Are FPL Customers Paying $43M For Nuclear Projects That May Never Happen?

Oct 1, 2013
FPL.com / Courtesy

Florida Power & Light customers will pay nearly $43.5 million next year for nuclear-power projects, including $16.2 million for a plan to eventually build two new reactors in Miami-Dade County, state regulators decided Tuesday.

The project costs will have relatively little impact on customers' monthly bills. A residential customer who uses 1,000 kilowatt hours of electricity a month will pay about 46 cents.


The demand for electricity is growing in South Florida, but Florida Power and Light has been tearing down power plants.

The power plants like the one in the slideshow above have been generating electricity for more than 50 years in many cases. Often, they burned oil to make power.

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Marsha Halper / Miami Herald Staff

Five years and more than $650 million into refurbishing and building nuclear reactors, Florida Power & Light officials told regulators Monday that it can’t guarantee what new reactors will cost consumers, when the reactors will deliver energy, or even if it will get a license to finish the job.

Despite the uncertainty, the state’s largest electric company asked regulators to allow it to continue to charge customers to pay for the prospective expansion of the Turkey Point plant on Biscayne Bay in south Miami-Dade County.

Duke Energy Customers To Pay More As Nuke Plans Scrapped

Aug 6, 2013

Florida customers of Duke Energy should expect to pay more next year for nuclear projects, even as the company reduces its planned nuclear footprint.

Meanwhile, Florida Power & Light, which has recently completed upgrades of two nuclear facilities, will lower the amount it collects for nuclear projects. For a homeowner who uses 1,000 kilowatt hours of power a month, that will save $1.17.

At 6:46 a.m. this morning, the FPL Port Everglades Power Plant vanished from the I-595 skyline, demolished to make way for an energy efficient future. 

But, while this demolition only lasted a mere minute, it required months of preparation and a professional demolition team, who called the demolition “a controlled implosion.”

FPL.com / Courtesy


In a wide-ranging interview back in February, Florida Power & Light President Eric Silagy addressed a number of issues facing the state's largest utility.

The responses prompted a slew of feedback on topics ranging from storm preparedness and climate change to renewable energy sources.

Nuclear Power

FPL.com / Courtesy

02/06/13  - Wednesday's Topical Currents addresses the expansion of FPL’s Turkey Point electric power facility.  Last month, the Miami-Dade Commission granted a go-ahead for zoning changes, which enables construction of new nuclear reactors.  Environmentalists decry the expansion, but FPL says safety is the utmost consideration . . . that they’ll serve a growing population with lower bills and less fossil fuel usage.


Florida Power and Light is the state's largest utility serving roughly 4.6 million customers.

Since 2006, FPL customers have been paying what's called a "Nuclear Cost Recovery Fee," which enables the utility to charge in advance for future costs of building and improving nuclear power plants.

Since then, about $320 million has been raised to add 525 megawatts of new power to Turkey Point in South Miami-Dade.