we highlight the big events from this legislative season.

Stand Your Ground reform did not get far, but bills to allow undocumented immigrants to pay in-state tuition at state colleges and universities and to legalize a form of medical marijuana made it through the Republican-controlled legislature, and Governor Rick Scott says he will sign them. 

WLRN-Miami Herald News' Gina Jordan walks us through hallways of the Capitol in the remaining hours of the session.

Palm Beach County Is Slot Out Of Luck

May 2, 2014
Lisann Ramos

This legislative session  has toyed with the hearts of gaming aficionados who want more gambling, especially in Palm Beach County. 

Giants like Genting are pushing for casinos in Miami-Dade and Broward, but Palm Beach doesn't seem to be getting the same amount of love. 

Because of a vote that took place 10 years ago, Palm Beach doesn't allow slot machines in the county. 

This leaves gamblers there with no other option but to go south for slots. Elizabeth Paquette of West Palm Beach is one of those gamblers.


In addition to legislation that won't go through, big players like Disney and the Seminole tribe are making sure the odds are against expanding Florida casino gambling.

Hollywood Kennel Club/Flickr

The Florida Senate's Select Committee on Gaming makes its last stand in Tallahassee this week with a couple of bills that could end greyhound racing in the Sunshine State. It's the only gambling issue that still remains within the committee's grasp.

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