FPL

Fl Power & Light Accelerates Plans To Add Solar Power

Feb 21, 2017

Florida's largest electric utility intends to double its solar-energy plans for the coming year, leading solar proponents to praise the announcement --- and say they would like to see more.

A month after outlining plans to build four solar plants this year, Florida Power & Light on Monday said it will put up eight such facilities by early 2018.

The company anticipates the plants --- combining to create nearly 600 megawatts of power, enough for about 120,000 homes at peak production --- will save customers "millions" over the lifetime of each center.

Florida Power & Light Company

Whether they took the brunt of Hurricane Matthew or experienced a rainy breeze, Florida Power & Light (FPL) customers will spend the next year paying for the utility's response to the early October storm.

The state Public Service Commission on Tuesday approved --- with little comment --- a $318.5 million request by FPL to cover the costs of restoring power after the storm pummeled parts of the East Coast. Part of the money also will help the company replenish its storm reserve fund, which stood at $93.1 million before Matthew.

FPL

Florida Power & Light broke ground on a new control center designed to sustain category 5 hurricanes. It’s part of the company's $2 billion, decade-long infrastructure hardening plan, which includes facilities upgrades across the state.

 

Manny Miranda is the company’s senior vice president in charge of power delivery. He says the distribution center upgrade is part of FPL's ongoing efforts to improve its response to storms.

 

Florida Power and Light is asking the state for a temporary rate hike to recover costs from Hurricane Matthew. FPL says in the wake of the storm it deployed thousands of employees and contract workers, and replaced more than 250 miles of wire, 900 transformers and 400 poles. To cover those costs, it’s asking the state Public Service Commission to allow a temporary charge that adds up to $3.36 a month for the average residential customer.

State regulators Tuesday unanimously approved a settlement agreement that includes $811 million in base-rate increases for customers of Florida Power & Light, with $400 million slated to take effect Jan. 1.

Florida’s largest electric utility is asking for a $1.3 billion rate hike.   It’s making its pitch to state regulators.

Miami Herald

Florida Power & Light has until June 24 to provide a plan to the state Department of Environmental Protection to stop the saltwater plume that originates in the cooling canals at its Turkey Point nuclear power plant in South Miami-Dade.

On Monday, state Sen. Anitere Flores, R-Miami-Dade,  told the South Florida Regional Planning Commission that it was important for people from throughout the region to weigh in and make sure the fix gets done right. 

Kyle Pegolo/flickr

A new poll is out that looks at the attitudes of Miamians on numerous issues. The poll was commissioned by WLRN, el Nuevo Herald, the Miami Herald, and Univision 23.

FPL Faces Lawsuit Over Biscayne Bay Contamination

Mar 22, 2016
Allison Diaz / Miami Herald

Conservation groups plan to sue Florida Power & Light after the discovery of a radioactive isotope in Biscayne Bay linked to a nuclear power plant in southeast Miami-Dade County.

The Southern Alliance for Clean Energy and Tropical Audubon Society on Tuesday issued a 60-day notice of a pending federal lawsuit against the Juno Beach-based power giant.

Florida Power & Light Company

The state's largest electricity provider wants Florida regulators to approve a four-year funding package that would raise the base rate on a typical monthly bill by about $8.50 starting in 2017, with the hike reaching $14 by 2020.

Juno Beach-based Florida Power & Light notified the Public Service Commission on Friday that a proposal will be filed in March asking to increase the monthly charge on a typical customer using 1,000 kilowatt hours of electricity from $93 to $107 by 2020.

Susan Stocker / Sun Sentinel via Miami Herald

Regulators decided Tuesday that a $1.3 billion, natural gas-fired power plant --- proposed in rural Okeechobee County by Florida Power & Light --- is needed to meet the demands of the state's growing population.

The decision by the Florida Public Service Commission came after objections from a pair of environmental groups, the state Office of Public Counsel and the Florida Industrial Power Users Group. The Office of Public Counsel represents consumers in utility issues, while the Florida Industrial Power Users Group represents large electricity users.

Donna E. Natale Planas / Miami Herald

State regulators will hear arguments Tuesday on a proposal by Florida Power & Light to build a power plant in Okeechobee County, but critics question the need for the nearly $1.2 billion project.

FPL contends the natural-gas plant is the "best, most cost-effective option" to meet a need for additional power generation starting in 2019. The project, designed as what is known as a combined-cycle plant, would be built on an undeveloped site owned by FPL in northeast Okeechobee County.

Donna E. Natale Planas / Miami Herald

Almost a year after regulators gave approval to the controversial plan, Florida Supreme Court justices are ready to take up a battle about Florida Power & Light's investment in a natural-gas drilling operation in Oklahoma.

The Supreme Court on Dec. 8 will hear arguments in a challenge led by the state Office of Public Counsel, which represents consumers in utility issues, and the Florida Industrial Power Users Group, which is made up of large electricity customers.

Florida Power & Light Company

The Public Service Commission last year approved Florida Power and Light's plan to go fracking for natural gas in Oklahoma.

Even then, it was clear the utility planned to charge Florida rate payers for the project in another state, and advocates at the Public Counsel's Office filed suit to stop it. The suit is pending, but now the PSC has voted again.

fcir.org

Florida Power And Light wants to build two new power reactors at Turkey Point in south Miami-Dade.

The Nuclear Regulatory Commission met with the public Wednesday at Florida International University to discuss concerns raised by the recent FPL proposal.

Florida Representative José Javier Rodriguez was one of those who spoke out against the idea.

“Basically, the application is seeking approval for two new units on a low peninsula into a shallow bay that’s already highly vulnerable to storm surge,” Rodriguez said.

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