FPL

WALTER MICHOT / Miami Herald

Florida Power & Light spent $3 billion over the past decade to strengthen its lines and power grid. But after Hurricane Irma left millions of FPL customers without power for a week or more, critics are asking what the money accomplished. 

The utility company says that the money was well spent and that the recovery after Irma went far better than the efforts after Hurricane Wilma. We'll hear from the utility on their performance, as well as the Florida Office of Public Counsel, the office created to represent utility consumers.

CAITLIN OSTROFF / MIAMI HERALD

The Florida Roundup concentrated this week on the recovery efforts after Hurricane Irma. Guests included: 

Lineman Working In South Florida After Hurricane Irma Dies In Fall From Garage

Sep 21, 2017
Al Diaz / Miami Herald

A lineman from Sebring who was working to restore power in South Florida after Hurricane Irma fell to his death Sunday from the fifth floor of a Fort Lauderdale parking garage, police said.

Scott Christopher Reid, Jr. , 26, was preparing for work and standing near his truck around 5:25 a.m. at the Westin Fort Lauderdale Beach Resort garage, at 321 N Fort Lauderdale Beach Blvd., when he fell, police said.

Detectives are not calling the incident a suspicious death and declined to release additional information.

Donna E. Natale Planas / Miami Herald

If you live in South Dade, and you still don’t have power, get ready to sweat a little longer.

FPL has tweaked its promise of restoring power to Miami-Dade County by Sunday night. Instead, anyone living south of Miller Drive — Coral Gables, South Miami, Pinecrest, Palmetto Bay, Cutler Bay, Homestead and Florida City — will have their power restored by Tuesday night.

“We have refined our timeline,” FPL spokesman Richard Beltran told the Miami Herald late Friday. “Harder hit areas in South Dade will be up by Tuesday.”

Pedro Portal / Miami Herald

If you’re still fretting in the dark about when your power will finally be restored, take heart: Florida Power & Light Co. has doubled-down on its promise to have the electricity up and running for all homes and businesses on the state’s east coast by the end of Sunday Sept. 17.

The west coast, where Hurricane Irma caused the greatest damage, will be back online by Friday Sept. 22.

C.M. GUERRERO. / Miami Herald

As hundreds of thousands of people in South Florida remain without power in the aftermath of Hurricane Irma, many people are figuring out how to proceed. Here are answers to some of the questions you’ve been asking, including ones about where to get ice, where to dispose of debris and how long your refrigerator can stay cool. 

Alexandra Clough / Palm Beach Post

The city of Boca Raton suffered “several million dollars” worth of damage to its beaches from Hurricane Irma, Mayor Susan Haynie said Wednesday.

 

“The dunes got crushed,” said Chrissy Gibson, city spokeswoman. 

In addition, 49 percent of the city remained without power as of noon on Wednesday, Gibson said.

 

The city, like the rest of county, is slated to have its power restored by Sunday, Gibson said. In the interim, the county’s midnight to 6 a.m. curfew will be enforced in the city.

 

FPL

Florida Power & Light has at least 11,000 crew members on standby to restore power after Hurricane Irma.

The utility says some substations may be shut off if flood waters get close - which means some people may be without power as the worst of the storm approaches. FPL spokesman Rob Gould says preemptively shutting off substations will allow for faster restoration of power after the storm.

Two New Solar Co-ops Launch In South Miami

May 24, 2017
Holly Pretsky / WLRN

About 30 people dressed in yellow t-shirts gathered in front of South Miami City Hall Wednesday to announce the addition of two new solar co-ops in South Florida.

A solar co-op is a group of homeowners who team up to install solar panels on their rooftops and use solar energy. Together, they are able to negotiate lower prices by contracting with the lowest bidder. 

Fl Power & Light Accelerates Plans To Add Solar Power

Feb 21, 2017

Florida's largest electric utility intends to double its solar-energy plans for the coming year, leading solar proponents to praise the announcement --- and say they would like to see more.

A month after outlining plans to build four solar plants this year, Florida Power & Light on Monday said it will put up eight such facilities by early 2018.

The company anticipates the plants --- combining to create nearly 600 megawatts of power, enough for about 120,000 homes at peak production --- will save customers "millions" over the lifetime of each center.

Florida Power & Light Company

Whether they took the brunt of Hurricane Matthew or experienced a rainy breeze, Florida Power & Light (FPL) customers will spend the next year paying for the utility's response to the early October storm.

The state Public Service Commission on Tuesday approved --- with little comment --- a $318.5 million request by FPL to cover the costs of restoring power after the storm pummeled parts of the East Coast. Part of the money also will help the company replenish its storm reserve fund, which stood at $93.1 million before Matthew.

FPL

Florida Power & Light broke ground on a new control center designed to sustain category 5 hurricanes. It’s part of the company's $2 billion, decade-long infrastructure hardening plan, which includes facilities upgrades across the state.

 

Manny Miranda is the company’s senior vice president in charge of power delivery. He says the distribution center upgrade is part of FPL's ongoing efforts to improve its response to storms.

 

Florida Power and Light is asking the state for a temporary rate hike to recover costs from Hurricane Matthew. FPL says in the wake of the storm it deployed thousands of employees and contract workers, and replaced more than 250 miles of wire, 900 transformers and 400 poles. To cover those costs, it’s asking the state Public Service Commission to allow a temporary charge that adds up to $3.36 a month for the average residential customer.

State regulators Tuesday unanimously approved a settlement agreement that includes $811 million in base-rate increases for customers of Florida Power & Light, with $400 million slated to take effect Jan. 1.

Florida’s largest electric utility is asking for a $1.3 billion rate hike.   It’s making its pitch to state regulators.

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